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Category: Good Habits

Why Food, Sleep and Exercise are Critical to Success

Filed under: Decision Making, Good Habits, Success, Work-Life Balance

Small changes can make a huge difference

How we care for our bodies affects our performance at work. Skipping your twice weekly workout because you believe you are strapped for time leads to negative habits that impact your overall happiness and productivity. Similarly, ordering fast food instead of cooking to save the hassle of buying groceries and preparing your own meals hurts more than it helps.

Here are three arguments that will convince you to pay more mind to the way you eat, sleep and exercise.

1. Good food nourishes the body and powers a strong mind

Did you know that certain foods make you smarter? For entrepreneurs, the best brain-healthy foods include beets, fish, berries, lean protein and walnuts. Eat these to improve your concentration, focus, memory and sharpness. Also, to sleep well, try things like MCT oil, krill oil or raw honey before bed.

Click here to read the rest on Time >>

How to Blow Your Boss’ Mind

Filed under: Career Advice, Good Habits, Professional Development, Strategy

We all want to get ahead. Still, even when it seems you’re doing everything right—you’re never late to work, rarely take a sick day, and always meet deadlines—promotions can be few and far between.

You’re putting the work in, so why aren’t you getting rewarded? The answer is simple: you don’t get promoted for fulfilling your boss’s expectations.

Your boss’s expectations are the price of entry. Even if you’re making a great effort and doing all that’s asked of you, you won’t stand out. You’ll be seen as someone who completes the minimum requirements, and no one who builds a great career is seen this way.

The trick to advancing your career and getting paid more is to add value by making certain your contributions are worth more than you’re paid. You want to go above and beyond so that you’re seen as someone highly valuable—someone the organization can’t live without.

You should aim to exceed your boss’s expectations so much that he feels like he’s the smartest guy in the world for hiring you.

This isn’t as hard as it sounds. In fact, you can blow your boss’s mind in seven easy steps.

Click here to read the rest on Entrepreneur >>

30 CEOs Reveal the Daily Habits Responsible for Their Success

Filed under: Attitude, Career Advice, Good Habits, inspiration, Success

Look at any CEO running a profitable company and you’ll find someone who has figured a few things out. One trait many of these leaders have in common: consistency. Check out these quotes from 30 successful CEOs regarding the daily habits that help them get ahead in business and life.

1. Try one new thing each day.
“Every day, I force myself to do something that is out of my comfort zone. If I hadn’t left my comfort zone back in 2008 to buy that one-way ticket to Buenos Aires, I never would have met my business partner, Aaron Firestein, and BucketFeet would never exist.”

–Raaja Nemani, co-founder and CEO of BucketFeet, a footwear brand that was founded in 2011 after a chance meeting between two travelers. It has grown from one hand-decorated pair of shoes to a brand that has collaborated with over 20,000 artists in more than 100 countries.

2. Don’t do bad days.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

5 Best Practices for Handling Conference Calls like a Boss

Filed under: Communication, Good Habits, Professional Development, Quick Tips, Strategy, Technology

The art of conference calling… Wait, you didn’t know it was an art? It’s definitely a skill worth building if you’re running a modern business and as much an art as any other form of presenting. Whether you want to blame it on technology and the Internet, the costs associated with flying, etc., the conference call has become a huge part of doing business and you can’t escape it.

Here are the top five ways to be the best at conference calls.

1. Smile

The way you deliver information is the key to capturing your audience’s attention. How you talk on the phone is no different from how you present yourself on stage when speaking to an audience.

In reality, your conference call is very similar to being on stage where the lights are so bright you can’t see anyone’s face. Smile while you speak and your positive energy will come through — the people on the other end of the phone will be able to sense it.

Click here to read the rest on Mashable >>

7 Challenges Successful People Overcome

Filed under: Attitude, Career Advice, Decision Making, Good Habits, Professional Development, Success

It’s truly fascinating how successful people approach problems. Where others see impenetrable barriers, they see challenges to embrace and obstacles to overcome.

Their confidence in the face of hardship is driven by the ability to let go of the negativity that holds so many otherwise sensible people back.

Martin Seligman at the University of Pennsylvania has studied this phenomenon more than anyone else has, and he’s found that success in life is driven by one critical distinction—whether you believe that your failures are produced by personal deficits beyond your control or that they are mistakes you can fix with effort.

Success isn’t the only thing determined by your mindset. Seligman has found much higher rates of depression in people who attribute their failures to personal deficits. Optimists fare better; they treat failure as learning experiences and believe they can do better in the future.

Click here to read the rest on Entrepreneur >>

6 Ways to Reduce the Stress of Presenting

Filed under: Career Advice, Communication, Good Habits, Professional Development, Stress

In the past 30 years, I’ve given more than 3,000 speeches to audiences across the world. Presentations have been such a central part of my work that many who know me best have been surprised to learn how much anxiety they used to cause me. After my fourth root canal, my dentist pointed out that I appeared to be grinding my teeth at night. He suggested a mouth guard. Over the next few years, I ground through three of them. Fortunately, materials science advanced faster than my grinding and I eventually received a more durable one. Still, I had almost resigned myself to the fact that fitful sleep, restless legs, and a variety of aches throughout my body were the price of the career I had chosen.

I knew I had turned a corner 10 years ago when I was invited to speak to a prestigious business audience at Radio City Music Hall. I slept peacefully the night before. And when I stepped through the crimson curtains to face 6,000 nattily dressed executives, my former panic and dread were replaced with a sense of exhilaration and gratitude.

As I came to realize that presentations would be a permanent facet of my career, I began accumulating tactics to increase my pleasure while reducing the pain. Here are six that have made an enormous difference for me:

Click here to read the rest on Harvard Business Review >>

How Positivity Makes You Healthy and Successful

Filed under: Attitude, Decision Making, Good Habits, Happiness, Psychology, Success

When faced with setbacks and challenges, we’ve all received the well-meaning advice to “stay positive.” The greater the challenge, the more this glass-half-full wisdom can come across as Pollyannaish and unrealistic. It’s hard to find the motivation to focus on the positive when positivity seems like nothing more than wishful thinking.

The real obstacle to positivity is that our brains are hard-wired to look for and focus on threats. This survival mechanism served humankind well back when we were hunters and gatherers, living each day with the very real threat of being killed by someone or something in our immediate surroundings.

That was eons ago. Today, this mechanism breeds pessimism and negativity through the mind’s tendency to wander until it finds a threat. These “threats” magnify the perceived likelihood that things are going—and/or are going to go—poorly. When the threat is real and lurking in the bushes down the path, this mechanism serves you well. When the threat is imagined and you spend two months convinced the project you’re working on is going to flop, this mechanism leaves you with a soured view of reality that wreaks havoc in your life.

Click here to read the rest on TalentSmart >>

How to Be More Likable in 10 Easy Steps

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication, Good Habits, Professional Development, Relationships, Success

Have you noticed there are people who always seem to be more likable?

In a recent episode of the new ABC drama Mind Games, one of the characters mentions an interesting personality trait that defines the most popular people: They more readily admit their weaknesses rather than waiting for them to be revealed over time. The show is about using cunning tricks to manipulate others and ensure a positive outcome, so it’s a bit ridiculous, but there’s truth in the observation.

In the office, it’s possible to exhibit traits that help you to be more likable. In my years as a corporate manager and developing my writing career, I’ve noticed when people appear more likable, and I’ve tried to develop these traits myself. Here are a few to cultivate.

1. Ask questions.
I’ve noticed people who ask questions are often well liked. It’s human nature to be helpful, and we all have a great desire to share what we know. When someone appears to need our help, we tend to like him or her more, because we like being the one who provides the answers.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

10 Tips For People Who Hate Networking

Filed under: Attitude, Career Advice, Communication, Good Habits, Networking, Professional Development

Do you associate networking with shameless self-promotion and ‘more = more’? Does that make your stomach turn? Me too!

Networking has a bad reputation as a forum for superficial small talk. Yet real networking is about establishing mutually beneficial, lasting connections, one person at a time. And with my modern approach to networking, even you can shine and thrive at a board meeting, convention, or free-floating cocktail party.

The reason so many of us hate networking – and profess to stink at it – is because we’ve been futilely following the wrong rules. Rules that only work for a paltry 15% of the population and require us to be phony – a sure fire way to short circuit.

Click here to read the rest on Careerrealism >>

4 Really Dumb Ways to Make Decisions That Derail Your Success

Filed under: Career Advice, Cognitive Ability, Decision Making, Good Habits, Professional Development, Psychology

Whether in business or in life, we all tend to have different perceptions of, or biases about, the people and circumstances around us.

There’s a degree of truth in the saying “perception is reality” but there are at least four false perceptions or biases that hinder our relationships, growth and success.

1. Associative bias.
This is a fancy term for linking unrelated events, patterns or outcomes together. While many innovators and entrepreneurs thrive and build successful enterprises making connections that other people don’t see, that’s a different type of mental leap than an associative bias.

An example of associative bias is throwing out the garbage, then realizing you can’t find your keys. The obvious reaction of many people in that situation is, “Oh my God, I threw my keys away!” They start pawing through the trash, when in fact they actually left their keys on the counter.

This is a time-wasting bias that causes unnecessary delays and rework.

Click here to read the rest on Entrepreneur >>