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Category: Career Advice

5 Ways to Get Recognized as an Outstanding Employee

Filed under: Career Advice, Insights, Quick Tips, Your Career

If you think about the best employees at your company, what qualities do they have? Sure, being a valuable employee involves being intelligent, reliable, and competent, but it’s about so much more than that.

Many people don’t realize that work success is often a reflection of your character traits. For example, if you’re unselfish, passionate, and enthusiastic, chances are you are the kind of person most people want to work with. Those qualities translate to success regardless of your industry.

“There was a time when success was measured by the title you held at work, the size of your home, or the make of your car,” explains Sheryl Connelly, global consumer trends expert. “But it seems society has been moving away from these traditional markers of success and making way for much more individual expressions of success.”

Here are five ways to be a better employee — and ultimately, to get more recognition:

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

5 Habits You Can Learn From Young Leaders

Filed under: Career Advice, Good Habits, Leadership, Millennials

What does it take to be a young leader? Or to lead people of all ages and truly inspire them?

Many believe years of experience, expert knowledge and firmly developed connections make a leader great. Yet, does time on this earth alone make a leader noteworthy? The military is arguably the best organization at developing young leaders. History tells of young trailblazers like Joan of Arc, who led the French Army at only seventeen; of conquerors like Alexander the Great who controlled the known world before he turned 30. These young leaders thrived without a lifetime of developed knowledge, and instead created experiences as they went.

The modern business world has seen an influx of CEO’s under the age of thirty. Sure, they aren’t conquering nations or leading armies by the thousands, but they have the same qualities of these great leaders from the past. Time has proven that the valor of a leader is not defined by their age, but instead by their raw ability to inspire others to follow them towards the execution of a specific vision.

Young leaders must be able to motivate young and old alike, in addition to bridging the age gaps in between. They are not limited by the number of years they have been alive or what others think of them, so what is it that makes them successful?

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >> 

Don’t Bring Your Boss Only One Solution To A Problem

Filed under: Best Advice, Career Advice, Good Habits, Quick Tips

Imagine you discover a significant problem at work; the kind you need approval from your boss to solve. So you work up a proposal, bring it to your boss, and wait for approval. You’re a problem solver, and that’s what problem solvers do, right? You find a problem and generate a solution.

But imagine that instead of giving your proposal the green light, the boss says “that’s a good try, but I’d like to go in a different direction.”

Now what? Many employees will be pretty irritated. (I’ve seen more than a few employees pout, backstab, become passive-aggressive, and even sabotage the boss’ solution). After all, you just created a smart proposal, with a good solution, and the only thing the boss had to do was say “yes” and let you do your job. On paper, this should have been a slam-dunk.

So what went wrong? First, we’ve got to recognize the natural desire to feel useful (something which bosses do share). Many bosses, like people in general, don’t want to be a rubber stamp; they want to put their own unique stamp onto a solution so that later they can reflect on this masterpiece and exclaim “yeah, I did that!”

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >>

No More Worry and Stress: Five Effective Strategies

Filed under: Career Advice, Strategy, Stress, worry

In my last month’s blog, I spoke about happiness and challenged you to take the “happiness challenge.” One of the biggest obstacles to happiness is stress and worry. We all have some stress and worry in our lives. Some stress and worry can be helpful in our daily functioning.  However, when stress and worry overtakes us, we begin to spin and move to the dark side. In my practice and at my school, I often work with adults and children who are adversely affected by stress. In this month’s blog, I would like to share with you the top five strategies that have helped my patients combat stress and worry.

1. Give Worry/Anxiety a Name

It is essential to first recognize and name what one is experiencing. Many times when I work with children and adults they are being “tricked” by worry, allowing worry to dictate their lives. Step one, is to recognize when it is the “WORRY” talking to you. Once you recognize that it is worry trying to trick you, you are better able to accomplish Step two, which is “DON’T LISTEN TO IT!” As one of the kids I worked with said, “When I hear the worry bug trying to trick me, I try to flush him down the toilet.” If you look at a common thread that is shared in evidenced-based treatment for anxiety, they all give worry a name. By giving worry a name, the worry is externalized and separated from the person, making it easier to address.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

20 Things Your Boss Will Love To Hear and Why

Filed under: Best Advice, Career Advice, Good Habits, Quick Tips, Rational Thought

Looking to make a good impression with a new boss or improve your relationship with your current manager? Try adding a few of these powerful phrases into your conversations. You can easily improve your standing with your boss without being insincere or being thought a brown-noser.

  1. How can I help?
    This is probably the number one thing managers like to hear. (The opposite would be, “That’s not my job.”) It shows you’re a team player and willing to pitch in, even outside your specific job duties.
  2. Not a problem.
    When your manager asks you to do something, be positive about it. Make her feel confident that you’ll address the task without her having to micromanage
  3. I’d like to learn more.
    Indicating to your boss that you’re interested in things outside your area of expertise is a great way to show that you’re serious about moving up in the company or your career. It shows ambition and even an understanding of your own shortcomings, which is appealing when you’re willing to address them.

 

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

Why Culture Matters More Than Goals

Filed under: Career Advice, company culture, Goals, Insights

What’s the culture of your organization? Is it an environment where things get done on time, every time? Or are deadlines more flexible? Do you believe in having fun, or is it more serious?

Every organization has a culture, so does every family. Culture is the, usually, unspoken beliefs about how things work around here.

Peter Drucker famously said, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”

Culture is often what enables or prevents an organization from achieving goals.

For example, if an organization sets a goal to increase on time deliveries, but the culture tolerates excuses, it’s unlikely that the team will achieve the goal. The company can provide incentives, and it may drive a short-term spike, but in the end, the culture will ultimately prevail.

Why does this happen?

It’s a case of implicit versus explicit. Most leaders are explicit about goals, they write them down, share them, and measure against them. But when it comes to culture, it’s more implicit. We assume people should just “know” how to behave.

Click here to read the rest on Huffington Post >>

How Your Facial Expressions at Work Can Hurt Your Career

Filed under: Best Advice, Career Advice, Personality, Quick Tips

What’s the first thing you notice about a person? It’s generally their facial expression. And when you meet someone for the first time, you’re likely to remember if they greeted you with a big grin or a disappointing sulk. First impressions do matter, and your facial expressions can affect how people perceive you. Dr. Alan Fridlund, professor at University of California Santa Barbara, says that expressions are inherently social; they give others clues to how you’re feeling.

Facial expressions can forecast how a person’s feeling: “The face is like a switch on a railroad track,” Fridlund says. “It affects the trajectory of the social interaction the way the switch would affect the path of the train.” Studies by Dr. Fridlund and others show that expressions “occur most often during pivotal points in social interactions; during greetings, social crises, or times of appeasement.” This is where your career may be affected. Because a facial expression can give insight into how a person feels, it may be influencing how you’re perceived at work. Here are three situations where showing your gut reaction through your facial expression may affect you in the workplace.

1. Greeting Someone in the Office Who You Don’t Like

Our general reaction to someone we don’t like is shown directly through the expression our face makes. Dr. Fridlund says that “a scowl may impel them to stay clear.”

Click here to read the rest on Business Insider >>

Think Grammar Doesn’t Matter? It Could Be Holding You Back From a Promotion

Filed under: Career Advice, Cognitive Ability, Feedback, Insights, Uncategorized

Many people think that once they leave school, they don’t need to worry about grammar. In the real world, most people will just figure out what you mean … right?

Not quite. Turns out, quality writing can help you get ahead in your career — and poor writing can hold you back. So if you want to get ahead in the workplace, change careers, or find a job, then it’s time to dust off that dictionary, thumb through your thesaurus, and get a grip on grammar.

At Grammarly, we found some data to back this up. We studied 100 LinkedIn profiles of native English-speakers in the consumer packaged goods industry, and each of the professionals we looked at worked for no more than three employers over the first 10 years of their career. Half were promoted to director-level or above within those 10 years, and the other half were not.

We discovered a correlation between the number of grammar and spelling errors in a profile and the trajectory of that person’s career. Here are some of our study’s main takeaways:

Click here to read the rest on HubSpot Blogs >>

5 Ways to Lead in Challenging Times

Filed under: Career Advice, inspiration, Leadership, Your Career

What do leaders do when their stock price has dropped 75 percent and it’s their job to get it back up? What should leaders think when the thrilling vision they had for the future has been clouded by economic uncertainty? How do leaders get inspired when their employees are dejected, worried, and distracted–and let’s face it, on some level so are they?

Wait–don’t answer that. You can’t.

Because no matter how much you know about leadership, regardless of what the research says or what best practice implies, there’s only one way to find the right answers to these questions. Leaders need to find them for themselves.

In a time of unprecedented challenge, leaders don’t just need to lead their companies. They also need to lead themselves. They need strategies for improving their effectiveness while sustaining a sense of professional well-being. Every one of us has an internal source of strength and stability. Without care and consideration these renewable resources are seriously at risk.

In order to survive and thrive, leaders can’t just go about business as usual. Business isn’t “usual” anymore. It’s undergoing a seismic shift. Leaders need to get their footing in a shaky reality and learn to embrace the possibilities ahead.

Click here to read the rest on INC >>

Modern Etiquette: Proper Protocol When Leaving a Job

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Good Habits, Quick Tips

(Reuters) – According to a fall 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Labor, more American workers are on the move than ever before.

The report states that 2.8 million people quit their jobs last September — the highest number since April of 2008. In addition, another 1.6 million workers left their jobs due to layoffs and terminations. That means nearly 4.5 million workers were faced with a very important question — what is the best way to leave a job?

Whether you’re terminated, downsized or leave on your own accord, there are many ways to ensure a graceful exit and to employ proper protocol when leaving your present position.

Regardless of the circumstances, these measures will not only keep your reputation intact but they can also help you chart a polished and professional exit strategy.

Be honest about why you are leaving. If you need a change, a more positive work environment, an increase in salary or you simply need a new career challenge, be honest about why you are leaving. If your company gives exit interviews, you can also offer feedback on ways to enhance working conditions.

Click here to read the rest on Reuters >>