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Category: Organization

WWD EXCLUSIVE: Solomon Page Acquires E.A. Hughes & Co.

Filed under: ambition, Big Ideas & Innovation, Branding, Communication, company culture, Company News, Job Market, Leadership, News, Organization, Solomon Page, Uncategorized, Women Leaders

The deal bolsters Solomon Page’s position in retail and fashion c-suite searches.

As seen in WWD.

By David Moin on January 28, 2019

Solomon Page, a $185 million staffing and executive search firm servicing 14 different sectors, has acquired E.A. Hughes & Co., a retained executive search firm.

“Our primary driver of growth historically has been organic,” said Lloyd Solomon, a founding partner and managing director of Solomon Page. “We attract experienced people, add to the team and build our service offerings. But selectively, when we see something we consider unique and special and circumstances coincide, we will do an acquisition and incorporate their team into ours to create a bigger family and better services for clients.

“We’ve done about four acquisitions over our 28-year history, in health-care executive search, the publishing search space, in the legal staffing world and technology,” Solomon said. “E.A. Hughes really extends our reach in the fashion retail consumer goods space and becomes a division. They retain their group, and operate autonomously and collaboratively with our existing fashion team.”

Solomon added that E.A. Hughes’ expertise in c-suite searches complements Solomon Page’s strength in full-time recruitment and freelance hiring, thereby providing Solomon Page with a “broader” approach.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The E.A. Hughes team of eight will continue to be led by Elaine Hughes, who founded E.A. Hughes & Co. in 1991. The boutique executive search firm has been serving the retail, apparel, footwear, beauty, home and e-commerce sectors, among others.

She reports to Solomon, and joins Solomon Page’s fashion and beauty division, led by managing directors Sue Lamoreaux and Patty Hoban Scott.

“Elaine has influenced the careers of many senior executives in retail and fashion and advocated for women in the industry by example and involvement in many organizations during the past three decades,” Lamoreaux said.

Hughes underscored the “synergies” accomplished by combining the two firms, and that the deal gives Solomon Page a broader scope of talent acquisition encompassing Csuite executive search, mid-level searches, as well as staff jobs such as sales associates.

As Hughes sees it, inadequate search is a big factor behind the industry’s high rate turnover at the c-suite level. Many search firms, she suggested, neglect conducting the proper “deep dive” into the candidate’s functional talents, experience and E.Q. to determine whether he or she is a good fit for the organization doing the recruiting and its culture. “No one really assesses it all,” Hughes said.

Recently, Lisa Berger, formerly with the 24 Seven recruitment agency, joined Solomon Page to launch its beauty segment.

“In the ever-evolving landscape of human capital and business models, our goal is to adapt to shifts in the marketplace and create a multifaceted approach to our clients,” Solomon said.

The New York-based Solomon Page, founded in 1990, has 275 employees, 10 offices in the U.S., and one in London. Scott Page is also a founding partner in the company and managing director.

Solomon Page Changes the Recruitment Landscape for Fashion, Retail, and Beauty Markets

Filed under: ambition, Communication, company culture, Company News, innovation, Job Market, Leadership, News, Organization, Press Release, Recruiting & Hiring, Solomon Page, Success, Thought Leadership, Women Leaders

The Company Acquires Retained Executive Search Firm E.A. Hughes & Co.

NEW YORK, NY, January 28, 2019 – Solomon Page, a specialty niche provider of staffing solutions and executive search, announces the acquisition of E.A. Hughes & Co., a leading retained executive search firm servicing the retail and consumer markets. Founded by Elaine Hughes in 1991, E.A. Hughes & Co. has advised clients in their strategic growth initiatives through a unique and comprehensive approach to the search process.

The E.A. Hughes team will continue to be led by Elaine Hughes and will join the Fashion & Beauty Division of Solomon Page, led by Sue Lamoreaux and Patty Hoban Scott in the full-time and freelance fashion markets, respectively. This will further complement the excellent reputation the company holds both geographically and strategically.

“I am thrilled by the synergy this acquisition will provide to each of our clients,” said Elaine Hughes. “It will allow the team to deliver unpreceded talent acquisition encompassing the C-suite executive placements to temporary hires from a single source”.

Sue Lamoreaux adds, “We are very excited to have the opportunity to partner with Elaine and her team. She has influenced the careers of many senior executives in retail and fashion and advocated for women in the industry by example and involvement in many organizations during the past three decades.”

Simultaneously Solomon Page has increased its capabilities in the beauty segment, recently adding Lisa Berger to the team to spearhead the expansion. Ms. Berger has a proven track record in strategic talent acquisition and will advise beauty brands as they seek to build their organizations, in addition to providing relevant content and access to diverse channel partnerships.

“In the ever-evolving landscape of human capital and business models, our goal is to adapt to shifts in the marketplace and create a multi-faceted approach to our clients,” said Lloyd Solomon, Founding Partner and Managing Director of Solomon Page. “Our existing footprint coupled with E.A. Hughes’ established presence uniquely qualifies us as a progressive and forward-thinking brand in the new world of the retail, fashion, and beauty industries. Additionally, our strong and longstanding relationships in the financial services and private equity communities, led by Founding Partner and Managing Director Scott Page, uniquely position our firm as a strategic partner and advisor during this transformational time in the industry.”

How to Boost Productivity During the Dog Days of Summer

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Distractions, Focus, Good Habits, Organization, Productivity, Quick Tips, Strategy

You may have loved your job when you started, but it’s not unusual to get in a rut. If you’re experiencing burnout, changing your mindset can bypass it, says Daniel M. Cable, author of Alive aWork: The Neuroscience of Helping Your People Love What They Do, during his interview with Stephanie Vozza of Fast Company.

“Our brains are not wired for routine and repetition at work,” he says. “Disengagement isn’t a motivation problem; it’s a biological one.”

Cable was a professor at the University of North Carolina when he says he lost his zest for his own job and slowly descended into boredom. After being diagnosed and treated for Hodgkin lymphoma, his perspective changed, and he found a sense of gratitude for his job. He stumbled on research about the part of the brain called the ventral striatum, also called the “seeking system,” and its role in being your best self.

“This part of our brain urges us from the time we’re babies to explore what we don’t know,” he says. “Little kids can be given an awesome toy with noises and buttons and they’ll be really into it for a week or few days. Then they find something else that hadn’t seen before, like car keys, and they find that way more interesting. It wasn’t because the thing is cool; it’s because the thing is new.”

When we succumb to these urges, our brain delivers dopamine to reward us and that makes us feel more alive, and the same thing can happen at work, says Cable, currently a professor of organizational behavior at London Business School.

“When we’re in the rut of routine for the 502nd time, this part of the brain shuts off,” says Cable. “Your brain is saying, ‘You’re better than this. We’re not built of this. We’re built for bigger things.’ Then the brain stops the release of dopamine, which makes it seem not only boring but that it takes forever.”

There are three ways you can trigger your brain release dopamine, and get out of your rut, says Cable.

1. Play to your strengths

Identify your signature strengths and the impact you can have by using them on a daily basis. “How can you bring value to the team by using your unique strength?” asks Cable.

When he started tapping into his strength—humor—Cable says he regained an appreciation for his job. “It made me feel good and I saw my students lean in when I used humor,” he says. “As a professor, it was something unique to me. I decided to bring it when I teach class instead of leaving it at home.”

Think of your job as a flexible vehicle and determine how you can bring your strength to it.

2. Be willing to experiment

Avoid the risk of routine by shaking things up. Cable decided to develop new classes instead of teaching the same class over and over.

“A sales manager who was promoted and never got a chance to get out in the field might start going into the field again to talk to clients,” suggests Cable. “It’s just a way to refresh and learn new things.”

Activate that seeking system by going outside of your comfort zone, suggests Cable.

3. Tap into purpose

Finally, analyze cause and effect in your role. We all want to see the impact of our actions, says Cable. Leaders can help employees personalize the purpose of work by providing direct conversations with the people who use work as well as internal decision makers.

“Try to think about the story you want to tell yourself about why you do your job,” says Cable.

You can read the rest of the article on Fast Company.

Office Organization Tips to Help You Work More Productively

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Good Habits, Organization, Productivity

More than half of the people surveyed in an Express Employment hiring trends survey said they lose nine work hours a week due to lack of organization; 57 percent said they lose six work hours a week because of a lack of time due to disorganization, reported Corp Magazine.

Clutter happens to the best of us you get a report in and it goes on your desk (on top of the several papers already awaiting your review).

You attend a trade show and all those gadgets from the exhibitors you couldn’t resist taking home pile up in the back of a drawer.

What you may not realize is, clutter affects the brain. When your environment is cluttered, the chaos restricts your ability to focus, cited unclutterer as a paraphrase to a Princeton University study.

Organizing your office does not need to be a big project it’s quite simple when you keep up with it. Here’s how to get started.

Click here to read the rest on Business.com >>