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Category: Societal Shifts

Why Freelancing Will Be Part of Nearly Everyone’s Future

Filed under: Hiring, Societal Shifts

Whether you’re hiring or getting hired, plenty of evidence points to a future workforce which looks much different than it does today.

Much has been written about the gig economy–a future in which traditional full-time jobs are displaced by mostly short-term contracts or freelance work. But whether or not the rise of freelancing will be a bad or good thing is certainly debatable. The New York Times recently published an op-ed piece titled “The Gig Economy’s False Promise,” while a Wired headline reads “The Gig Economy: The Force That Could Save the American Worker?” Regardless of your feelings on the subject, plenty of evidence points to a future workforce which looks much different than it does today. That’s according to Stephen DeWitt, CEO of Work Market, an enterprise-class platform for the management of contract and freelance talent. Here are his thoughts about why freelancing will touch nearly everyone in the years to come, whether you’re looking for help, or getting hired yourself.

1. Many crystal balls are showing the gig economy to be a real thing.
More than 55 million people–about 35 percent of the U.S. workforce–did some kind of freelance work last year. Experts agree this number will only continue to climb. According to the Intuit 2020 Report (PDF) in just a few years traditional employment will no longer be the status quo. More than 80 percent of large companies say they will be significantly increasing their use of flexible workers. And, the number of contingent workers–freelancers, temps, part-time workers and contractors–will exceed 40 percent of the U.S. workforce by 2020.

Continue reading the original article on Inc…

Thought Leadership: Marketing & Investor Relations Search Update

Filed under: Hiring, Insights, Societal Shifts, trends, Uncategorized

In the link below please find our Q4 Thought Leadership piece entitled Asset Management Marketing & Investor Relations; Hiring Insights for a Changing Landscape Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.

This paper is designed to update you on market movement, hiring insights, and the expansion of our Marketing & Investor Relations Search Practice here at Solomon Page.

Briefly, here is an excerpt from our Thought Leadership paper forecasting Q4 and 2017 hiring trends…

  • While the demand for client-facing professionals remains strong, we believe new marketing hires will be sector specific, as opposed to mass hiring, particularly systematic and private strategies.
  • There will likely be a continued decrease in consultant relations and product specialist roles, as firms will expect senior marketers to cover those responsibilities. Consultant relations and product specialist roles are expensive hires, and have the potential to be ultimately viewed as cost centers.
  • Junior and midlevel client-facing investor relations roles will continue to be a strong area for recruitment to support the senior hiring boom over the past two years, predominantly in credit.
  • Private strategies will likely become the focus in asset management recruiting for marketing roles, as the asset base is more stable, and investors are no longer shying away from locking up money.
  • Long/short equity hiring will make a comeback. There has been virtually no hiring in the space for the past 3 years, and turnover and retooling are inevitable.

Whether you and your company are seeking a recruitment partner to address your hiring needs, or you are looking for more color on potential opportunities, we look forward to answering your questions.

Written by Alexis DuFresne

Click here to read the complete article >>

Why do Employers Expect More of Entry-Level Employees than Ever Before?

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication, Hiring, Societal Shifts

When Grinnell College senior Ham Serunjogi began his first internship at an environmental technology accelerator in 2013, he was shocked by how much was expected of him in his first days on the job, and how little school had prepared him for entering the workforce.

“In my first meeting with the executive director, he was asking me about what classes I had taken, and he asked if I had taken a database class in college, and I did, and he said, ‘Okay, good, then you can oversee this project of designing and implementing a new communication database for us,” he says. “That was the first time I was ever brought into a project I had little or no knowledge about, and was expected to deliver results.”

Serunjogi soon realized that there was an expectation for him to learn on the fly, and to make a meaningful contribution early on in his internship. And this past summer, Serunjogi began an internship at Facebook, where expectations were even higher.

“Facebook is a very fast moving culture,” he says. “There’s an expectation that you come in and you learn how to catch up with everyone else, otherwise you slow down the entire organization.”

According to a recent study by Harris Poll, commissioned by education-technology company Fullbridge, 27% of the 319 executives surveyed said they form an opinion of entry-level employees in less than two weeks, and 78% decide in less than three months whether or not that employee will be successful.

Click here to read the rest on Fast Company >>

Millennials Want You to Get to the Point

Filed under: ideas, Insights, Millennials, Societal Shifts

“5 reasons” this, “14 ways” that, “23 times when”… It’s how millennials consume information today, mircomedia, and I have to say I am as guilty as the next guy. It’s a race to get to the point.

As marketers, we are rushing to get our point across too. We tell ourselves, “If we don’t get their attention, it doesn’t matter what the content is!” But when is the last time you personally changed your mind or did something new by engaging with one of these split second pieces of info?

The rush is great, but it has to lead to something more.

We’ve wired our brains digest micro-size information. The second we open an article we are immediately looking for the main points. Listicles, eight-second Snapchats that we rapidly click through, Instagram videos–remember when we wondered who would ever watch a six-second video? We even scroll through our phone while our favorite TV show is on.

Click here to read the rest on INC >>

Urgency in the Millennial Workforce – Possible!

Filed under: Attitude, Professional Development, Social Impact, Societal Shifts

One of the great struggles leaders face is creating urgency in their followers to strive towards organizational goals. A problem that becomes quickly compounded when those followers are millennials and new to their career field. They are dipping their feet into the waters of the “real world” and generally far more committed to finding a job rather than selecting one they’re fully invested in. This creates a unique set of challenges for the leader trying to build urgency in their team. Here are some suggested techniques to implement:

1. Be Chatty – have frequent, consistent conversation with your millennial team members. They have come up in an age and culture where communication never ceases, so become part of it. Utilize different mediums until you learn their patterns and preferences, and be sure to make your conversations about more than just work. Having open lines of communication will allow you to check in on their progress toward goal achievement frequently and will stimulate proactive conversation from them. Knowing they will be talking to you daily will naturally increase the urgency to achieve progress.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

The Big Flip is Coming – More Men Staying Home

Filed under: Role Reversals, Societal Shifts

As American society and our economy continue to evolve, some clear trends are starting to emerge. Sometimes societal changes remain muted because they cause discomfort as old, powerful norms shift.

One of these shifts is the increasing number of men who stay at home with kids while moms bring home the bacon. Filmmaker Izzy Chan is producing an important documentary on this topic. Ben Mangan agreed to serve as an adviser to the project because he thinks it’s critical we start discussing what this means for Americans – from the way it redefines family to the way it ought to shape good public and employer policies relating to parenthood.

The first thing you should know about the big flip — it’s big. 40% of American working wives now already out-earn their husbands (Pew Research 2012). In 40% of American families (with kids under 18), mom is the breadwinner (Pew Research 2013). In fact, the Boston Consulting Group has gone so far as to predict that in 15 years, women will not just close the income gap with men — but out-earn them.

Click to read the interview on LinkedIn >>