Blog

Category: Attitude

7 Ways Mentally Strong People Handle Stress

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Decision Making, Stress

While stress causes some people to crumble, mentally strong people continue to thrive in the midst of added tension. In fact, they view adversity as an opportunity for self-growth. Whether they’re dealing with financial setbacks, health problems, or workplace difficulties, mentally strong people don’t let stress drag them down.

Here are seven ways mentally strong people handle stress effectively:

1. They accept that stress is part of life.

While some people waste time and energy thinking things like, “I shouldn’t have to deal with this,” mentally strong people know that setbacks, problems, and hardships are inevitable. When stressful situations arise, they devote their efforts into doing what they can to move forward. Even when they can’t change the circumstances, they know they can always take steps to improve their lives.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

Handling Conflicts at Work

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Communication, Good Habits, Relationships

Conflict is a natural aspect of human interaction. Sooner or later, we all bump heads with someone in the workplace. Since productivity and employee morale are on the line when conflict becomes an issue in the workplace, it is imperative that leaders and managers quickly resolve the issue. This is where having a conflict resolution strategy comes into play.

The Faster You Resolve Conflict, The Faster Everyone’s Productivity Gets Back On Track.

Conflict and the emotions that fuel it – anger, frustration and stubbornness – are huge wastes of time. And none of these emotions benefit anyone. This is why you need to resolve conflict quickly and easily, so your employees can go back to focusing on their work. To assist you in your conflict resolution strategy, I have put together five proven tips.

Click here to view the rest on LinkedIn >>

Are You Really a Good Team Player?

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Good Habits, Professional Development, Relationships, teams

“Are you a good team player?” I’m sure you’ve been asked that question in an interview before, and it’s highly likely you’ve posed it to someone else too. It has truly become one of those commonplace questions where the response “yes I am” is often delivered, as if on autopilot.

Rating oneself as an effective collaborator shouldn’t be taken lightly. This is because if you meet an interviewer or manager like me, you’re going to be challenged for proof as to why you believe you are. I’m going to dig for evidence.

So where does this evidence come from?

Funnily enough, it often comes from experiencing a dysfunctional team scenario. Whether it’s working in an environment rife with negative internal politics, perpetual personal show-boating or personality clashes, whatever the scenario, if you can articulate or demonstrate your ability to set aside personal differences to achieve a collective goal, you’ve got my attention.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

The 5 Best Ways to Say ‘No’ to Your Coworkers

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication, Office Politics, Psychology

You have to say ‘yes’ to a lot of things throughout your day. You answer emails and questions, get roped into mandatory meetings, and need to pick up projects at the last minute in order to meet company deadlines. In some cases, you won’t have a choice about those new tasks that get added to your already-full plate. And in almost every situation, it feels easier to say yes and pick up another assignment rather than risk upsetting a colleague, boss, or people who depend on you. But saying yes too often — or every time — has negative affects, too.

If you’re constantly shifting your schedule to accommodate a new project, or you’re picking up the slack for another coworker on a frequent basis, your own work will suffer. You might think that it’s showing you can be a team player, or that it’s just a one-time occurrence that won’t happen again. But habits are rooted in repeated events, and you can be sure that if you’re in the habit of saying yes too much, that eventually you’ll wonder where all your time went.

If you want to prevent this, or if you’re already at that point and need to get out of the cycle, there are effective ways to say ‘no’ without damaging your workplace relationships, while also establishing clear boundaries for yourself. In some cases, those boundaries are good to let others know where you stand, but more often than not they’re the most beneficial to helping you see where your priorities lie. It makes you more productive and ensures that when you do say yes to a new project, you won’t be burnt out and will be able to give it your full attention. Here’s a list of five tips you can use as a starting point, and adapt for the situations where you need to turn down a request.

Click here to read the rest on Cheat Sheet >>

How To Manage A Disgruntled Team Member

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication

Nobody likes being the bad guy—or gal. The desire to be liked and accepted can be overwhelming for some people, oftentimes clouding one’s judgment about the best course of action to take when uncertainty presents itself.

However, sometimes being the bad guy is necessary to get things done. The second that one places self-interest above that of the team or the mission of the organization is the second that company objectives are placed at risk.

It’s no secret that different folks require different strokes (of leadership). My high school football coach used to say, “some people need a pat on the back; others need a kick in the [you know what].” There are certain instances where a democratic undertaking can prove more beneficial whereas other occurrences may beckon a more authoritative approach.

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >>

10 Belief Triggers that Sabotage Your Success

Filed under: Attitude, Best Advice, Career & Money, Success

Some of our inner beliefs can trigger failure before it happens. They sabotage change by cancelling its possibility! Discover how to recognize these sabotaging beliefs and learn what you can do about them.

I’m sure you’ve met him, or her. That person who says he’ll finish the project tomorrow, but tomorrow never comes. Or the person who promises to call as soon as she gets home, but you never hear from her.

We know lots of people like this. If we’re a hard case, we cut them out of our lives. If we’re a “softie”, we make excuses, and try to let it go. Either way, these people, who make promises to change one day and excuses not to the next, exist.

And, we may have even done this ourselves! I know I have. For those of us who admit to it, we know our genius becomes more acute when it’s our turn to change how we behave. That’s when we fall back on a set of beliefs that trigger denial, resistance, and ultimately self-delusion. These beliefs are more wicked than excuses. An excuse is the handy explanation we offer when we disappoint other people. It is acute and convenient, often made up on the spot. Basically an excuse is a variation on “The dog ate my homework,” and these are so abused it’s a wonder anyone believes them.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

To Err Is Human. To Apologize Is Humane.

Filed under: Attitude, Good Habits, Personality, Social Impact

Conflict is a natural and inevitable part of being human. At home or in the workplace, different opinions, perspectives, and values intersect to create interactions that are challenging and taxing to navigate, even at the highest levels of leadership. For example, in a recent survey, CEOs rate conflict management skills as their most important area for professional development.

Handling conflict can become even more challenging when we are the offending party. When we are responsible for hurting someone, we often get angry at the person we harmed, avoid the situation, or try to rationalize our behaviour rather than apologizing for it.

However, a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences highlights the importance of apology in repairing and strengthening our relationships. This research examined how people respond when those who offended them offered an apology. The longitudinal nature of this investigation also meant that the researchers could examine what effect the apology had after the event occurred and track forgiveness levels in the weeks ahead.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>