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Category: Job Market

4 Metrics Recruiters Love to See on Resumes

Filed under: Job Market, Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring, Resume Tips, Strategy

For one, “we know that the human eye processes numbers faster than words,” career expert J.T. O’Donnell said in an interview with Glassdoor. But beyond that, they also “help me as a recruiter give context to the size and scope of the work that you did,” O’Donnell explains.

In any given workday, though, there’s no shortage of specific numbers you could call out: the amount of emails you send, the amount of meetings you attend, the amount of projects you work on. So how do you know which metrics to include?

Glassdoor uses the following four-step framework in their Job Seeker’s Toolkit to help you decide which numbers pack the most punch. Once you add the right metrics throughout your resume, don’t be surprised if the interview offers start rolling in!

1. Growth: What did you add to the company?

When deciding which metrics to include, it’s important to think about the key performance indicators, or KPIs, for your role. For example, salespeople are often assessed on how much revenue they drive, how many new clients they bring in, how many of their customers renew, etc. Whatever your role, think about the numbers that matter most for you: perhaps they’re ones that your boss brings up in weekly meetings, that you find in your performance review, or even that you see in the LinkedIn profiles of people with the same job title as you.

Of these different metrics, think about which ones represent ways you added to the company and helped it grow. Depending on your role, this might include:

  • Website visits
  • Revenue
  • Deals closed
  • Partnerships secured
  • Candidates hired
  • New technologies/processes adopted

Examples:

  • Authored 150 articles over the course of one year, driving 500,000 unique website visits
  • Vetted and reached out to roughly 30 prospects per day, resulting in 20 closed deals in Q1 and $120,000 in revenue (+22% to quota)
  • Optimized 15 landing pages during the course of the internship, resulting in 17% lift in organic search traffic

2. Reduction: What did you help the company save?

In many cases, what you help your company reduce or eliminate can be just as important as what you add to it. In fact, certain roles focus their energy entirely on helping companies save or reduce in order to operate more efficiently. Think about whether you have a concrete way to measure how you’ve helped your company save or reduce the following:

  • Time
  • Budget
  • Client turnover
  • Employee turnover
  • Website bounce rate

Examples:

  • Identified three major bottlenecks in the hiring process and spearheaded taskforce to implement new technologies and strategies to overcome them, resulting in 31% faster time-to-hire
  • Led website architecture redesign, leading to a two-second faster load time and 16.5% decrease in bounce rate
  • Conducted internal budget audit and discovered five key areas of redundant spending, saving $23,000 per year

3. Impact: How many people did your work help?

A great way to illustrate how much value you can add to a company is by showing them how many people you’ve previously helped. This doesn’t just have to be people outside of your company like users or clients; it can also include those within your company. Look through the following “people” metrics, and think about which ones might be relevant to your role:

  • Number of team members you’ve led
  • Number of users or customers your work impacted
  • Number of stakeholders involved in a project
  • Number of clients you managed
  • Number of employees you supported (for a function like IT or HR)

Examples:

  • Coached, mentored and led a team of seven direct reports on the factory floor to ensure top-notch quality of products used by millions of consumers
  • Conceptualized and executed a multi-touch blog, social and email marketing campaign that reached 200,000 unique impressions
  • Oversaw both day-to-day and strategic HR operations for a company of 75 people

You can continue reading this article on Glassdoor.

7 Ways to Show Emotional Intelligence in a Job Interview

Filed under: Attitude, Interviews, Job Market, Job Search, Personality, Professional Development

Yes, having solid technical skills is important in landing a job, but maybe not as important as you might think. In fact, in a survey of more than 2,600 hiring managers and human resource professionals, 71% stated they valued emotional intelligence in an employee over IQ. What’s more, 75% said they were more likely to promote a highly emotionally intelligent worker; and 59% claimed they’d pass up a candidate with a high IQ but low emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is going to be even more relevant for job hunting in the future too, the Future of Jobs Report from The World Economic Forum ranked emotional intelligence in the top 10 job skills required for 2020. Since more companies are paying attention to hiring people with high emotional intelligence, if you’re looking for a job it’s an important skill to demonstrate in your interview.

Here are 7 ways that to demonstrate emotional intelligence in a job interview:

1. Actively listen

Instead of focusing on a response to the question being asked, give all your attention on the question itself. Don’t give in to the urge that you have to answer the question immediately. Interviewers are looking for a thoughtful response, instead of an immediate one that indicates that you are giving them an answer that you have rehearsed. Repeat the question back in your own words to make sure that you understand it the way that it was intended. If you are not sure if you are answering the question ask the person asking it.

2. Show emotions

Many interviewees, due to nervousness, can came come across as wooden and tightly controlled. It’s not only okay to show some emotion, but the right emotions will form a connection between the interviewer and you. Smiling, as long as it doesn’t appear forced or inauthentic, is always good. Showing enthusiasm and some excitement is also good if it is real. The caveat is not to force any emotions. If the interviewers get a whiff that you are coming across as someone other than yourself, it will cause them to mistrust you and decrease your chances of getting the job.

3. Share the credit for your achievements

Take a cue from professional athletes when they are interviewed after a win or achievement. They always credit their team mates, their team, rather than taking personal accolades. When asked about a project that you are proud of, or that was successful, be sure to share credit with the team, unit, and others who were involved in the project. Make it clear that you are proud to be a member of the group that was involved in the success. This gives more credibility to you being a team player, than if you simply claim that you are, which everyone does.

4. Share how you are trying to improve yourself

The typical advice for answering a question about your weakness is to frame it as something that is actually a strength. For example, claiming to be a perfectionist, or becoming too involved in your job, which can be seem as strengths by an employer. These answers do not cut it any more, as interviewers are looking for something more substantial. When disclosing a weakness be sure to indicate what you are actively doing to work on it and give examples of making progress. Interviewers know that we all have weaknesses and suspect that we may try to hide those in the interview. As long as your weaknesses do not raise any red flags, being honest, open and genuine will help gain their trust and respect.

5. Don’t shy away from talking about conflict

For the question about your strengths, rather than only focusing on your qualifications or technical ability, talk about your ability to work well with others in a teamwork setting. Your ability to adapt to change or setbacks and work well with coworkers and customers is important to bring up. Instead of simply mentioning these things, be prepared to come up with examples of when you had to use those skills. Perhaps there was conflict within your unit or you had to deal with an irate customer. Talk about how you used your soft skills to effectively deal with these situations.

You can read the rest of this article on Fast Company.

Solomon Page Recognized as One of the Largest Staffing Firms in the U.S.

Filed under: Awards, Company News, Job Market, News, SPG News

Solomon Page has been recognized as one of the Largest Staffing Firms in the U.S. by Staffing Industry Analysts for the fifth consecutive year.

“The 143 companies included in this year’s report generated a combined revenue of $83.6 billion and had an estimated 58.6% of market share,” said Barry Asin, President of SIA. “These organizations stand out for their sizable operations, impressive achievements and as industry leaders in today’s competitive and dynamic ecosystem.”

Ranked by revenue, the report covers firms that generated at least $100 million in US staffing revenue in 2017. This is SIA’s 23rd annual report on the largest US staffing firms.

“Due in part to the favorable economic environment over the past year, this year’s report highlights the degree to which many large staffing firms continue to grow via both organic initiatives and strategic acquisitions,” said Timothy Landhuis, Director of Research at SIA.

You can read SIA’s press release and review the full list here.

7 Tips to Rebrand Yourself for an Industry Switch

Filed under: Branding, Career Advice, Confidence, Goals, Job Market, Job Search, Professional Development, Your Career

Ready for a career change, but worried you don’t have the experience or skills to land a job in your desired field? Filling your resume with your previous work experience that has no similarity to the job you’re applying for is likely to land your resume in the trash can. But that doesn’t mean you’re stuck in a career you hate forever.

Dawn Graham, PhD, career coach, psychologist, and author of the book Switchers: How Smart Professionals Change Career–and Seize Success, says rebranding your professional experience is key to a successful career switch. “When you’re making a switch, you need to be a good fit for the role, and while some of your skills and experiences may be transferrable, many may not be,” she says. Here’s how you can prove that you’re worthy of the title, even when your resume shows no previous experience in the field.

1. Change your social presence

Use social media to your advantage to rebrand yourself in your new career area. Follow thought leaders in your target industry and comment on their posts. Connect with relevant industry groups and associations, share relevant and interesting articles within your online network, comment on posts, attend the biggest industry conferences, and develop a network of contacts in the industry. “Technology makes it easier than ever to market yourself in a way that appeals to the audience you choose,” says Graham. The more you can demonstrate that you’re serious and invested in your new target industry, the more credible you will seem.

2. Find your transferrable skills

Rebranding yourself takes time and introspection. Everyone has transferrable skills, even if you think you don’t. Graham gives the example of a recruiter who wants to move into social media marketing. “You can show off your customer research, analytics, and technical savvy skills,” she says. Demonstrating how you can reach new customers using the same skill set you used to uncover qualified candidates is a way to prove that your experience is relevant.

To determine your skills, Graham recommends breaking down achievements. “If you contributed to saving a large client, consider the steps that got you to that result–perhaps problem solving, diplomacy, creativity, and influencing.” Do the same with other accomplishments and you’ll soon notice a pattern of core strengths. Try going through this exercise with a colleague or manager who may be able to see strengths that you are overlooking.

3. Do your research

In order to find out what skills and experiences are most relevant to your new career choice, spend time learning as much as you can about your target position. Speak with professionals in your target industry, look for volunteer positions in the industry, take courses, and attend professional events to learn what experiences and skill sets are most valuable in the new industry.

4. Don’t lead with your title

While most of us use our job title when introducing ourselves, this can be an error when you’re switching careers. Many companies use language that doesn’t translate outside the industry. A title can cause confusion for someone in another industry, and biases their opinion toward your application. They may think right away that you’re not a good fit without reading further into your experiences. Instead of focusing on your title, place the emphasis on your value–the skills you developed in that position.

5. Know your audience

In order to highlight your value and position yourself as a good fit for the job, you need to know the challenges the hiring manager is trying to solve. “Many job seekers have incredible accomplishments, but without knowing what is important to your audience, you risk leading off with accomplishments that, while impressive, lead the hirer to think you’re not a fit for the role,” says Graham.

When in a job interview, make one of your first questions about the challenges the company or department is facing at this time. Once you find out the hiring company’s pain points, you can select the achievements from your background that best align with what the hiring manager is looking for in the role.

6. Cherry-pick experiences

Some of your best accomplishments and achievements may not be impressive to the hiring manager if they have no relation to the job you’re applying for. To be most effective in rebranding yourself professionally, select the parts of your experience that align most closely with your target role. To make your application in this new field stronger, highlight these experiences in your LinkedIn profile.

If hiring managers are reviewing your resume and then jump over to LinkedIn and see a whole different type of experience highlighted, they may be confused and cause them to put aside your resume. Rebranding your professional experience may mean dropping what you think are some of your best accomplishments, but by focusing on “fit” first, you will have a better chance of a recruiter recognizing you as a potential candidate for the position.

7. Justify the switch

“Every hiring manager wants to know why this job at this company at this time,” says Graham. Your answer to this question will be especially important if you’re a career switcher.

The Top 10 Jobs That Are Disappearing in the U.S.

Filed under: Job Market, Job Statistics, News

With the rise of robots and AI, as well as ongoing economic changes from globalization, jobs from data entry to manufacturing are under threat in the US.

These are the top 10 jobs that could be on their way out in the US, based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projections for the percent decline in the number of people in these occupations between 2016 and 2026, along with descriptions of the jobs from the Department of Labor’s O*NET careers database.

You can read the rest of this article on Business Insider, and review their entire list of the top 41 jobs that are projected to decline in the US.

 

1. Locomotive firers

They monitor locomotive instruments and watch for dragging equipment, obstacles on rights-of-way, and train signals during run.

Median annual pay, 2017: $60,360

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 1,200

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 300

Projected decline: 78.6%

 

2. Respiratory therapy technicians

They provide respiratory care under the direction of respiratory therapists and physicians.

Median annual pay, 2017: $50,350

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 10,800

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 4,700

Projected decline: 56.3%

 

3. Parking enforcement workers

They patrol assigned areas to issue tickets to overtime parking violators and illegally parked vehicles.

Median annual pay, 2017: $39,030

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 9,400

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 6,100

Projected decline: 35.3%

 

4. Word processors and typists

They use computers, word processors, or typewriters to type letters, forms, reports, or other material.

Median annual pay, 2017: $39,740

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 74,900

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 50,100

Projected decline: 33.1%

 

5. Watch repairers

They repair, clean, and adjust mechanisms of timing instruments, such as watches and clocks.

Median annual pay, 2017: $35,770

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 1,800

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 1,200

Projected decline: 29.7%

 

6. Electronic-equipment installers and repairers (motor vehicles)

They install, diagnose, or repair communications, sound, security, or navigation equipment in motor vehicles.

Median annual pay, 2017: $34,530

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 12,100

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 9,000

Projected decline: 25.6%

 

7. Foundry mold and core makers

They make or form wax or sand cores or molds used in the production of metal castings in foundries.

Median annual pay, 2017: $35,140

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 12,500

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 9,500

Projected decline: 24.0%

 

8. Pourers and casters (metal)

They operate hand-controlled mechanisms to pour and regulate the flow of molten metal into molds to produce castings or ingots.

Median annual pay, 2017: $38,210

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 8,400

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 6,500

Projected decline: 23.4%

 

9. Computer operators

Computer operators monitor and control electronic computer and peripheral electronic data processing equipment.

Median annual pay, 2017: $44,270

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 51,500

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 39,700

Projected decline: 22.8%

 

10. Telephone operators

They provide information to telephone customers by accessing alphabetical, geographical, or other directories.

Median annual pay, 2017: $36,320

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 9,100

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 7,000

Projected decline: 22.6%

The Power of Culture in the Workplace

Filed under: company culture, Job Market, Job Statistics, Professional Development, Work-Life Balance

Corporate culture is a concept at the forefront of the employment marketplace—professionals want to feel valued as individuals, not just for their professional contributions.

In order to ensure a fulfilled and productive workforce, employers should build a strong culture to enhance employee morale; this translates to defining the organization’s mission and core values, as well as creating a sense of community amongst employees through professional and personal development.

Our 2018 Market Insights Report shows the impact culture has on professionals from the moment they consider a position through the lifecycle of employment.

1. The Offer: Our study shows that following compensation, corporate culture and work-life balance are the most important factors to consider in a job offer. And while respondents agree that salary is the most significant determinant in accepting an offer, nearly half (40%) of jobseekers would take a position that did not meet their financial expectations but with a company that promotes culture and professional development.

2. Engagement: In this candidate-driven market—the U.S. unemployment rate is below 4%, the lowest in 18 years—hiring quality professionals is only the beginning. In addition to attracting talent, companies must keep their workforce engaged. Our study shows that while people value the financial and tangible aspects of employment—compensation, insurance, 401(k)—they equally value professional growth and fulfillment.

3. Job Satisfaction: We can assume that, to jobseekers and tenured employees alike, culture may not be regarded as the most important aspect of a job, but it is certainly an unequivocal determinant. 93% of all respondents agree that it is important to have a sense of belonging and shared values with their organization. Our results show there is strong correlation between culture and job satisfaction:

    • of the professionals who claimed they fit in ‘very well’ with their culture, 77% were satisfied at their job;
    • of the respondents who fit in ‘somewhat,’ 62% were satisfied;
    • and of the people who didn’t fit in, only 33% were happy in their roles.

4. Retention: As challenging as it is to attract talented professionals, retention is equally as essential. In today’s competitive marketplace companies must invest in retaining top talent, as turnover is not only costly but impacts morale and employee engagement. Culture is a key factor in employee retention—of the people we surveyed who were planning a job change within the next year, only half (50%) noted a positive company culture, compared to the professionals who weren’t planning a job change, of which 90% reported alignment with company culture.

Our study concludes that positive company culture vastly benefits both employers and employees—your external brand is only as strong as your internal culture. In order to perform well employees need to feel appreciated, engaged, and aligned with their company’s mission and core values.

It’s crucial for companies to build and enhance culture for the well-being and productivity of their workforce, as clients will never love a company until the employees love it first. Ultimately, business improves along with employee morale: low turnover, as well as increased motivation, translates to positive results.

 

Stay tuned for more insights where we will reveal steps employers can take to successfully implement a positive company culture and productive work environment.

Jobs with the Biggest Salary Increases in 2018

Filed under: Economy, Job Market, Job Statistics

You would think some of the more sophisticated job titles would realize the biggest increases in wages, but according to Glassdoor’s latest ranking of jobs showing the fastest wage gains over the past year, it is job positions in lower-skill, lower-paying fields that are seeing the most growth.

Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist of Glassdoor said: “Today’s strong labor market may be starting to improve pay across the income spectrum.” He also noted, “April’s pay gains are the fastest we’ve seen in 2018 so far.”

Out of 84 job titles, here are the Top 10 jobs with the fastest year-over-year growth in median base pay for full-time employees:

  1. Financial Advisor: $55,296 (up 6.4%)
  2. Bank Teller: $30,066 (up 5.5%)
  3. Attorney: $101,817 (up 4.7%)
  4. Truck Driver: $53,878 (up 4.5%)
  5. Delivery Driver: $38,955 (up 4.4%)
  6. Web Developer: $65,414 (up 3.9%)
  7. Network Engineer: $71,433 (up 3.6%)
  8. Cashier: $27,923 (up 3.4%)
  9. Web Designer: $51,875 (up 3.4%)
  10. Security Officer: $35,321 (up 3.3%)

As you can see, the wage growth for lower-paying positions like cashier and delivery driver saw very healthy increases. Financial advisor managed to stay in the top spot as those positions require a lot of communication and people skills (which is harder to automate), according to the report.

As for jobs with the least amount of wage growth, here’s what took last place:

  1. Professor: $86,166 (down 3.3%)
  2. Communications Manager: $65,882 (down 2.5%)
  3. Quality Engineer: $71,467 (down 1.5%)
  4. Bartender: $31,668 (down 1.4%)
  5. Maintenance Worker: $39,907 (down 1.4%)
  6. Research Assistant: $30,391 (down 1.2%)
  7. Technician: $45,318 (down 1.1%)
  8. UX Designer: $76,003 (down 0.9%)
  9. Project Manager: $73,575 (down 0.6%)
  10. Consultant: $72,120 (down 0.6%)

The decrease in pay for professors shows the financially unfortunate state of higher education institutions in this country.

You can read the rest of the article here on Ladders.