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Category: Rational Thought

You Can Love What You Do for a Living, but Still Think it Feels Like Work

Filed under: Attitude, Focus, Professional Development, Rational Thought, Self Reflection

Do what you love, and you’ll never work another day in your life.

Yes, we’ve all heard that sentiment countless times. We repeat it to recent graduates like it’s the only career advice they’ll ever need. We print it on motivational posters, bumper stickers, and encouraging note cards. We incorporate it into commencement addresses. Heck, I’m sure it’s even embroidered on the occasional throw pillow.

But, does this treasured piece of advice even ring true? Will finding a career that you’re insanely passionate about make your entire life feel like one big tropical vacation?

No, I don’t think so. In fact, I think it’s perfectly normal to love your job and simultaneously recognize the fact that it’s hard work.

That’s right—just because you sometimes feel stressed, overwhelmed, or even a little tired doesn’t mean that you’re in the wrong line of work. Here are four facts that debunk that infamous (and misleading) proverb.

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20 Things Your Boss Will Love To Hear and Why

Filed under: Best Advice, Career Advice, Good Habits, Quick Tips, Rational Thought

Looking to make a good impression with a new boss or improve your relationship with your current manager? Try adding a few of these powerful phrases into your conversations. You can easily improve your standing with your boss without being insincere or being thought a brown-noser.

  1. How can I help?
    This is probably the number one thing managers like to hear. (The opposite would be, “That’s not my job.”) It shows you’re a team player and willing to pitch in, even outside your specific job duties.
  2. Not a problem.
    When your manager asks you to do something, be positive about it. Make her feel confident that you’ll address the task without her having to micromanage
  3. I’d like to learn more.
    Indicating to your boss that you’re interested in things outside your area of expertise is a great way to show that you’re serious about moving up in the company or your career. It shows ambition and even an understanding of your own shortcomings, which is appealing when you’re willing to address them.

 

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Would You Hire You? 10 Ways To Add Value To Your Position At Work.

Filed under: Rational Thought, Role Reversals, Success, Your Career

Whether you receive a paycheck signed by someone else, run a company with scores of employees or work for a small organization, there is a value placed on your position. By going the extra mile, being the best you can be and contributing to a positive environment you add value. On the other hand, intentional or not, are you bringing a negative attitude to work, passing the buck a bit too often and doing the minimum to get by? If so, your value as an employee will be significantly lower. There is a relationship between your value at work and the probability of getting a raise, a promotion, extra perks and bonuses on the job. With all of the benefits associated with higher value, why anyone would choose to lower their value at work is beyond me. Simply put, it is your choice. You are directly responsible for your value, the exchange rate and your happiness at work.

Have the courage to give an honest answer: Would you hire you?

Ask yourself this question and have the courage to give an honest answer: Would you hire you? If words like passionate, excited, motivated and inspired describe you, you probably will get the gig. If, however, you are struggling to find the right words that fit or more importantly, if you are saying to yourself, “I would be positive, passionate, motivated and inspired by my work, but…(fill in the blank),” chances are good you wouldn’t get a call back or a second interview for the position. Excuses will not help boost your value, only action will.

Here are 10 questions that will help determine your value at work:

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Not All Advice is Good Advice

Filed under: Professional Development, Quick Tips, Rational Thought, Strategy

What to do when you don’t like the advice you have been given.

Making decisions is part of the life of a small business owner. You make so many decisions every day, it becomes second nature. As your business grows, you face challenges and decisions outside your comfort zone. When that happens, it’s wise to look to others for advice and information. Over the years I have turned to my husband, brother, employees, friends, other business owners and paid professionals for advice.

Sometimes the advice is great, and other times, it just doesn’t feel right. When that happens to you take a minute before you decide to ignore the advice and ask yourself a few tough questions.

Why don’t you like the advice?

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Your Kindness Will Lead You to Success

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Personality, Rational Thought, Social Impact

I am not impressed by someone’s ability to intimidate, cajole, persuade, manipulate, overpower or overwhelm others. No, what impresses me most are the people who have the ability to do these things, but who choose instead to let kindness lead them to success.

Once upon a time, a colleague of mine – frustrated by an assistant who couldn’t move as fast as he wanted – pulled her into his office and unleashed five minutes of verbal abuse before he fired her. She ran out in tears, and he came out with a big smile. “That felt SO good,” he said.

He viewed this incident as a success. I saw this as evidence that he was kind to people only as long as they did exactly what he asked. Otherwise, he cared not one whit about them.

It’s easy to yell and threaten, but these behaviors are signs of weakness, not strength. Strong people don’t lose control of their emotions. Skilled fighters say that once you lose your temper, you have lost the fight. Your vision narrows and you become dangerously impulsive. If losing your temper is a weakness for fighters, it is a deadly flaw for professionals.

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Want to Be Successful? Get Angry

Filed under: Attitude, Professional Development, Rational Thought, Your Career

We’re human, every single one of us. We feel happy, and sometimes we feel smart. Other times we feel stupid. We enjoy feeling loved. We cringe when we feel hated. We all get angry for sure. Some handle it better than others. Sometimes in my life I’ve been quick to anger.

Throughout my entire career I’ve been told that I should never get angry. I’ve been advised that it’s a negative emotion that shouldn’t enter the workplace. However, when I look back at my biggest wins, my most impressive accomplishments have all started with the same common denominator.

I got angry.

I didn’t let it control me. I felt it. I tried to identify what it was that had pushed my buttons, and I went about solving that conflicting emotion. I find that getting angry (in a controlled sense) has helped me. I think it can help you too.

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Why Can’t We All Just Get Along – In the Office

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Insights, Office Politics, Rational Thought

For most working people, we spend more time at work than we do at home, so it’s important to have healthy relationships with the people we work and interact with, including employees, managers and customers. Dealing with personalities, moods and egos can be tricky. Since we can’t change them, then we must look to ourselves to be the lead in creating the most healthy environment to foster strong relationships. Here are some tips to help you put your best foot forward:

Be a Can-Do Person

Being positive is the first commandment of any relationship. Your attitude can be your biggest attractor or detractor. There are going to be off days, and these moments are more defining of your character than the smooth, trouble-free times. Anyone can handle good days well, but how do you handle bad days?

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