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Category: Branding

WWD EXCLUSIVE: Solomon Page Acquires E.A. Hughes & Co.

Filed under: ambition, Big Ideas & Innovation, Branding, Communication, company culture, Company News, Job Market, Leadership, News, Organization, Solomon Page, Uncategorized, Women Leaders

The deal bolsters Solomon Page’s position in retail and fashion c-suite searches.

As seen in WWD.

By David Moin on January 28, 2019

Solomon Page, a $185 million staffing and executive search firm servicing 14 different sectors, has acquired E.A. Hughes & Co., a retained executive search firm.

“Our primary driver of growth historically has been organic,” said Lloyd Solomon, a founding partner and managing director of Solomon Page. “We attract experienced people, add to the team and build our service offerings. But selectively, when we see something we consider unique and special and circumstances coincide, we will do an acquisition and incorporate their team into ours to create a bigger family and better services for clients.

“We’ve done about four acquisitions over our 28-year history, in health-care executive search, the publishing search space, in the legal staffing world and technology,” Solomon said. “E.A. Hughes really extends our reach in the fashion retail consumer goods space and becomes a division. They retain their group, and operate autonomously and collaboratively with our existing fashion team.”

Solomon added that E.A. Hughes’ expertise in c-suite searches complements Solomon Page’s strength in full-time recruitment and freelance hiring, thereby providing Solomon Page with a “broader” approach.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The E.A. Hughes team of eight will continue to be led by Elaine Hughes, who founded E.A. Hughes & Co. in 1991. The boutique executive search firm has been serving the retail, apparel, footwear, beauty, home and e-commerce sectors, among others.

She reports to Solomon, and joins Solomon Page’s fashion and beauty division, led by managing directors Sue Lamoreaux and Patty Hoban Scott.

“Elaine has influenced the careers of many senior executives in retail and fashion and advocated for women in the industry by example and involvement in many organizations during the past three decades,” Lamoreaux said.

Hughes underscored the “synergies” accomplished by combining the two firms, and that the deal gives Solomon Page a broader scope of talent acquisition encompassing Csuite executive search, mid-level searches, as well as staff jobs such as sales associates.

As Hughes sees it, inadequate search is a big factor behind the industry’s high rate turnover at the c-suite level. Many search firms, she suggested, neglect conducting the proper “deep dive” into the candidate’s functional talents, experience and E.Q. to determine whether he or she is a good fit for the organization doing the recruiting and its culture. “No one really assesses it all,” Hughes said.

Recently, Lisa Berger, formerly with the 24 Seven recruitment agency, joined Solomon Page to launch its beauty segment.

“In the ever-evolving landscape of human capital and business models, our goal is to adapt to shifts in the marketplace and create a multifaceted approach to our clients,” Solomon said.

The New York-based Solomon Page, founded in 1990, has 275 employees, 10 offices in the U.S., and one in London. Scott Page is also a founding partner in the company and managing director.

7 Tips to Rebrand Yourself for an Industry Switch

Filed under: Branding, Career Advice, Confidence, Goals, Job Market, Job Search, Professional Development, Your Career

Ready for a career change, but worried you don’t have the experience or skills to land a job in your desired field? Filling your resume with your previous work experience that has no similarity to the job you’re applying for is likely to land your resume in the trash can. But that doesn’t mean you’re stuck in a career you hate forever.

Dawn Graham, PhD, career coach, psychologist, and author of the book Switchers: How Smart Professionals Change Career–and Seize Success, says rebranding your professional experience is key to a successful career switch. “When you’re making a switch, you need to be a good fit for the role, and while some of your skills and experiences may be transferrable, many may not be,” she says. Here’s how you can prove that you’re worthy of the title, even when your resume shows no previous experience in the field.

1. Change your social presence

Use social media to your advantage to rebrand yourself in your new career area. Follow thought leaders in your target industry and comment on their posts. Connect with relevant industry groups and associations, share relevant and interesting articles within your online network, comment on posts, attend the biggest industry conferences, and develop a network of contacts in the industry. “Technology makes it easier than ever to market yourself in a way that appeals to the audience you choose,” says Graham. The more you can demonstrate that you’re serious and invested in your new target industry, the more credible you will seem.

2. Find your transferrable skills

Rebranding yourself takes time and introspection. Everyone has transferrable skills, even if you think you don’t. Graham gives the example of a recruiter who wants to move into social media marketing. “You can show off your customer research, analytics, and technical savvy skills,” she says. Demonstrating how you can reach new customers using the same skill set you used to uncover qualified candidates is a way to prove that your experience is relevant.

To determine your skills, Graham recommends breaking down achievements. “If you contributed to saving a large client, consider the steps that got you to that result–perhaps problem solving, diplomacy, creativity, and influencing.” Do the same with other accomplishments and you’ll soon notice a pattern of core strengths. Try going through this exercise with a colleague or manager who may be able to see strengths that you are overlooking.

3. Do your research

In order to find out what skills and experiences are most relevant to your new career choice, spend time learning as much as you can about your target position. Speak with professionals in your target industry, look for volunteer positions in the industry, take courses, and attend professional events to learn what experiences and skill sets are most valuable in the new industry.

4. Don’t lead with your title

While most of us use our job title when introducing ourselves, this can be an error when you’re switching careers. Many companies use language that doesn’t translate outside the industry. A title can cause confusion for someone in another industry, and biases their opinion toward your application. They may think right away that you’re not a good fit without reading further into your experiences. Instead of focusing on your title, place the emphasis on your value–the skills you developed in that position.

5. Know your audience

In order to highlight your value and position yourself as a good fit for the job, you need to know the challenges the hiring manager is trying to solve. “Many job seekers have incredible accomplishments, but without knowing what is important to your audience, you risk leading off with accomplishments that, while impressive, lead the hirer to think you’re not a fit for the role,” says Graham.

When in a job interview, make one of your first questions about the challenges the company or department is facing at this time. Once you find out the hiring company’s pain points, you can select the achievements from your background that best align with what the hiring manager is looking for in the role.

6. Cherry-pick experiences

Some of your best accomplishments and achievements may not be impressive to the hiring manager if they have no relation to the job you’re applying for. To be most effective in rebranding yourself professionally, select the parts of your experience that align most closely with your target role. To make your application in this new field stronger, highlight these experiences in your LinkedIn profile.

If hiring managers are reviewing your resume and then jump over to LinkedIn and see a whole different type of experience highlighted, they may be confused and cause them to put aside your resume. Rebranding your professional experience may mean dropping what you think are some of your best accomplishments, but by focusing on “fit” first, you will have a better chance of a recruiter recognizing you as a potential candidate for the position.

7. Justify the switch

“Every hiring manager wants to know why this job at this company at this time,” says Graham. Your answer to this question will be especially important if you’re a career switcher.

Build A Network: 5 Tips For Small Talk With Senior Colleagues

Filed under: Branding, Career Advice, Communication, Confidence, Networking, Relationships

Connecting with colleagues at work is among the best things you can do to improve your effectiveness in the workplace. And while it’s easy to lean over to Amy in the next cubicle and ask her how her weekend went, when it comes to a more senior colleague in the corner office, the idea of starting a conversation can be intimidating. So what should you say when you hop on an elevator and find yourself one on one with the managing director?

Ask About Them

Generally speaking, people feel comfortable, and enjoy, talking about themselves. While it might be intimidating to start the conversation, the easiest way to get it going is to ask a question to which you know that senior colleague has an answer. Questions about their commute, hobbies and television shows you know they enjoy, or a recent vacation are all lighthearted, easy, and enjoyable. Who doesn’t like talking about the trout they bagged over the weekend, or the latest storyline on Scandal? The point of these conversations is to build some common ground so the next time you find yourself in the elevator you can see if they enjoyed the Mad Men finale as much as you did.

Click here to read the rest on Edge Work >>

Boosting Your Credibility in the Workplace

Filed under: Best Advice, Branding, Career Advice, Goals

If you want to be successful in your workplace, you need to have a balance between credibility and competence. Getting ahead essentially means being able to show that not only are you capable of doing your job, you also have the skills to level up.

Check out these tips that are sure to give your credibility a boost:

1. Tell the Truth. Always.

“Oh what a tangled web we weave when we practice to deceive.” – Sir Walter Scott

Credibility and trust always go together. That’s because you get to establish trust by being honest and reliable. If you lie, it’s a sure thing that sooner or later, someone will find out about your deceit. Regardless if whether the lie you made was minor or major, people will already doubt you and will wonder what other things you’ve lied about.

Keep in mind that it’s impossible to lie and be counted as credible. Hence, make it a point to always tell the truth. This isn’t easy and it may not make you popular among those who do this but remember, you can never go wrong with telling the truth.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

How NOT to Introduce Yourself

Filed under: Branding, Career Advice, Professional Development, Skills

Networking is one of the most challenging skills you may have to learn in the world of business. It can be an awkward experience, having the attention of a group of strangers focused on you, and trying to make a good first impression.

It’s an important moment. The person opposite you might be someone who could make or break your career. If you make a good impression, he or she might be able to refer your next big client, or have the influence to help you land that next big contract.

On the other hand, if you act like a doofus, you might alienate someone who might have been an otherwise important connection and relationship.

If you’d like to avoid looking like a jerk, avoid being this guy when introducing yourself:

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

If You Could Choose Your Title, What Would It Be?

Filed under: ambition, Branding, creativity, Your Career

Superman, Spiderman, Batman—they’re all superheroes but these three have one other great thing in common: they chose their own titles. These self-reflective titles give us insight on who they are—one is a teenager accidentally bitten by a radioactive spider, another is a grown man haunted by childhood traumas with a penchant for darkness, and the last combined a symbol from his own planet and Lois’ nickname for him to create his alternate identity. Wouldn’t it be cool if you could choose your own title too?

Beyond the sheer fun of coming up with a name like “King of Code” or “Mistress of Marketing”, a number of studies have shown there are several tangible benefits to choosing your own title.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

Self-Promotion: The Key to Getting Ahead

Filed under: Best Advice, Branding, Career Advice, Your Career

People love their causes…those things you believe in so strongly that you’ll passionately advocate for them. My heartfelt cause is my son, who has autism. When he was growing up, I’d move mountains to get him the best treatment and care possible. I wouldn’t think twice to ask for an appointment, a referral, a meeting. I was fighting for someone who needed my help…whose voice couldn’t be heard above the noise of everyday life that surrounded him.

And yet, I’ve realized that I don’t often extend that same tenacious drive when it comes to advocating for myself. While I’m confident in my ability to write engaging and informative content, and I’d like to believe I’m exemplary at what I do, (see how I tried to work that bit of self-promotion in there?) saying it out loud can sound…arrogant.

Yet, I realize that short of having a cheerleader standing next to me, broadcasting my accomplishments to anyone who’d listen, (“’K’ is for KNOWLEDGEABLE! ‘A’ is for AWESOME!‘T’ is for TALENTED…) how will anyone consider my value if I don’t champion for myself?

Enter self-promotion. But how do we shamelessly promote ourselves without becoming overly offensive or annoying?

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

Check Yourself, Before You Wreck Yourself: 4 Mistakes to Avoid at Work

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Branding, Career Advice, Self Reflection

In the world we live in today – family, work and school may only be among the few things that occupy our minds on a daily basis. From the moment we wake up in the morning down to the last second before going to sleep, it is not uncommon for our actively thinking minds to never catch a break. However, it is very important for us not to lose ourselves despite all the chaos.

On average, we spend about 8 hours a day or more at work – that may be longer than the hours of sleep we get each day! Yet, many of us tend to be so consumed with our day to day responsibilities that we end up giving less importance to the actions that we should be taking for our own good. Unfortunately, many of these actions which we are/are not taking are putting us in a position which may hurt us in the future. I decided to compile a short, but important list of mistakes we should all do our best to avoid making at work – for the sake of our own progression!

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

How to Own Your Talent, Ambition, and Success

Filed under: Attitude, Branding, Career Advice, Quick Tips

You need to own your – fill in the blanks: success, authority, confidence, power, compassion, status, role, product, influence, etcetera. Yet every time you hear someone use the idea of owning something – your talent, skill, ambition, commitment – they always say it as though what you need to “own” is self-evident but with little or no indication as to how.

I am willing to bet that most people who tell you to “own it,” if you ask them “How?” they would fill the air with nothing that can actually tell you what to do as they navigate their way past that treacherous “How?” as fast as they can.

“You need to own your…” carries with it a serious burden because it sounds really good if not essential to do, but when you try and can’t because you have no process for accomplishing such ownership you end up feeling like there’s something wrong with you.

Click here to read the rest >>

How Influential Are You? Measure It!

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Branding, Self Reflection, Skills

It’s simple, influence matters. It matters in your job and your private life. In fact, influence is part of every human interaction. Just think of parents influencing their children, political or religious leaders influencing their followers, CEOs influencing employees, sales people influencing customers, friends influencing each other and the list goes on…

Influential people have an edge over others who are not influential because with influence comes the ability to make others listen to what you have to say. Influence gives people the power to change beliefs and drive actions and behaviours in others and this is important in all aspects of life, whether you are a CEO of a global company, a sales rep, a football coach or someone that is simply trying to get friends to do or believe something.

So what makes us influential then?

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>