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Category: Job Search

LEAP HR Recap

Filed under: Efficiency, Hiring, ideas, innovation, Job Search

This past week, members of our Healthcare & Lifesciences division attended the LEAP HR Healthcare conference in Chicago, IL. At the event, senior leaders in the healthcare industry shared insights on best practices in the workplace.

On day one, President & Global Practice Leader of Solomon Page Healthcare & Lifesciences, Marc Gouran, spoke at an afternoon session about leveraging new technology to transform the ways to find great healthcare talent. The discussion highlighted how to properly utilize new-school technology and old-school methodology to be effective in executive recruiting.

During the first portion of the session, Marc discussed how searches were completed in the past when recruiters did not have access to modern tools and technologies. The process was, as follows:

  • Meet with the client and get a detailed understanding of company and job
  • Become a subject matter expert in the specific function
  • Bring together a search team
  • Complete primary research, and produce a list of target companies and individuals to recruit
  • Utilize the rolodex, directories, internal database, and pre-existing relationships to educate oneself, recruit, and receive referrals
  • Personally reach out to potential candidates
  • Evaluate candidates via phone and in-person meetings
  • Submit the best candidates to the client and facilitate interviews

This process results in the selection of a new executive, who will then be onboarded.

Although this process was effective at the time, technology soon presented alternative tools that made a significant impact within the recruiting space. These tools include, but are not limited to:

Due to the impact technology had, and continues to have, on the industry, executive search has changed significantly. Research, name generation, interviews, evaluation, assessment, and background checks have all been affected by this change. With that said, there is limited privacy and more information available to the public than ever before. With new technology, there are wider talent pools available through job aggregators and contact databases, AI-assisted communication, and an easier candidate experience. Although this can be extremely beneficial, we must not lose sight of old methodology that brought the industry to where it is today.

So what is better? Old methodology or new technology? Marc Gouran had the following to say:

  • Find the best candidates, not just the ones “looking for a job”
  • Combine comprehensive primary research with the tools to reach out quickly
  • Attract the passive candidates who are excelling within their jobs
  • Use the deep experience and track record of success to be a true partner to the client company or institution
  • Fully and completely evaluate candidates, focusing on diversity, cultural fit, and functional skills
  • Create a search process that is efficient and works for all stakeholders
  • Bring together the best of the “old” rigor, energy, and focus, along with the “new” tools and technologies

Whether you have an internal recruiting team or hire an external search firm, make sure to incorporate all fundamental components, both old and new. With that will come lasting relationships that will contribute to the success of both the organization and its employees.

4 Metrics Recruiters Love to See on Resumes

Filed under: Job Market, Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring, Resume Tips, Strategy

For one, “we know that the human eye processes numbers faster than words,” career expert J.T. O’Donnell said in an interview with Glassdoor. But beyond that, they also “help me as a recruiter give context to the size and scope of the work that you did,” O’Donnell explains.

In any given workday, though, there’s no shortage of specific numbers you could call out: the amount of emails you send, the amount of meetings you attend, the amount of projects you work on. So how do you know which metrics to include?

Glassdoor uses the following four-step framework in their Job Seeker’s Toolkit to help you decide which numbers pack the most punch. Once you add the right metrics throughout your resume, don’t be surprised if the interview offers start rolling in!

1. Growth: What did you add to the company?

When deciding which metrics to include, it’s important to think about the key performance indicators, or KPIs, for your role. For example, salespeople are often assessed on how much revenue they drive, how many new clients they bring in, how many of their customers renew, etc. Whatever your role, think about the numbers that matter most for you: perhaps they’re ones that your boss brings up in weekly meetings, that you find in your performance review, or even that you see in the LinkedIn profiles of people with the same job title as you.

Of these different metrics, think about which ones represent ways you added to the company and helped it grow. Depending on your role, this might include:

  • Website visits
  • Revenue
  • Deals closed
  • Partnerships secured
  • Candidates hired
  • New technologies/processes adopted

Examples:

  • Authored 150 articles over the course of one year, driving 500,000 unique website visits
  • Vetted and reached out to roughly 30 prospects per day, resulting in 20 closed deals in Q1 and $120,000 in revenue (+22% to quota)
  • Optimized 15 landing pages during the course of the internship, resulting in 17% lift in organic search traffic

2. Reduction: What did you help the company save?

In many cases, what you help your company reduce or eliminate can be just as important as what you add to it. In fact, certain roles focus their energy entirely on helping companies save or reduce in order to operate more efficiently. Think about whether you have a concrete way to measure how you’ve helped your company save or reduce the following:

  • Time
  • Budget
  • Client turnover
  • Employee turnover
  • Website bounce rate

Examples:

  • Identified three major bottlenecks in the hiring process and spearheaded taskforce to implement new technologies and strategies to overcome them, resulting in 31% faster time-to-hire
  • Led website architecture redesign, leading to a two-second faster load time and 16.5% decrease in bounce rate
  • Conducted internal budget audit and discovered five key areas of redundant spending, saving $23,000 per year

3. Impact: How many people did your work help?

A great way to illustrate how much value you can add to a company is by showing them how many people you’ve previously helped. This doesn’t just have to be people outside of your company like users or clients; it can also include those within your company. Look through the following “people” metrics, and think about which ones might be relevant to your role:

  • Number of team members you’ve led
  • Number of users or customers your work impacted
  • Number of stakeholders involved in a project
  • Number of clients you managed
  • Number of employees you supported (for a function like IT or HR)

Examples:

  • Coached, mentored and led a team of seven direct reports on the factory floor to ensure top-notch quality of products used by millions of consumers
  • Conceptualized and executed a multi-touch blog, social and email marketing campaign that reached 200,000 unique impressions
  • Oversaw both day-to-day and strategic HR operations for a company of 75 people

You can continue reading this article on Glassdoor.

7 Ways to Show Emotional Intelligence in a Job Interview

Filed under: Attitude, Interviews, Job Market, Job Search, Personality, Professional Development

Yes, having solid technical skills is important in landing a job, but maybe not as important as you might think. In fact, in a survey of more than 2,600 hiring managers and human resource professionals, 71% stated they valued emotional intelligence in an employee over IQ. What’s more, 75% said they were more likely to promote a highly emotionally intelligent worker; and 59% claimed they’d pass up a candidate with a high IQ but low emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is going to be even more relevant for job hunting in the future too, the Future of Jobs Report from The World Economic Forum ranked emotional intelligence in the top 10 job skills required for 2020. Since more companies are paying attention to hiring people with high emotional intelligence, if you’re looking for a job it’s an important skill to demonstrate in your interview.

Here are 7 ways that to demonstrate emotional intelligence in a job interview:

1. Actively listen

Instead of focusing on a response to the question being asked, give all your attention on the question itself. Don’t give in to the urge that you have to answer the question immediately. Interviewers are looking for a thoughtful response, instead of an immediate one that indicates that you are giving them an answer that you have rehearsed. Repeat the question back in your own words to make sure that you understand it the way that it was intended. If you are not sure if you are answering the question ask the person asking it.

2. Show emotions

Many interviewees, due to nervousness, can came come across as wooden and tightly controlled. It’s not only okay to show some emotion, but the right emotions will form a connection between the interviewer and you. Smiling, as long as it doesn’t appear forced or inauthentic, is always good. Showing enthusiasm and some excitement is also good if it is real. The caveat is not to force any emotions. If the interviewers get a whiff that you are coming across as someone other than yourself, it will cause them to mistrust you and decrease your chances of getting the job.

3. Share the credit for your achievements

Take a cue from professional athletes when they are interviewed after a win or achievement. They always credit their team mates, their team, rather than taking personal accolades. When asked about a project that you are proud of, or that was successful, be sure to share credit with the team, unit, and others who were involved in the project. Make it clear that you are proud to be a member of the group that was involved in the success. This gives more credibility to you being a team player, than if you simply claim that you are, which everyone does.

4. Share how you are trying to improve yourself

The typical advice for answering a question about your weakness is to frame it as something that is actually a strength. For example, claiming to be a perfectionist, or becoming too involved in your job, which can be seem as strengths by an employer. These answers do not cut it any more, as interviewers are looking for something more substantial. When disclosing a weakness be sure to indicate what you are actively doing to work on it and give examples of making progress. Interviewers know that we all have weaknesses and suspect that we may try to hide those in the interview. As long as your weaknesses do not raise any red flags, being honest, open and genuine will help gain their trust and respect.

5. Don’t shy away from talking about conflict

For the question about your strengths, rather than only focusing on your qualifications or technical ability, talk about your ability to work well with others in a teamwork setting. Your ability to adapt to change or setbacks and work well with coworkers and customers is important to bring up. Instead of simply mentioning these things, be prepared to come up with examples of when you had to use those skills. Perhaps there was conflict within your unit or you had to deal with an irate customer. Talk about how you used your soft skills to effectively deal with these situations.

You can read the rest of this article on Fast Company.

3 Times It Makes Sense to Take a Career Risk

Filed under: Career Advice, Decision Making, Goals, Job Search, Professional Development

In most situations, it makes sense to play it safe. Don’t cross the street without looking both ways, and never drive a car without wearing a seat belt. Both of those things make sense because there’s no upside to making the dangerous choice.

When it comes to your career, though, sometimes it does make sense to take risks. You shouldn’t be foolish or take risks just for the sake of it, but there are situations when the safe choice limits your upside.

If you take a risk and fail, you can always get another job. The prospect may seem scary, but if you take enough smart, well-considered risks, then hopefully some will work out for you.

When Your Integrity Is on the Line

Jason Hall: There are plenty of times when the best thing to do at work is “keep your head down” and focus on the work. Whether it’s avoiding office politics (or discussing real politics), gossip or correcting your boss when it would only cause you to catch their ire, these can be “high-risk, low return” situations that are best avoided. And there are other times it may go either way if there’s a real risk you could do permanent damage to your reputation if you have a plan or idea that fails.

However, there should be a red line when it comes to your integrity. This is because, in my experience, an employer or coworker who asks you to start letting “little” things slide will eventually expect you to start ignoring — or possibly even hiding — bigger things. And sometimes these can mean breaking the law and becoming an accomplice to a crime. Of course, it’s important to consider context here, but in general, it should be pretty obvious when you’re starting down a dangerous path.

But if you always make a point to be honest in your dealings with your employer, peers and clients, you can avoid a slippery slope that can ruin careers and lives. The bottom line is, no job is more important than your integrity. If you have to break rules or lie or commit crimes to stay employed, you’re risking a lot more by trying to stay with that company.

When You’ve Saved for It

Maurie Backman: I’m the first person to encourage others to pursue their dream careers, because having done so myself, I know how rewarding it can be. I worked at a hedge fund for almost five years after college, all the while wanting to move over to something more creative. When I finally took the leap, I knew it would involve a major pay cut, and I was OK with that. The reason? I had savings to back myself up.

We spend so much time at work that we deserve to be doing things we love. At the same time, we can’t neglect our bills. If you know you want to switch careers, or take a similar risk that might result in a drop in income, go for it — but save some money first. When I went from collecting a steady paycheck to freelancing, I knew it would take time to build up a client base, and so I saved enough to ensure that even if I didn’t earn a dime during my first six months of independent work, I’d be OK.

It’s brave to take a career risk, but it’s unwise to compromise your near-term and long-term financial security in the process. So don’t. Save money to buy yourself the option to take that risk. This way, you can approach your new venture head on without having the stress of getting evicted or running up credit card debt holding you back.

When You’re Stuck in a Dead-End Position

Daniel B. KlineA few years ago I was working as the editor of two small — some would say dying — local newspapers. My boss was a nice enough guy but we had differing philosophies on local news. I believed in cramming as many local stories in the paper as possible. He believed in spending as little money as he could.

It wasn’t a bad job, but it was dead-end. If I stayed I was never going to get a meaningful raise, a promotion (there was nothing to promote me to) and it was unlikely my boss would come around to my thinking as to how we could get back to growth.

I wanted to leave and could have left for better newspaper jobs. That, however, would have likely been trading the headache I knew for a different one. Instead, I joined a friend of mine and started a business.

You can read the rest of the article on Glassdoor.

7 Tips to Rebrand Yourself for an Industry Switch

Filed under: Branding, Career Advice, Confidence, Goals, Job Market, Job Search, Professional Development, Your Career

Ready for a career change, but worried you don’t have the experience or skills to land a job in your desired field? Filling your resume with your previous work experience that has no similarity to the job you’re applying for is likely to land your resume in the trash can. But that doesn’t mean you’re stuck in a career you hate forever.

Dawn Graham, PhD, career coach, psychologist, and author of the book Switchers: How Smart Professionals Change Career–and Seize Success, says rebranding your professional experience is key to a successful career switch. “When you’re making a switch, you need to be a good fit for the role, and while some of your skills and experiences may be transferrable, many may not be,” she says. Here’s how you can prove that you’re worthy of the title, even when your resume shows no previous experience in the field.

1. Change your social presence

Use social media to your advantage to rebrand yourself in your new career area. Follow thought leaders in your target industry and comment on their posts. Connect with relevant industry groups and associations, share relevant and interesting articles within your online network, comment on posts, attend the biggest industry conferences, and develop a network of contacts in the industry. “Technology makes it easier than ever to market yourself in a way that appeals to the audience you choose,” says Graham. The more you can demonstrate that you’re serious and invested in your new target industry, the more credible you will seem.

2. Find your transferrable skills

Rebranding yourself takes time and introspection. Everyone has transferrable skills, even if you think you don’t. Graham gives the example of a recruiter who wants to move into social media marketing. “You can show off your customer research, analytics, and technical savvy skills,” she says. Demonstrating how you can reach new customers using the same skill set you used to uncover qualified candidates is a way to prove that your experience is relevant.

To determine your skills, Graham recommends breaking down achievements. “If you contributed to saving a large client, consider the steps that got you to that result–perhaps problem solving, diplomacy, creativity, and influencing.” Do the same with other accomplishments and you’ll soon notice a pattern of core strengths. Try going through this exercise with a colleague or manager who may be able to see strengths that you are overlooking.

3. Do your research

In order to find out what skills and experiences are most relevant to your new career choice, spend time learning as much as you can about your target position. Speak with professionals in your target industry, look for volunteer positions in the industry, take courses, and attend professional events to learn what experiences and skill sets are most valuable in the new industry.

4. Don’t lead with your title

While most of us use our job title when introducing ourselves, this can be an error when you’re switching careers. Many companies use language that doesn’t translate outside the industry. A title can cause confusion for someone in another industry, and biases their opinion toward your application. They may think right away that you’re not a good fit without reading further into your experiences. Instead of focusing on your title, place the emphasis on your value–the skills you developed in that position.

5. Know your audience

In order to highlight your value and position yourself as a good fit for the job, you need to know the challenges the hiring manager is trying to solve. “Many job seekers have incredible accomplishments, but without knowing what is important to your audience, you risk leading off with accomplishments that, while impressive, lead the hirer to think you’re not a fit for the role,” says Graham.

When in a job interview, make one of your first questions about the challenges the company or department is facing at this time. Once you find out the hiring company’s pain points, you can select the achievements from your background that best align with what the hiring manager is looking for in the role.

6. Cherry-pick experiences

Some of your best accomplishments and achievements may not be impressive to the hiring manager if they have no relation to the job you’re applying for. To be most effective in rebranding yourself professionally, select the parts of your experience that align most closely with your target role. To make your application in this new field stronger, highlight these experiences in your LinkedIn profile.

If hiring managers are reviewing your resume and then jump over to LinkedIn and see a whole different type of experience highlighted, they may be confused and cause them to put aside your resume. Rebranding your professional experience may mean dropping what you think are some of your best accomplishments, but by focusing on “fit” first, you will have a better chance of a recruiter recognizing you as a potential candidate for the position.

7. Justify the switch

“Every hiring manager wants to know why this job at this company at this time,” says Graham. Your answer to this question will be especially important if you’re a career switcher.

New York City Applicants Have One Less Thing to Worry About

Filed under: Hiring, Job Search, News

Today, New York City becomes the first city in the United States to prohibit employers from inquiring about job seekers’ and job applicants’ salary histories. Signed into law earlier this year, New York joins a handful of other cities and states (among them California, Massachusetts, Oregon, Delaware, Philadelphia, and San Francisco) across the country that voted to ban employer questions about salary history. New York will be the first municipality to enforce the law.

The new law was introduced by Public Advocate Letitia James in August 2016, due in part to the findings of a gender pay gap analysis conducted earlier that year. As James put it, “We want to end…discrimination, and banning questions about salary history is a critical first step.” The New York City law is intended to help reduce the differences that women and minorities earn relative to their male and Caucasian counterparts. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, women earn 80 cents for every dollar that men earn, and in New York, women earn $5.8 billion less than men in wages each year, according to a report by New York City’s Public Advocate’s office, a disparity that’s even greater for people of color (with black women making just 55 cents and Hispanic women earning just 45 cents of every dollar earned by a white man).

While there are multiple explanations for the gender pay gap, laws prohibiting employers from taking pay history into account may help reduce the impact of historical salary discrimination. Effective today, employers will no longer be able to:

  • Ask job applicants questions about or solicit information in any way about applicants’ current or prior earnings or benefits, including on job application forms
  • Ask applicants’ current or former employers or their employees about applicants’ current or prior earnings or benefits
  • Search public records to learn about applicants’ current or prior earnings or benefits
  • Rely on information about applicants’ current or prior earnings or benefits to set their compensation

The law will be enforced by the NYC Commission on Human Rights and apply to both private and public sector employers and covers internships, contractor roles, part-time and full-time positions.

Continue reading on Forbes

How to Ask About Promotions in a Job Interview Without Sounding Arrogant

Filed under: Career & Money, Interviews, Job Search

When you sit down for a job interview, it’s perfectly natural to want to know how you’ll be compensated now and in the future. After all, the average job candidate in the United States stays in the job for which they were hired for about four years. After that, it’s time to move up or move on.

But how do you ask about promotions in an interview without making it look like you’re going to move on quickly? Or without coming across like you think you deserve a better job right from the start?

It can be an uncomfortable conversation, but there’s no opting out. In order to choose the opportunity that best fits your career plans, you need to have accurate information about the position. That conversation must involve a glimpse of what promotions and raises might look like if you were to accept a job offer.

Here are three effective questions to help you ask about promotions in an interview without looking presumptuous:

1. ASK, “HOW DO YOU HELP GOOD PERFORMERS GROW IN THIS POSITION?”
Companies attract competitive candidates by offering growth opportunities. It’s very likely that the company you’re interviewing with will want to highlight its efforts to help employees grow and evolve through professional development, education, or experience opportunities.

Continue reading the complete article on Fast Company >>

You’re Invited: Legal Services Candidate Open House

Filed under: Goals, Hiring, Interviews, Job Search, Legal, Networking, Recruiting & Hiring, Temp Work, Your Career

YOU’RE INVITED

Solomon Page Legal Services Candidate Open House
Wednesday, May 17th
1:00pm – 4:00pm

Join the Solomon Page team to enjoy light refreshments while registering for exciting upcoming legal opportunities. We have new projects every week, and are eager to meet document review attorneys of all levels. Registering with Solomon Page is an important first step for consideration. Informative group sessions will be held to discuss the benefits and the resources provided to our exclusive community.

Added bonus! Brush up your resume with Legal Services East Coast Managing Director Julie Favetta, who will be hosting Resume Workshops throughout the day. These workshops give you exclusive access to over 20 years of experience working with clients and placing candidates at Top 50 Law Firms and Fortune 500 Companies.

To confirm your attendance, please RSVP before May 14th by emailing RSVP@solomonpage.com with your resume attached and preferred time slot: 

1:00PM – 1:30PM
1:45PM – 2:15PM
2:30PM – 3:00PM
3:15PM – 3:45PM
Space is limited and we will only be able to meet with individuals that RSVP with their resume to the email address noted above. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Business Insider Interviews Alexis DuFresne about Wall Street Hiring Trends

Filed under: Hiring, Job Search

Business Insider spoke with six Wall Street recruiters to uncover today’s hottest trends in hiring. Among those interviewed was Alexis DuFresne, a Managing Director of the Financial Services division at Solomon Page. Below, you’ll find an excerpt from the article.

It’s moving season on Wall Street.

Bonuses have landed in bank accounts, freeing up bankers and traders to move to new employers. Big people moves on Wall Street often occur around this time of year.

With that in mind, we asked six Wall Street recruiters about the big trends in hiring.

Here’s what the recruiters had to say.

“I tell candidates to give themselves six months to a year to find the right role.” – Alexis DuFresne, Solomon Page

Systematic funds are doing the most hiring in volume on the analyst and portfolio manager side, while systematic and private capital strategies are driving marketing hires. Facing redemptions last year, we saw that our clients had a surprising increase in compensation for marketing and investor relations roles, as the asset retention and business development functions were recognized as highly influential on the health and stability of the funds for which they represent.

While search is highly cyclical, the value add to asset managers is how to help them innovate. So even while assets may decrease or performance may slow, wise managers are constantly looking to identify and attract talent in any market condition and sub-strategy to give them a competitive edge, and maybe even at a discount if they recruit at the bottom of the market. As an example, long-short equity may be at an all-time slowdown in performance, with some funds coasting on management fees. However, if a manager sees an excellent portfolio manager candidate, they may make room for the candidate.

Read the complete article on Business Insider…

Wagner College Q&A with Gregg Gavioli

Filed under: Career Advice, Hiring, Job Search, Professional Development

Wagner College invited Gregg Gavioli, Managing Director of the Accounting & Finance division at Solomon Page, to speak to their top 5% of business students, known as “Selects,” at a round table event. The discussion covered the job market, networking, and the finance industry and provided upcoming graduates with an intimate opportunity to ask questions and learn about working as a professional in the accounting and financial industries.

Below is a Q&A excerpt from this meeting.

1. What types of jobs within the industry are threatened the most by the rise of financial technology?

Operations roles. Clearing, customer service, trade execution. Anything that can be automated, off shored, or moved to a lower cost center. If you are open to relocation, many major banks have large service centers in places like Salt Lake, Baltimore, Tampa, Jacksonville, Dallas, and Tennessee. If you are flexible, there can be opportunity there for you.

 

2. Is our generation really worse off than our parents in terms of earning potential?

I don’t think so. Wages are rising. The main point of difference may be if you are carrying student debt. My advice is live frugally for your first 5 years. Don’t eat out often. Make coffee at home. Live with many roommates or parents where possible. Start a 401k as soon as you can.

 

3. The finance industry is overwhelming. I have 2 months until graduation and still have no idea what I want to do. What is my best strategy from this point forward?

You may not know what you want to do any time soon. That’s OK. Field as many interviews and get as many job offers as you can. Take the one that has the most opportunity to learn many things closely aligned with your interest. Learn what you like and what you don’t like in that first job and use it to find your next. You will likely need to do this a few times before you know what “your field” is.  Find something your passionate about, and it will not feel like a job. You don’t want to be watching the clock waiting for the end of the day to run out the door. If it feels that way all the time, change fields.

 

4. What is the single most important quality that you are looking for in an applicant? Particularly a Wagner student going up against the Ivy League?

Ability to communicate effectively. Make eye contact. Is there a fire in your belly? Do I want you on my team? Do you know excel at a high level?

 

5. What do you believe is the best way to write a cover letter to get yourself noticed and receive a response? What should be included? Length?

One page, always customize it, mention why you are the perfect candidate for the role.

 

6. What entry level positions should we be looking for to put ourselves in the best position for a greater opportunity down the road?

Any one that puts you in a positon to learn. Be open to figuring things out on your own. Ask for more work when you need it. Compliance and analytics roles offer long term opportunity as well as anything that can make you a subject matter expert where you can transition to a Project manager or a Business Analyst at some point.

 

7. What areas of the finance industry are up and coming and what areas of the industry do you see dying out within the next 10 years?

Compliance. Big Data, Projects Management, Business Analytics, Analytics, Ad-tech. Analytics related to Advertising, Social Media, and Search engines is an exciting field to explore for finance majors.

 

8. What career paths would you recommend for a finance major, aside from the traditional banking route?

Compliance, analytics, quant, advertising data analysis, FPA, Budget.

 

9. How did you go about expanding your network

Use LinkedIn. Did you create a profile? Have you joined the Wagner Alumni group I created on LinkedIn?  Send a customized email to any Wagner Alumni who may be working at your target company who may be open to meeting you for coffee for advice or helping you with applications. Professional and social groups. HS Groups. Skills Group like compliance, advertising, accounting clubs (IMA, AICPA) etc.

 

10. Did you get a master’s Degree and if so when did you get it.

No. If you are not getting it right away, see if you can get tuition reimbursement from a big employer. It’s most important when advancing up the ladder into management roles and has the biggest payoff there.

 

11. What are your recommendations on preparing for a meeting with a mentor?

Research the mentor. Come prepared with questions based on their background. Use their time wisely.

 

12. What is the most effective way of preparing for an interview?

Research the Company, research interviewer’s profiles, have multiple different questions prepared for different people. Up to 10 questions is not too many. Never say I have no questions at all.

 

13. How can I ensure follow up after an application?

You can’t really but send a customized thank you note, if no response one more check in email is OK and that is the max. Have a thank you note ready to go after the interview in a stamped envelope and drop in the post office box near the company.

For upcoming graduates, our expert recruiters are equipped with the advice and contacts to help jumpstart your professional career. Get in touch today and learn more about our service offerings.