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Category: Career & Money

Career Advice for College Graduates

Filed under: accountability, ambition, Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Best Advice, Career & Money, Career Advice, Communication, Decision Making, Goals, Good Habits, Quick Tips, Skills, Success

Most of the best career advice isn’t learned in school or discussed during formal annual reviews. They’re the priceless nuggets of wisdom you tend to learn through the school of hard knocks instead – sometimes too late. One of the best gifts that seasoned leaders can give to college graduates is practical, candid feedback on what they really need to know to succeed in the “corporate jungle.”

In classic David Letterman style, here are my top 10 career advice tips for college graduates and early career professionals:

#10 Build relationships before you need them

Don’t wait until you need something to have a substantial discussion with your team leader or other key executives. A crisis is a real buzz kill for relationship building so avoid building relationships in the midst of a crisis and instead build them before you need them. Director of Columbia University’s Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Programs, Beth Fisher-Yoshida discusses the importance of relationship building in 5 Ways to Develop More Meaningful Relationships at Work.

#9 Learn your boss’ communications preferences early and adapt to them

When you adjust your style to better fit your manager’s communication/work style preferences, you become easier to manage – and that’s a good thing! This becomes even more important when you encounter that unavoidable “difficult boss” which research shows will likely happen at some point. Learning effective managing up techniques can mean the difference between success and failure when faced with a challenging boss personality.

#8 Don’t hide your awesome

Inexperience can be an asset so use it! Don’t hold back on sharing a completely different idea or approach, or questioning if there might be a better way. Your lack of “experience” could be the key to innovation so leverage that. If you’ve developed a template for tracking incoming orders or have used an amazing app for researching vendors, share that with your team. If there’s momentum around an area where you have expertise, don’t be afraid to volunteer to lead the effort. Remember that you don’t have to know everything to take lead on a project or task.

#7 Become the go-to person for something valuable

I like to say it’s not just “what you know and who you know” but also “who knows you and what you’re known for.” Becoming known as the Prezi, Slack or Sharepoint expert not only builds your organizational credibility, but it also creates demand for your participation in a wide range of projects that you may not have otherwise had exposure to. Stay attuned to the high demand skill sets in your industry or organization and develop deep skills in an area that is highly valued. If you become known as the resident Prezi expert in the company, you might find yourself working directly with the EVP on her upcoming board presentation and that one on one face time can prove invaluable. Over time you’ll want to be careful not to become pigeon-holed into one particular skill set, but building extreme competency in a few areas early is virtually always a smart move.

#6 Fiercely manage your personal brand

Just as the brands Tiffany, Coke and McDonalds evoke very specific sentiments as you think about them, your name has the same impact when others hear it. Decide what you want people to think about when your name is mentioned, then get about the business of building and managing your personal brand. Whether it’s your dress, lunch buddies, cell phone ring or email syntax, remember that with every choice you’re reinforcing your personal brand. Joseph Liu’s 5 Ways to Build Your Personal Brand At Work insists that brand building isn’t just for executives; it’s for everyone.

To read the full article by Dana Brownlee, visit it here at Forbes.com.

How to Ask About Promotions in a Job Interview Without Sounding Arrogant

Filed under: Career & Money, Interviews, Job Search

When you sit down for a job interview, it’s perfectly natural to want to know how you’ll be compensated now and in the future. After all, the average job candidate in the United States stays in the job for which they were hired for about four years. After that, it’s time to move up or move on.

But how do you ask about promotions in an interview without making it look like you’re going to move on quickly? Or without coming across like you think you deserve a better job right from the start?

It can be an uncomfortable conversation, but there’s no opting out. In order to choose the opportunity that best fits your career plans, you need to have accurate information about the position. That conversation must involve a glimpse of what promotions and raises might look like if you were to accept a job offer.

Here are three effective questions to help you ask about promotions in an interview without looking presumptuous:

1. ASK, “HOW DO YOU HELP GOOD PERFORMERS GROW IN THIS POSITION?”
Companies attract competitive candidates by offering growth opportunities. It’s very likely that the company you’re interviewing with will want to highlight its efforts to help employees grow and evolve through professional development, education, or experience opportunities.

Continue reading the complete article on Fast Company >>

10 Belief Triggers that Sabotage Your Success

Filed under: Attitude, Best Advice, Career & Money, Success

Some of our inner beliefs can trigger failure before it happens. They sabotage change by cancelling its possibility! Discover how to recognize these sabotaging beliefs and learn what you can do about them.

I’m sure you’ve met him, or her. That person who says he’ll finish the project tomorrow, but tomorrow never comes. Or the person who promises to call as soon as she gets home, but you never hear from her.

We know lots of people like this. If we’re a hard case, we cut them out of our lives. If we’re a “softie”, we make excuses, and try to let it go. Either way, these people, who make promises to change one day and excuses not to the next, exist.

And, we may have even done this ourselves! I know I have. For those of us who admit to it, we know our genius becomes more acute when it’s our turn to change how we behave. That’s when we fall back on a set of beliefs that trigger denial, resistance, and ultimately self-delusion. These beliefs are more wicked than excuses. An excuse is the handy explanation we offer when we disappoint other people. It is acute and convenient, often made up on the spot. Basically an excuse is a variation on “The dog ate my homework,” and these are so abused it’s a wonder anyone believes them.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

Big Or Little: What Kind Of Career Do You Want?

Filed under: Career & Money, Professional Development, Self Reflection, Success

Do you want a big or little career? It’s time to decide.

A big career is bold, exciting and rewarding. It has tumultuous moments, yes, but along with the precarious days and months come many others that exceed your most wildly optimistic dreams.

A little career is safe, undemanding and predictable. You will sleep well at night, knowing that tomorrow will be almost exactly the same as yesterday and 1,000 yesterdays before.

When I ask the question like this – big or little? – many people are tempted to answer: big. In our culture, big is better.

But in reality, most people go to work each day and act as though they prefer: little.

Of course, you may not think of your career aspirations as: little. But when faced with a choice between leading a high visibility charge or playing it safe by putting your head down and doing your job, you may put your head down.

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >>

US Economy Grows Incredible 5%

Filed under: Career & Money, Insights, Your Career

Evidence is mounting that the U.S. economy is kicking into high gear.

Gross domestic product soared 5% on an annual basis in the third quarter, the government said on Tuesday.

To put that in perspective, it’s the strongest quarter of growth since 2003.

“Other than the first quarter’s weather-induced contraction, there’s no doubt the economy has been great this year,” said Dan Greenhaus, chief global strategist at BTIG.

Investors cheered the news, sending the stock market to record highs with the Dow crossing 18,000 for the first time ever.

Click here to read the rest on CNN Money >>

 

2014 Is Best Year For Job Gains Since 1999

Filed under: Career & Money

Hiring surged in November as employers added 321,000 jobs, crowning 2014 as the strongest year for job growth since 1999.

The unemployment rate remained steady at 5.8%, according the government report released Friday. That’s down from 7% this time last year.

Hiring blew out the consensus forecast from economists surveyed by CNNMoney, who expected a gain of 228,000 jobs.

“The number is almost off the charts, given what we’ve seen over the past 10 years,” said Patrick O’Keefe, director of economic research at accounting firm CohnReznick, who does not feel it’s an anomaly. “Companies are making up for hiring that was deferred earlier in the cycle.”

Click here to read the rest on CNN >>

Beyond The Paycheck: What We Wish For

Filed under: Career & Money, Dreams, Expectations, Happiness

Plenty of studies show that pay increases only serve as a short-term performance motivator.

Certainly salary is important; every company should strive to compensate its employees fairly – even, if possible, more than “fairly.” Equitable pay is a given.

But it’s also often true that receiving a raise is a lot like buying a new car. Pretty soon we ratchet our expectations upwards and even a new Ferrari is “just” a car (unless it’s a Tesla, which is never “just a car”).

So where long-term performance is concerned, what matters more than pay? What do people wish for from their work? What helps employees feel truly valued and appreciated – and motivates them to do their absolute best?

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >> 

The Four Qs of Career Success

Filed under: Career & Money, Career Advice, Goals, Success

The National Center for Education Statistics estimates there are 1,791,000 bachelor degree graduates in the class of 2013, many of whom will be entering the job market for the first time. At PwC, we will hire more than 7,000 new associates and interns this year. And this month we will promote 5,400 of our people to the next level. As these professionals launch or accelerate their careers, I’m frequently asked what it takes to be successful.

Once upon a time, I may have said it simply comes down to hard work (sprinkled with a bit of luck and sponsorship). It’s what my parents drilled into me from an early age. While I’ve certainly worked hard over the course of my 28-year career, hard work, it turns out, was just a small part of the equation. I attribute success to the development of these four attributes.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

The Internet and Employee Productivity

Filed under: Career & Money, Distractions, Efficiency, Focus, Productivity, Technology, Your Career

New research from Deloitte and Google found that flexible approaches to technology contributed to staff satisfaction, retention and collaboration; when staff was happy with workplace IT, they were one-third less likely to leave their job than those who were dissatisfied. Woolworths and Air New Zealand have established “bring your own device” policies to allow staff to use their own technology while still ensuring security.

National University of Singapore researchers found in 2011 that “browsing the Internet serves an important restorative function,” more so than texting, emailing or working without breaks.

Click here to read the rest on SocialTimes >>

 

Five Ways to Climb the Corporate Ladder, Pronto!

Filed under: Career & Money, Persistence, Rational Thought, Success

Here is a great article by By Vicki Salemi Posted on Media Jobs Daily!

Want to expedite climbing the ol’ corporate ladder? As in onward and upward as soon as possible!

Good, we knew you did. Well, according to a piece published by Forbes there are several ways to accomplish this and they all involve becoming a rock star in your own right. (And by that we mean setting a good example and being the consummate professional.)

 1. Think and act a level above your own. If you’ve ever heard the expression to “act as if,” now’s the time to put it into effect. How else can you expect to get ahead if you don’t already know what you should think and act like? Dress like?

Click here to read more . . .