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Category: Uncategorized

Thought Leadership: Marketing & Investor Relations Search Update

Filed under: Hiring, Insights, Societal Shifts, trends, Uncategorized

In the link below please find our Q4 Thought Leadership piece entitled Asset Management Marketing & Investor Relations; Hiring Insights for a Changing Landscape Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.

This paper is designed to update you on market movement, hiring insights, and the expansion of our Marketing & Investor Relations Search Practice here at Solomon Page.

Briefly, here is an excerpt from our Thought Leadership paper forecasting Q4 and 2017 hiring trends…

  • While the demand for client-facing professionals remains strong, we believe new marketing hires will be sector specific, as opposed to mass hiring, particularly systematic and private strategies.
  • There will likely be a continued decrease in consultant relations and product specialist roles, as firms will expect senior marketers to cover those responsibilities. Consultant relations and product specialist roles are expensive hires, and have the potential to be ultimately viewed as cost centers.
  • Junior and midlevel client-facing investor relations roles will continue to be a strong area for recruitment to support the senior hiring boom over the past two years, predominantly in credit.
  • Private strategies will likely become the focus in asset management recruiting for marketing roles, as the asset base is more stable, and investors are no longer shying away from locking up money.
  • Long/short equity hiring will make a comeback. There has been virtually no hiring in the space for the past 3 years, and turnover and retooling are inevitable.

Whether you and your company are seeking a recruitment partner to address your hiring needs, or you are looking for more color on potential opportunities, we look forward to answering your questions.

Written by Alexis DuFresne

Click here to read the complete article >>

How to Tell a Great Interview Story

Filed under: Uncategorized

When I diagnose problems clients have with their interview strategy, I often notice they answer interview questions too generally. They attempt to convey their fit for the job by describing the personal attributes they think make them relevant for the position. They explain they are team players, flexible and good communicators; they claim they are passionate about their work. But rarely do they go much deeper, failing to reveal just how they have leveraged these attributes and skills.

When candidates offer general responses to interview questions, they miss the chance to fully engage with the interviewer. Most hiring managers believe past success is a good indicator of future success. In order to convince them you are the best candidate for the job, you need to showcase stories of success that will be relevant to their work environment. It’s the details of these stories that build rapport and trust, and ultimately help hiring managers to get that “gut feeling” that you are best for the job.

Memorable stories of success explain a challenge you faced, the actions you took to address that challenge, and the corresponding results. Whenever possible, frame your results to show impact and use dollars, percentages or time values that demonstrate the difference you made in a situation.

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >>

10 Job Skills Every Employer Wants

Filed under: Uncategorized

With competition for new jobs at an all-time high, employees must have the skills employers are targeting.
From the ability to communicate effectively to the willingness to wear multiple hats around the office, employers today seek workers with a variety of the skills. Here are 10 skills employers look for most in today’s fast-paced, technologically advanced workplace:
Commitment

Commitment to both their job and their employer is something Dennis Boone, former president and CEO of Verizon New Jersey and the current director of Montclair State University’s Feliciano Center for Entrepreneurship at the School of Business, has always looked for in workers.

Click here to read the rest on Fox Business >>

7 Ways to Get Taken More Seriously at Work – No Matter What Your Job Title Is

Filed under: Uncategorized

Respect isn’t especially difficult to earn, but it must be earned—that is to say, it can’t be won, stumbled upon, or started with. When you first enter the workforce, most people (aside from those with a habit of casting immediate judgment) will view you neutrally, and the habits you exhibit will gradually move them toward one opinion or another; depending on your actions, you could set yourself up to be taken as a serious and professional member of the team, or a slacker unworthy of respect.

Obviously, you want the former. To be successful in almost any field demands that you are taken seriously, and engaging in these habits is the best way to get there:

1. Arrive Early

There’s no need to show up to a meeting an hour early, but give yourself a few extra minutes to get in and get settled—or at least protect yourself against the eventuality of getting sidetracked or detoured. This goes for more than just meetings, of course—it also goes for interviews, lunches, company functions, and daily work in general. Even if your company has a pretty lenient policy when it comes to punctuality, others in your office will notice if you occasionally show up late. Don’t let a simple mistake like lateness compromise your reputation.

Click here to read the rest on The Muse >>

Why You Hate Getting Feedback but Still Need More of It

Filed under: Uncategorized

Early in my career, my boss once came up to me after a client presentation and said, “You put people to sleep.” I was surprised. I’d thought of myself as a good presenter—I was articulate, I avoided filler words, I didn’t read off PowerPoint slides. The feedback irked me—until I began to reassess.

My boss suggested that I hear myself speak. Sure, why not? So behind closed doors, I recorded the presentation I gave earlier. It was true! I sounded boring, monotone, and much less confident than I’d thought.
No one likes being told they aren’t ready yet or good enough, and getting feedback to that effect sometimes makes us feel hurt and defensive. That response is normal, but you shouldn’t let it get in the way of receiving the feedback—in fact, it’s a good sign you need it.
MORE FEEDBACK, PLEASE!

According to Scott Halford, author of Be a Shortcut: The Secret Fast Track to Business Success, “Feedback indicates that an adjustment needs to be made, and the threat response turns on and defensiveness sets in.”

Click here to read the rest on Fast Company >>

13 Secrets for Performing Better Under Pressure

Filed under: Uncategorized

Let’s get this out of the way right now: Nobody performs well under pressure. A lot of us think we do, but we don’t, or, at least, we don’t perform as well as we could perform.

We may feel more creative when we’re under the gun, but it’s a feeling, not a reality. It’s true that you might be more productive, but the products you create are usually worse.

In their new book, “Performing Under Pressure: The Science of Doing Your Best When It Matters Most,” Hendrie Weisinger and J.P. Pawliw-Fry deliver the sad truth: The difference between regular people and ultra-successful people is not that the latter group thrives under pressure. It’s that they’re better able to mitigate its negative effects.

Or maybe that’s good news, because, as they lay out in the book, handling pressure is a skill, and you can learn it. In the book, they offer 22 tactics for doing your best when the heat is on. We took a deep breath and picked out 13 of our favorites.

Click here to read the rest on Business Insider >>

Six Tips for Learning New Skills (and Retaining Them)

Filed under: Uncategorized

A large part of achieving your professional goals is learning new skills, new techniques, new information. All of this is knowledge that you can then apply to your overall growth. I want to share with you what I’ve learned about learning.

While working to build Pico, I’ve not only been trying to learn as much as I can to help us make a better product, but I’ve worked hard to maintain my personal goal of learning French and continued teaching coding classes about once a month. So the topic of how to learn effectively has been one in which I’ve had a deep interest.

Here, then, are some tips to learn new information faster and have it stick longer:

1) Test Yourself as You Make Progress

This tip comes first because it’s so important. During your schooldays, you probably thought of the test as the end-game. But you should really be testing yourself throughout the whole study process. And don’t pat yourself on the back just yet if you think flash cards will cut it.

Click here to read the rest on Life Hacker >>

8 Tips to Be the Most Memorable Person in the Room

Filed under: Uncategorized

Everyone recognizes the importance of expanding your network. What rarely gets said is that meeting people is only really valuable if they remember you. What’s the point of chatting with that high-profile investor or awesome potential hire at an event, if all the person thinks when you get in touch later is “who?”

The coolest and most in-demand people get a lot of introductions. So how do you stand out from this crowd without being creepy or gimmicky? Experts have a host of clever tricks to offer:

1. Go niche
Several experts note that being more specific when you talk about what you do will make you more memorable. “Most people say, ‘I do legal work’ or ‘I help people with the accounting’ or ‘I set up computer systems,’ says author Mike Michalowicz on Open Forum. “Aspire to be ‘the guy’ for a niche category in your industry. So instead of doing computers or even being ‘the computer guy,’ be the ‘stable computers guy.’” Assumedly, this works for gals as well.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

5 Enjoyable Weekend Habits That Set You Up for Success

Filed under: Good Habits, Strategy, Success, Uncategorized, Work-Life Balance

Understandably, the weekend is a time when many workers focus on relaxation, family and fun. And there’s nothing at all wrong with that, but you can also think bigger. Instead of simply using the weekend for leisure time, there are things you can do ahead of time to help your next work week go more smoothly.

Unfortunately, we rarely appreciate the power habits can have in transforming our lives. Whether you’re new to habit-building or you’re an old hand, give these five weekend habits a try in order to set yourself up for a successful work week.

1. Get enough sleep.
Many times, we throw away our typical schedules on weekends – telling ourselves that staying out late or getting less sleep is “no problem” since it’s the weekend. But this habit sets you up for failure by making it hard to get up on schedule on Monday morning.

Click here to read the rest on Business Insider >>

Think Grammar Doesn’t Matter? It Could Be Holding You Back From a Promotion

Filed under: Career Advice, Cognitive Ability, Feedback, Insights, Uncategorized

Many people think that once they leave school, they don’t need to worry about grammar. In the real world, most people will just figure out what you mean … right?

Not quite. Turns out, quality writing can help you get ahead in your career — and poor writing can hold you back. So if you want to get ahead in the workplace, change careers, or find a job, then it’s time to dust off that dictionary, thumb through your thesaurus, and get a grip on grammar.

At Grammarly, we found some data to back this up. We studied 100 LinkedIn profiles of native English-speakers in the consumer packaged goods industry, and each of the professionals we looked at worked for no more than three employers over the first 10 years of their career. Half were promoted to director-level or above within those 10 years, and the other half were not.

We discovered a correlation between the number of grammar and spelling errors in a profile and the trajectory of that person’s career. Here are some of our study’s main takeaways:

Click here to read the rest on HubSpot Blogs >>