Blog

Category: Career Advice

5 Phrases That Can Ruin Your Reputation with Your Boss

Filed under: Career Advice, Communication, Strategy, Success

If you want to get ahead at work, there are certain things you should steer clear of saying in the office. Even if what you’re saying is true (and everyone knows it!). Every time you want to lash out at an irritating manager or co-worker, take a breath and watch your words. Finding productive ways to work through your frustrations will put you that much closer to landing that promotion. Sometimes it’s as easy as walking away from the situation and taking a deep breath, other times it’s as hard as confronting the person professionally. (And sometimes it’s as fun as taking a coloring break.)

However, the answer is never to let your boss overhear you say these five things in your moments of frustration:

1. “That’s Not my Job”
Here’s the thing about your company—it’s (hopefully) always growing, expanding, and revising its goals as needed. And that means that you’re going to be asked to take on assignments that fall outside of your exact job description. Especially if you’re competent and able to handle everything that’s currently on your plate.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

Don’t Get Fired for Honest Mistakes

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication, Decision Making

There are so many things that can get good, hard-working people fired. Honest mistakes often carry hard-hitting consequences.

What happened last Saturday is a perfect example. With the Texas Longhorns football team having lost their fourth game of the season, and the Texas Rangers baseball team under the bright playoff spotlight, someone from the Rangers’ social media team tweeted “Fire Charlie” (in reference to the Longhorns’ head coach) on the Rangers’ official Twitter account.

Naturally, the Rangers employee who typed the offending tweet meant to send it from his or her personal account. Still, it’s a slip of the thumbs that put this person out of a job.

The Rangers aren’t the only organization to fire people for technological slip-ups. A recent study from the ePolicy Institute surveyed more than 300 companies and found that a third of them have fired employees for the misuse of company technology.

Companies are so worried about employee abuse of technology that 45% of those surveyed admitted that they track employee technology use (some all the way down to the keystroke), yet only two US states require employers to notify employees when they’re monitoring them.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

3 Power Plays Millennials Can Use to Avoid an Epic Career Fail

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Goals, Millennials, Professional Development

This is an email I got from a Millennial client this week:

Dear J.T.,

I recently graduated from college. I did an internship my senior year tied to my major and realized I don’t want to be in the field. It’s been four months, and I’m still trying to find a new career path and first job. I’m having a lot of trouble and am stressed. My biggest fear is I’ll be overqualified for the work and be unhappy.

My response was:

The last thing you should worry about is being overqualified. In fact, your goal should be to find a job where you are ridiculously overqualified.

Qualifications Without Third-Party Validation Aren’t of Value

Millennials are the most educated generation to ever enter the work force. However, a college degree doesn’t provide proof of skill. Learning how to do something and doing it skillfully are two very different things. Employers know that. It’s why they put you in entry-level jobs where you feel overqualified. They want to see you exceed expectations so you can earn their trust and respect. This is how you fast-track your career and move on to work that leverages your strengths and lets you continue to grow.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >> 

11 Ways to Get What You Want Out of Your Review

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Communication, Confidence, Professional Development

Second only to the interview that landed you the job, performance reviews with your boss can be rife with trepidation. You’re going to be evaluated, asked to give your own critique, and more than likely, this is your shot to discuss a raise and/or promotion. Yikes. But as daunting as these topics can be, once you get over the initial nerves and dread, you can see it for what it really is: an opportunity to distinguish yourself.

To help quell anxieties and learn tricks of the performance review trade, we looked to three of our go-to career experts to outline how to prepare and tap into our inner #GirlBoss. No sweaty palms, here…

1. Over-prepare. Too many people miss important opportunities by not putting their heart into preparing for a review. Spend some time being thoughtful about the last year—and the next one. Write out answers to the following questions in advance:

Click here to read the rest on Marie Claire >>

Build A Network: 5 Tips For Small Talk With Senior Colleagues

Filed under: Branding, Career Advice, Communication, Confidence, Networking, Relationships

Connecting with colleagues at work is among the best things you can do to improve your effectiveness in the workplace. And while it’s easy to lean over to Amy in the next cubicle and ask her how her weekend went, when it comes to a more senior colleague in the corner office, the idea of starting a conversation can be intimidating. So what should you say when you hop on an elevator and find yourself one on one with the managing director?

Ask About Them

Generally speaking, people feel comfortable, and enjoy, talking about themselves. While it might be intimidating to start the conversation, the easiest way to get it going is to ask a question to which you know that senior colleague has an answer. Questions about their commute, hobbies and television shows you know they enjoy, or a recent vacation are all lighthearted, easy, and enjoyable. Who doesn’t like talking about the trout they bagged over the weekend, or the latest storyline on Scandal? The point of these conversations is to build some common ground so the next time you find yourself in the elevator you can see if they enjoyed the Mad Men finale as much as you did.

Click here to read the rest on Edge Work >>

4 Ways to Figure Out What You’re Good At (Not Just What You’re Passionate About)

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Confidence, Professional Development, Psychology, Self Reflection

It’s a universal dream to do what we’re passionate about. The only problem with this aspiration is that sometimes the thing we most care about isn’t what we do best. As Gloria Steinem famously said, “We teach what we need to learn, and write what we need to know.”

Don’t worry! This doesn’t mean your dream is dead. It just means that you need to figure out how to bring that dream to fruition—using the skills you currently possess. Sure, your dream will be tweaked and altered. But, at the end of the day, you’ll still be able to do what you’re passionate about.

Here are four questions you should ask yourself to help make that happen:

1. What Skills Have Helped You Thrive?

During your childhood and college years, you’ve no doubt developed certain skills out of necessity.

Click here to read the rest on The Muse >>

Overqualified for Your Job? Here’s How You Can Start Making the Most of It

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, motivation, Professional Development

You waltz off your college graduation stage, diploma in hand, just knowing that you’re destined for greatness in your career. So, imagine your surprise when a few months later you find yourself as a receptionist with a completely unused bachelor’s degree. And you end up behind that desk for longer than you ever imagined. Yes, this is a true story. Well, ahem, it’s actually my story.

Fortunately (or maybe unfortunately), I knew I wasn’t alone in those circumstances. Getting the job of your dreams (or even in your field) can be tough. And, you might just wind up working in a position that doesn’t make great use of the degree you worked so hard for.

Trust me, I know this is frustrating and even a little demoralizing. But, it’s not the end of the world. In fact, there are a few things you can do to make the most of your seemingly futile and unrelated job.

Give these tactics a try to squeeze all that you can out of your current position. Or, just keep complaining. The choice is yours.

Click here to read the rest on The Muse >>

How to Blow Your Boss’ Mind

Filed under: Career Advice, Good Habits, Professional Development, Strategy

We all want to get ahead. Still, even when it seems you’re doing everything right—you’re never late to work, rarely take a sick day, and always meet deadlines—promotions can be few and far between.

You’re putting the work in, so why aren’t you getting rewarded? The answer is simple: you don’t get promoted for fulfilling your boss’s expectations.

Your boss’s expectations are the price of entry. Even if you’re making a great effort and doing all that’s asked of you, you won’t stand out. You’ll be seen as someone who completes the minimum requirements, and no one who builds a great career is seen this way.

The trick to advancing your career and getting paid more is to add value by making certain your contributions are worth more than you’re paid. You want to go above and beyond so that you’re seen as someone highly valuable—someone the organization can’t live without.

You should aim to exceed your boss’s expectations so much that he feels like he’s the smartest guy in the world for hiring you.

This isn’t as hard as it sounds. In fact, you can blow your boss’s mind in seven easy steps.

Click here to read the rest on Entrepreneur >>

30 CEOs Reveal the Daily Habits Responsible for Their Success

Filed under: Attitude, Career Advice, Good Habits, inspiration, Success

Look at any CEO running a profitable company and you’ll find someone who has figured a few things out. One trait many of these leaders have in common: consistency. Check out these quotes from 30 successful CEOs regarding the daily habits that help them get ahead in business and life.

1. Try one new thing each day.
“Every day, I force myself to do something that is out of my comfort zone. If I hadn’t left my comfort zone back in 2008 to buy that one-way ticket to Buenos Aires, I never would have met my business partner, Aaron Firestein, and BucketFeet would never exist.”

–Raaja Nemani, co-founder and CEO of BucketFeet, a footwear brand that was founded in 2011 after a chance meeting between two travelers. It has grown from one hand-decorated pair of shoes to a brand that has collaborated with over 20,000 artists in more than 100 countries.

2. Don’t do bad days.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

6 Common Myths Holding You Back at Work

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Professional Development, Quick Tips, Success

Have you fallen prey to “the way we’ve always done it” at work? Did you know, though, that some of the most common business beliefs are being shattered by new research on how our minds and emotions function?

When you put these myths into practice, you contradict your basic primal nature by denying your emotional needs and disregarding the fundamental wiring of your brain.

So, what should you stop believing? Here are six squashable status quos:

Myth #1: Always stay calm and cool.

Business moves at the speed of light, and problems have become the rule rather than the exception. You will feel stress. When you try to hide your feelings, you don’t fool anyone but yourself. Your subtle facial expressions, body language and other physiological signals will reveal your innermost feelings, whether you want to or not. When people don’t see those completely normal, physiological signals in you, they lose a bit of trust in your authenticity. Worse, you rob yourself of the vital energy you need to solve the very problem that has been causing the stress.

Instead, wear your stress on your sleeve.

Click here to read the rest on Success >>