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Category: Career Advice

Wagner College Q&A with Gregg Gavioli

Filed under: Career Advice, Hiring, Job Search, Professional Development

Wagner College invited Gregg Gavioli, Managing Director of the Accounting & Finance division at Solomon Page, to speak to their top 5% of business students, known as “Selects,” at a round table event. The discussion covered the job market, networking, and the finance industry and provided upcoming graduates with an intimate opportunity to ask questions and learn about working as a professional in the accounting and financial industries.

Below is a Q&A excerpt from this meeting.

1. What types of jobs within the industry are threatened the most by the rise of financial technology?

Operations roles. Clearing, customer service, trade execution. Anything that can be automated, off shored, or moved to a lower cost center. If you are open to relocation, many major banks have large service centers in places like Salt Lake, Baltimore, Tampa, Jacksonville, Dallas, and Tennessee. If you are flexible, there can be opportunity there for you.

 

2. Is our generation really worse off than our parents in terms of earning potential?

I don’t think so. Wages are rising. The main point of difference may be if you are carrying student debt. My advice is live frugally for your first 5 years. Don’t eat out often. Make coffee at home. Live with many roommates or parents where possible. Start a 401k as soon as you can.

 

3. The finance industry is overwhelming. I have 2 months until graduation and still have no idea what I want to do. What is my best strategy from this point forward?

You may not know what you want to do any time soon. That’s OK. Field as many interviews and get as many job offers as you can. Take the one that has the most opportunity to learn many things closely aligned with your interest. Learn what you like and what you don’t like in that first job and use it to find your next. You will likely need to do this a few times before you know what “your field” is.  Find something your passionate about, and it will not feel like a job. You don’t want to be watching the clock waiting for the end of the day to run out the door. If it feels that way all the time, change fields.

 

4. What is the single most important quality that you are looking for in an applicant? Particularly a Wagner student going up against the Ivy League?

Ability to communicate effectively. Make eye contact. Is there a fire in your belly? Do I want you on my team? Do you know excel at a high level?

 

5. What do you believe is the best way to write a cover letter to get yourself noticed and receive a response? What should be included? Length?

One page, always customize it, mention why you are the perfect candidate for the role.

 

6. What entry level positions should we be looking for to put ourselves in the best position for a greater opportunity down the road?

Any one that puts you in a positon to learn. Be open to figuring things out on your own. Ask for more work when you need it. Compliance and analytics roles offer long term opportunity as well as anything that can make you a subject matter expert where you can transition to a Project manager or a Business Analyst at some point.

 

7. What areas of the finance industry are up and coming and what areas of the industry do you see dying out within the next 10 years?

Compliance. Big Data, Projects Management, Business Analytics, Analytics, Ad-tech. Analytics related to Advertising, Social Media, and Search engines is an exciting field to explore for finance majors.

 

8. What career paths would you recommend for a finance major, aside from the traditional banking route?

Compliance, analytics, quant, advertising data analysis, FPA, Budget.

 

9. How did you go about expanding your network

Use LinkedIn. Did you create a profile? Have you joined the Wagner Alumni group I created on LinkedIn?  Send a customized email to any Wagner Alumni who may be working at your target company who may be open to meeting you for coffee for advice or helping you with applications. Professional and social groups. HS Groups. Skills Group like compliance, advertising, accounting clubs (IMA, AICPA) etc.

 

10. Did you get a master’s Degree and if so when did you get it.

No. If you are not getting it right away, see if you can get tuition reimbursement from a big employer. It’s most important when advancing up the ladder into management roles and has the biggest payoff there.

 

11. What are your recommendations on preparing for a meeting with a mentor?

Research the mentor. Come prepared with questions based on their background. Use their time wisely.

 

12. What is the most effective way of preparing for an interview?

Research the Company, research interviewer’s profiles, have multiple different questions prepared for different people. Up to 10 questions is not too many. Never say I have no questions at all.

 

13. How can I ensure follow up after an application?

You can’t really but send a customized thank you note, if no response one more check in email is OK and that is the max. Have a thank you note ready to go after the interview in a stamped envelope and drop in the post office box near the company.

For upcoming graduates, our expert recruiters are equipped with the advice and contacts to help jumpstart your professional career. Get in touch today and learn more about our service offerings.

The Positive Trait That Holds Talented People Back at Work

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication, Confidence

In a perfect world, your completed assignments would speak for themselves. You’d work on friendly, collaborative teams with fair-minded co-workers, and each person would be free with praise and full of self-effacing humility. You’d never have to worry about self-promotion or navigating office politics to get your due.

But the reality is that you need to speak up. Generosity and a humble nature are great attributes to have, of course. They help you keep a team-first attitude, improve your leadership abilities, and generally endear people to you as a professional.

However, if you think you can just let your work speak for itself and never stake out that territory yourself, then being “the humble one” is hurting your career.

Here’s how:

1. It Makes You Invisible

Imagine this: Your team just completed a complex, innovative project, and you feel proud of your contributions to the group effort. But when the boss stands up at the company meeting to praise your team’s work, others are singled out for individual contributions while you seem invisible.

Click here to read the rest on The Muse >>

4 Signs It’s Time To Change Your Job (And 2 Signs It’s Not)

Filed under: Career Advice, Decision Making

The working world isn’t the same as it used to be. With millennials changing jobs four times in their first decade out of college, according to a recent study by LinkedIn, we’re a long way away from the time where people stayed at the same company from first day to last.

While many bemoan the frivolous nature of the millennial generation for this constant chopping and changing, it’s not the CV faux pas that it once was. The availability of information and constantly changing job market have both contributed to increased acceptability. But how do you know when it’s time to make a move?

We all know an ideal job needs to be exciting and engaging, with the right culture to make you jump out of bed in the morning bright eyed and ready to start your day. But if you’re less sure about the pros and cons of your current job, how do you know if it’s time to see if the grass really is greener?

Click here to read the rest on Come Recommended >> 

 

WHY ARE WE ALL SO AFRAID TO TALK ABOUT OUR MISTAKES?

Filed under: Career Advice, Insights, Women Leaders

WHEN I WAS 14, I MARCHED INTO THE HOUSE WITH MY REPORT CARD, TOSSED IT IN FRONT OF MY DAD, AND WAITED FOR HIM TO GASP AT THE PERFECT GRADE COLUMN: A, A, A, A, A, A, A.
But after a silent speed read, my dad glanced up and said:
“Hey! Kit, this is great! But maybe next semester, let yourself get a C in something.”
I’ve always been a perfectionist. Like a Type A, anxiety-prone, neurotic mess when things don’t go my way, nut job perfectionist. If you’re reading this site, chances are you’re something of one, too. Maybe the thought of screwing up at work can keep you from sleeping at night or a performance review with any semblance of constructive criticism makes your stomach churn. Or maybe the idea of an off-center Instagram post can ruin your week.
Mistakes, right? Nothing like making one to ruin a perfectly good day. So we do our best to never let them happen.

Click here to read the rest on Career Contessa >>

5 Things No One Will Tell You At Your First Job

Filed under: Career Advice, Your Career

It’s your first job. It’s hard not to be excited. There is so much to learn and a lot of it will be told to you directly but there will be so many important lessons you won’t even realize your absorbing until later. But here is a jumpstart on some of the things no one is telling you at your first job.
Your life’s greater purpose.
Sure, many of us are lucky to land a role that points us down the perfect path. But your greater life’s purpose probably isn’t directly tied to the workplace — it’s a lot more complex than that. It’ll take time for you to grow as an individual before you decide what you value most in the world, and this first role might not give that to you.
Anything you don’t ask about.
Remember, this job is your responsibility. If you don’t ask questions, you’re not going to get answers. Soak up everything you see around you, but don’t forget to put the queries out there. It’s time to take charge of your role, and asking the right questions is the best way to begin.

Click here to read the rest on LEVO >>

Your Community Holds the Key to Career Success

Filed under: Career Advice, Networking, Women Leaders

You’ve landed your dream job. You volunteer for assignments, sign up for committees, join colleagues for happy hour. You’ve got that networking thing nailed. Right?

Wrong!

Yes, it’s important to build a network within your organization, getting to know – and be known by – people across departments, disciplines, levels. But it’s just as important to get involved outside your organization.

You might question if you have time for more, but to me, it’s a no-brainer. In my experience, getting involved in the community is an investment in you that will pay long-term dividends.

Here’s why giving back to the community has also been great for my career:

Click here to read the rest on Motto >>

Career Tip For Millennials: Be Clear, Concise And Compelling

Filed under: Best Advice, Career Advice, Millennials

It is hard to be clear. It is hard to be concise. It is hard to be compelling. It is really hard to be all three at the same time! For that important presentation, however, mastering the art of being all three is essential to creating passionate support from your audience. It is the difference between “that sounds good; let’s review it and get back together” and “Wow, we need to do this now!

Be Clear. It is human nature to be vague, even when we try to be clear. Language is imprecise and often the words we use cannot completely describe the thought. And then there is our unspoken body language, which often confuses or distracts from our words. To further complicate matters, we often start with only a “rough idea” of what we want to say. Being clear starts with taking the time to fully think through exactly what we are proposing and why.

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >> 

27 Highly Successful People Share the Best Career Advice for New Grads

Filed under: Best Advice, Career Advice, Millennials, Success

If clichés like “Follow your passion,” “Give 110%,” and “Be true to yourself” just aren’t cutting it for you, then we’ve got some fresh takes on how to get a head start on your career.

From “Don’t work too hard” to “Relax,” here’s some of the best — and often unconventional — advice for you from some really successful people:

Richard Branson: Never look back in regret — move on to the next thing

Richard Branson’s mother taught him that.

“The amount of time people waste dwelling on failures, rather than putting that energy into another project, always amazes me,” the Virgin Group founder and chairman told The Good Entrepreneur. “I have fun running ALL the Virgin businesses — so a setback is never a bad experience, just a learning curve.”

Click here to read the rest on Business Insider >>

How to Convincingly Fake Confidence, Happiness and Other Necessary Feelings in the Workplace

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication, How To, Strategy

We fake it in meetings. We fake it over email. We fake it when we’re envious of someone else’s success. We fake it in the elevator when we ask Kyle if he has any weekend plans. The professional world’s a stage, and we’re all actors pretending to care about how Kyle spends his free time.

The question is: How much do the roles in which you cast yourself differ from who you actually are? Because if they differ a lot, you’re going to cause more problems for yourself than if you’d just behave authentically. But if they differ just a little — if you can fake it in a way that tempers your real feelings and allows you to present yourself as calm or deliberate or enthusiastic or charged up or any other situationally virtuous behavior (SVB, as no one but me refers to it) — then you are giving yourself time to let the negative feelings pass. And they will pass.

A few words on self-presentation
You think that’s you going to work? Heading into a meeting with a client? That’s not you. That’s you, plus your self-presentation tactics.

Click here to read the rest on Entrepreneur >>

Why do Employers Expect More of Entry-Level Employees than Ever Before?

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication, Hiring, Societal Shifts

When Grinnell College senior Ham Serunjogi began his first internship at an environmental technology accelerator in 2013, he was shocked by how much was expected of him in his first days on the job, and how little school had prepared him for entering the workforce.

“In my first meeting with the executive director, he was asking me about what classes I had taken, and he asked if I had taken a database class in college, and I did, and he said, ‘Okay, good, then you can oversee this project of designing and implementing a new communication database for us,” he says. “That was the first time I was ever brought into a project I had little or no knowledge about, and was expected to deliver results.”

Serunjogi soon realized that there was an expectation for him to learn on the fly, and to make a meaningful contribution early on in his internship. And this past summer, Serunjogi began an internship at Facebook, where expectations were even higher.

“Facebook is a very fast moving culture,” he says. “There’s an expectation that you come in and you learn how to catch up with everyone else, otherwise you slow down the entire organization.”

According to a recent study by Harris Poll, commissioned by education-technology company Fullbridge, 27% of the 319 executives surveyed said they form an opinion of entry-level employees in less than two weeks, and 78% decide in less than three months whether or not that employee will be successful.

Click here to read the rest on Fast Company >>