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Category: Success

First Week on the Job

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Best Advice, Career Advice, Communication, Success

You walk through the revolving door of the lobby toward the elevator, soaking in your surroundings—there’s not a familiar face in the building. You straighten out your suit, press #12, and take a deep breath: Once those doors re-open, your first week of work will officially begin.

Whether it’s your first position or your fifth, those first few days on the job can be more than a little intimidating. But with these key rules, you can get comfortable in your new surroundings, get up to speed quickly, and get off on the right foot with your new boss and co-workers

Do: Be a Sponge

One of your most important duties your first week is absorbing everything. Getting to know your company’s culture, the working and communication styles of your teammates, the problem projects, office politics, and department or company-wide goals means that you’ll be able to start your real work sooner (and be more effective when you do).

So, go to the new hire orientation, sign up for professional development classes, and attend all the team and office meetings you can, even if you’re not yet sure what’s going on or they don’t 100% pertain to your work.

Also join in on the informal events. If you get asked to lunch, happy hour, or the office softball league (either as a participant or onlooker), say yes. It’s a great way to meet people, and it shows that you’re excited to be part of the team.

Don’t: Overcommit Yourself

Do be careful, though, to balance your schedule—you want to have plenty of time to learn the ropes from your desk. The last thing you want is to look like you have too much to juggle, seem overwhelmed, or show up late to a commitment because you’re stuck somewhere else.

Do: Ask Questions

As you learn about new processes, projects, and people, don’t be afraid to ask questions. You need to get up to speed, and people will expect it from the new person on the team. Also take down detailed notes about everything you learn, even if it seems simple. Your brain is going to be on overload this week, and writing everything down will make sure you don’t have to ask the same question twice.

Don’t: Be Afraid to Speak Up

At the same time, don’t be afraid to contribute and add value—you do want to reinforce that you’re the right person for the job! No, you won’t know everything (nor should you act like you do!), but you can make suggestions in team meetings or brainstorming sessions, or ask questions like, “Has this been tried before?” And if you have a skill or ability that you’ve been hired to bring to the team, pipe up and share that knowledge. But be careful to read your audience. You don’t want to come on like gangbusters or step on someone’s toes.

Do: Offer to Help

There may be some down time during your first few days on the job as your boss and team adjust to having you there. But don’t sit around waiting for others to figure out tasks for you—volunteer to help your new teammates on a project. You’ll show initiative, you’ll build rapport with your boss and co-workers, and you’ll learn about expectations, procedures, and how things are done.

Continue reading this article by Laura Katen on The Muse.

Career Advice for College Graduates

Filed under: accountability, ambition, Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Best Advice, Career & Money, Career Advice, Communication, Decision Making, Goals, Good Habits, Quick Tips, Skills, Success

Most of the best career advice isn’t learned in school or discussed during formal annual reviews. They’re the priceless nuggets of wisdom you tend to learn through the school of hard knocks instead – sometimes too late. One of the best gifts that seasoned leaders can give to college graduates is practical, candid feedback on what they really need to know to succeed in the “corporate jungle.”

In classic David Letterman style, here are my top 10 career advice tips for college graduates and early career professionals:

#10 Build relationships before you need them

Don’t wait until you need something to have a substantial discussion with your team leader or other key executives. A crisis is a real buzz kill for relationship building so avoid building relationships in the midst of a crisis and instead build them before you need them. Director of Columbia University’s Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Programs, Beth Fisher-Yoshida discusses the importance of relationship building in 5 Ways to Develop More Meaningful Relationships at Work.

#9 Learn your boss’ communications preferences early and adapt to them

When you adjust your style to better fit your manager’s communication/work style preferences, you become easier to manage – and that’s a good thing! This becomes even more important when you encounter that unavoidable “difficult boss” which research shows will likely happen at some point. Learning effective managing up techniques can mean the difference between success and failure when faced with a challenging boss personality.

#8 Don’t hide your awesome

Inexperience can be an asset so use it! Don’t hold back on sharing a completely different idea or approach, or questioning if there might be a better way. Your lack of “experience” could be the key to innovation so leverage that. If you’ve developed a template for tracking incoming orders or have used an amazing app for researching vendors, share that with your team. If there’s momentum around an area where you have expertise, don’t be afraid to volunteer to lead the effort. Remember that you don’t have to know everything to take lead on a project or task.

#7 Become the go-to person for something valuable

I like to say it’s not just “what you know and who you know” but also “who knows you and what you’re known for.” Becoming known as the Prezi, Slack or Sharepoint expert not only builds your organizational credibility, but it also creates demand for your participation in a wide range of projects that you may not have otherwise had exposure to. Stay attuned to the high demand skill sets in your industry or organization and develop deep skills in an area that is highly valued. If you become known as the resident Prezi expert in the company, you might find yourself working directly with the EVP on her upcoming board presentation and that one on one face time can prove invaluable. Over time you’ll want to be careful not to become pigeon-holed into one particular skill set, but building extreme competency in a few areas early is virtually always a smart move.

#6 Fiercely manage your personal brand

Just as the brands Tiffany, Coke and McDonalds evoke very specific sentiments as you think about them, your name has the same impact when others hear it. Decide what you want people to think about when your name is mentioned, then get about the business of building and managing your personal brand. Whether it’s your dress, lunch buddies, cell phone ring or email syntax, remember that with every choice you’re reinforcing your personal brand. Joseph Liu’s 5 Ways to Build Your Personal Brand At Work insists that brand building isn’t just for executives; it’s for everyone.

To read the full article by Dana Brownlee, visit it here at Forbes.com.

Solomon Page Changes the Recruitment Landscape for Fashion, Retail, and Beauty Markets

Filed under: ambition, Communication, company culture, Company News, innovation, Job Market, Leadership, News, Organization, Press Release, Recruiting & Hiring, Solomon Page, Success, Thought Leadership, Women Leaders

The Company Acquires Retained Executive Search Firm E.A. Hughes & Co.

NEW YORK, NY, January 28, 2019 – Solomon Page, a specialty niche provider of staffing solutions and executive search, announces the acquisition of E.A. Hughes & Co., a leading retained executive search firm servicing the retail and consumer markets. Founded by Elaine Hughes in 1991, E.A. Hughes & Co. has advised clients in their strategic growth initiatives through a unique and comprehensive approach to the search process.

The E.A. Hughes team will continue to be led by Elaine Hughes and will join the Fashion & Beauty Division of Solomon Page, led by Sue Lamoreaux and Patty Hoban Scott in the full-time and freelance fashion markets, respectively. This will further complement the excellent reputation the company holds both geographically and strategically.

“I am thrilled by the synergy this acquisition will provide to each of our clients,” said Elaine Hughes. “It will allow the team to deliver unpreceded talent acquisition encompassing the C-suite executive placements to temporary hires from a single source”.

Sue Lamoreaux adds, “We are very excited to have the opportunity to partner with Elaine and her team. She has influenced the careers of many senior executives in retail and fashion and advocated for women in the industry by example and involvement in many organizations during the past three decades.”

Simultaneously Solomon Page has increased its capabilities in the beauty segment, recently adding Lisa Berger to the team to spearhead the expansion. Ms. Berger has a proven track record in strategic talent acquisition and will advise beauty brands as they seek to build their organizations, in addition to providing relevant content and access to diverse channel partnerships.

“In the ever-evolving landscape of human capital and business models, our goal is to adapt to shifts in the marketplace and create a multi-faceted approach to our clients,” said Lloyd Solomon, Founding Partner and Managing Director of Solomon Page. “Our existing footprint coupled with E.A. Hughes’ established presence uniquely qualifies us as a progressive and forward-thinking brand in the new world of the retail, fashion, and beauty industries. Additionally, our strong and longstanding relationships in the financial services and private equity communities, led by Founding Partner and Managing Director Scott Page, uniquely position our firm as a strategic partner and advisor during this transformational time in the industry.”

How to Ace Your Phone Interview

Filed under: ambition, Best Advice, Career Advice, Communication, Confidence, Efficiency, Focus, Goals, Good Habits, Hiring, How To, Interviews, Job Market, Persistence, Personality, Productivity, Professional Development, Quick Tips, Success, Thought Leadership, Your Career

Hiring managers are more often opting to start the interview process over the phone in interest of saving time and resources. Some even choose to hire a candidate based solely on a phone screen. Although efficient, these interviews can sometimes put a candidate at a disadvantage because they don’t have the opportunity to impress the hiring manager with a face-to-face interaction. Gregg Gavioli, Managing Director of the Accounting & Finance division of Solomon Page, offers the following tips on how to improve your phone interviewing skills and increase the probability of being called back for an in-person follow up.

Be Prepared

Most individuals often underestimate the significance of a phone interview in the hiring process and therefore do not prepare adequately. This mistake can lead the hiring manager to believe you are indifferent or uninterested in the position. To avoid missing out on a job opportunity because of this, try out the following tactics:

  • Research the company: Be sure to learn everything you can about the organization and be prepared to talk about it.
  • Research the person you are speaking with: Always look up the person you are scheduled to speak with on LinkedIn, Google, and the company website, if applicable. Look for common interests that may be useful to bring up if the timing is appropriate.
  • Find a quiet place: Make sure you are in a quiet place where you will not be disturbed for the duration of the interview. If you cannot do the phone screen at your home, check with your local library to reserve a private room.
  • Confirm logistics of the call: Make sure you know the exact time of the call and who is calling who. If you plan to take the call from your cell phone, make sure you are in a place with good reception that won’t cut out during the interview. Test the location for the quality of the reception prior to the interview.
  • Reference your résumé: Be sure to have a copy of your résumé printed out or on screen in front of you to reference during your conversation.
  • Take notes: Keep a paper and pen nearby and jot down notes when the hiring manager is talking—refer back to them when it is your turn to ask questions.

Be Awake, Alert, and Enthusiastic

The downside to phone interviews is the interviewer cannot see your face and therefore your facial expressions. This can hinder them from getting an accurate gage of your interest in the position. To help, try the following:

  • Stand up: It is easier to project with our voices when we are standing. Standing will help you sound more engaged and articulate.
  • Smile: Your voice will sound more enthusiastic if you simply smile while you’re talking.
  • Wake yourself up: This is most relevant in early morning interviews, especially if you are not a morning person. Make sure to give yourself ample time to wake up and try drinking coffee, taking a shower, or exercising before your interview.

A phone interview is one of the initial stages in obtaining a new position, and can also be one of the most important. To ultimately stand out to employers be sure you are prepared and engaged—because what was once a job opportunity, can soon be a job.

By: Gregg Gavioli, Managing Director, Accounting & Finance division of Solomon Page

The Secret to Entrepreneurial Employee Performance Reviews

Filed under: Insights, Leadership and Management, Professional Development, Solomon Page, Strategy, Success, Thought Leadership

Entrepreneurs create opportunities for their companies and people to grow.

For a forward-thinking leader, facilitating the development of their most valuable assets, talented people, allows each individual to realize their potential. They ensure that boundaries are minimized and innovative thinking is rewarded – no matter what the nature of the outcome. The most sustainable growth is born from creativity and calculated risk-taking, in conjunction with analysis and contemplation.

The non-linear nature of such growth means that it is hard to fit in a one-size-fits-all box.

When a professional journey is so fluid, it doesn’t fit well within a formal framework. Big corporations have long championed the quarterly and annual review process as a tool for continuous assessment and appraisal, but as it has to be suitable for a wide range of employees, it is often the case that something that is “good” for all is rarely “excellent” for any.

An entrepreneurial mindset within such a large organization would find such a cookie-cutter review process incredibly limiting. A more individualized approach is desirable.

At Solomon Page, our divisions have long enjoyed a significant degree of autonomy. One of our core values is agility, and mandating that each practice leader develop their teams following the exact same framework is counterproductive. A shared set of core values, combined with a flexible approach, guides our organizational growth strategy.

We try our best to take a page out of the entrepreneurial playbook.

One of the most important things to consider in an entrepreneurial review is to approach the conversation from the point of view of the employee and employer rather than just the employer. It is empowering to have an employee participate in their career growth and goal-setting, rather than having goals dictated for them. People commit when the fire comes from within and they hold themselves accountable. When you provide an employee with an opportunity to participate while leading them in the right direction, it is incredibly powerful and productive.

The second consideration is to ensure that performance is rewarded and acknowledged.

When you have such an approach where excellence is rewarded, it is important to encourage people to aim high. With this comes the probability of failure. An entrepreneurial culture should factor in this possibility in every developmental conversation. When failure is normalized in the decision-making process, it fosters an environment of healthy risk-taking and engagement. The review process should encourage people to aim high to reach their potential. Setting ambitious goals, and plotting a path towards them, is one of the most rewarding aspects of a manager / employee relationship, and builds a shared commitment to a unified set of objectives.

The employee review process becomes a staging post towards excellence.

Lloyd Solomon Featured in Real Estate REality Check Podcast

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Company News, Insights, Interviews, Professional Development, Solomon Page, Success, Thought Leadership

Lloyd Solomon, Managing Director of Solomon Page, was recently interviewed by Larry Haber in his podcast Leasing REality: Real Estate REality Check.

Larry conducts an ongoing series of weekly conversations with business executives designed to empower emerging and seasoned professionals to reach their full business potential. Using rock ‘n roll, hip hop, and pop culture analogies as the basis for many of his questions, the overwhelming majority of responses from his guests are informative, entertaining, and most importantly, a conduit to help incentivize listeners to become masters of their career and/or business domains.

Lloyd speaks to his journey building his business over the past 28 years, including the highs and lows, and prevalent lessons learned. He gives advice to business owners on how to lead a successful company and satisfied staff, in addition to providing insight to candidates looking to excel in their career.

You can listen to the podcast here.

5 Things You Deserve From Your Job (No Matter Where You Work)

Filed under: company culture, Professional Development, Respect, Success, Work-Life Balance, Your Career

I have news for you: There’s no such thing as a perfect job. Even the careers that seem like they jumped straight from your dreams and into reality have their downsides—that’s why there’s a paycheck involved.

But, while you might never love every aspect of your job, there are a few things that you absolutely deserve to get from your career—aside from enough money to cover your bills.

Believe me, I get it. It’s easy to think that wanting and needing these things makes you picky, entitled, or high-maintenance. You’re getting paid to be there, so how much else do you really need?

Well, think about it this way: You’re going to invest a large chunk of your time, energy, and attention into your job. That means that a work environment that checks the following boxes isn’t something that you should consider to be meant for just the lucky few—it’s something you deserve just as much.

1. A Safe and Supportive Environment

Let’s start with the basics. You’re more than worthy of feeling safe and supported in your office. You should be able to bring your authentic self (your authentic professional self, of course) into work and not feel worried or threatened when doing so.

Rest assured that your expectations in regards to feeling secure in your surroundings aren’t unreasonable or out of line.

Nobody should have to head into the office day in and day out wondering who’s going to throw them under the bus or stab them in the back. You’re entitled to a basic sense of respect and a company culture that isn’t overflowing with toxicity.

2. A Boss Who’s Invested in Your Growth

When it comes to your career, your manager should be your greatest ally. They should be in the loop on your desires and plans for professional development and provide necessary support and guidance whenever they can.

If you feel like your supervisor is always undermining your accomplishments, offering criticisms that are in no way constructive, and is completely disinterested in your growth and advancement, know that you’re justified in wanting more.

3. An Understanding of Your Life Outside of Work

Work is a big part of your life—but it’s still only a part. It’s not the entirety of your existence, and you’re entitled to an employer who understands that fact.

Endless pings and emails when your team knows you’re away and unplugged. Major hurdles and complaints when you have a family emergency to deal with. Relentless guilt trips when you finally take a well-deserved vacation.

Those are things you shouldn’t have to deal with on a regular basis. You deserve a life outside of your job—and an employer who encourages you to live one.

You can continue reading this article on The Muse.

The Evolution of Adaptive Clothing: A Night with Solomon Page and Runway of Dreams

Filed under: Big Ideas & Innovation, creativity, innovation, Leadership, News, Persistence, Professional Women, Social Impact, Success

On June 25th Solomon Page hosted an event dedicated to the exploration of adaptive clothing. The evening included an intimate cocktail reception and featured guest speaker Mindy Scheier, founder of Runway of Dreams Foundation, an organization dedicated to a future of inclusion, acceptance and opportunity in the fashion industry for people with disabilities.

Lloyd Solomon, Managing Director for Solomon Page, interviewed Mindy following a brief video that introduced Runway of Dreams’ history and mission. He opened the discussion speaking to our philanthropic spirit as a company. Solomon Page felt a relationship with this organization was an organic fit—our main core values closely align with those of Runway of Dreams’.

As Mindy explained during the Q&A, the inspiration for the concept was her son, who suffers from Muscular Dystrophy: though he wanted to wear jeans like his classmates, it was a struggle to take them on and off by himself. Thanks to patience and perseverance, Mindy was able to construct a pair he was able to slip in and out of without her help. As an audience member who also has a son with physical disabilities joked: “When my son wanted to wear nice clothes, I just got them tailored; I didn’t try to revolutionize the entire fashion industry.”

Realizing the desperate void to better accommodate people with disabilities, Mindy took it upon herself to address it. She explained that even though people with physical disabilities are a huge and underserved population–one in 20 people in the U.S. has a disability that affects their ability to dress themselves—mainstream brands were not actively selling in this market. But after some determination and research, Mindy partnered with Tommy Hilfiger in 2016 to build an adaptive clothing line, Tommy Adaptive.

As Mindy discussed, there were three main design factors to consider, that her son, and most people with physical disabilities, battled with: adjustability, closures, and alternative ways to put clothes on. The clothing is adaptable in a sense that it’s adjustable by size and length, mimicking an “internal hemming system” – she lamented that, during her research, she discovered people with disabilities can spend hundreds on tailoring. She also found that zippers, buttons, and hooks posed problems, so she added closures that were more user-friendly, such as magnets. Lastly, many people with physical disabilities, especially people in wheelchairs, are usually unable to stand up and pull clothes over their head, so she designed clothes that presented alternative ways to take on and off.

Many of the audience members resonated with Mindy’s vision, and her son’s personal struggles: people cited elderly parents who struggled to dress themselves in anything fashionable, or other family members who had disabilities. Mindy revealed that businesses are beginning to recognize that people with disabilities are a vastly untapped market: creating the ability to serve over one billion people globally, while presenting a potentially lucrative business opportunity for astute companies.

Click here to learn more information about Runway of Dreams.

Some photos from the event:

Mindy Scheier shows a short introductory video about Runway of Dreams before opening the floor to questions.

A menu of the speciality cocktails served during the event.

The charcuterie board served at the event.

The entrance to the event.

The bar during the event.

The crowd gathers in the main room for cocktails and appetizers.

15 Habits of Self-Made Millionaires

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Goals, inspiration, Professional Development, Strategy, Success

Success doesn’t crop up overnight. All self-made millionaires had to start somewhere.

Much of their transformation from ordinary to seven-figure status can be attributed to “rich habits,” a term coined by Thomas C. Corley, who spent five years researching the daily habits of 177 self-made millionaires.

“From my research, I discovered that daily habits dictate how successful or unsuccessful you will be in life,” he writes in his 2016 book “Change Your Habits, Change Your Life.”

“There is a cause and effect associated with habits. Habits are the cause of wealth, poverty, happiness, sadness, stress, good relationships, bad relationships, good health, or bad health.”

The good news is all habits can be changed, Corley notes. Here are some “rich habits” of self-made millionaires that you can start developing today:

They read consistently.
The rich would rather be educated than entertained. As Corley writes, “Eighty-eight percent of the rich devote thirty minutes or more each day to self-education or self-improvement reading … Most did not read for entertainment … The rich read to acquire or maintain knowledge.”

Corley found that they tend to read three types of books: biographies of successful people, self-help or personal development, and history.

Continue reading the original article on Business Insider…

4 Questions Successful People Ask Themselves

Filed under: Self Reflection, Success

Wouldn’t it be fun to be an eccentric billionaire?

Riding your unicorn, the wind in your yacht, giving away tons of money for the powers of good (and maybe spending some of it on yourself?).

It could also be fun to be so successful that you have no major money or house worries, and every day you wake up to a job you love.

Either way, success smells good, doesn’t it? But how do you get there?

You can read the interwebs and find all sorts of interesting information on what successful people do in the morning, or how they structure their day, or even—wink—the questions that they ask themselves.

Why the focus on questions? Well, there are many schools of thought on this but if I can borrow from Appreciative Inquiry, one of the reasons that questions are so important is because “words create worlds.”

What that means is that the questions you choose to ask yourself have a direct impact on the world you create for yourself.

Click here to read the rest on Motto >>