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Category: Your Career

6 Simple Ways to Prepare Your Career for Fall

Filed under: Career Advice, Goals, Professional Development, Strategy, Your Career

A long, relaxing summer can leave you feeling like you’re ready to hit the ground running this fall. Consider pausing for a moment and thinking about what you want for the rest of 2018, plus what you think it’ll take for you to make it happen.

Here’s how to make sure you’re in a good place professionally this fall and beyond.

1. Spruce up your workspace

While you can’t control what’s going on around you — especially in an open office — there’s nothing like being able to really focus because you aren’t bogged down by clutter where you work. This also applies to your home office — whether it’s a desk in a formal room or the dining room table.

Whether you’re a fan of Marie Kondo or the ancient art of feng shui, the concept that you can be influenced by your environment — for good or for bad — is nothing new.

“By organizing, you hone your sensitivity to joy and you also clarify your sense of value,” Kondo tells CNBC. “You can use that knowledge and ability to better enhance decision making skills to your own career, and really you’ll be able to better answer questions such as, ‘What am I looking for in my looking for in my career? What makes me comfortable?’ So in that way it creates real transformation in your career as well.”

So take some time to optimize your space in a way that makes you feel happy and efficient.

Schedule an Ikea run for convenient hanging files and bins, or pull a Lifehacker and go vertical — creating a wall full of shelves and storage. Make space on your computer for incoming files by moving things you don’t need immediate access to onto a hard drive, and delete things that aren’t of value.

Your workspace likely also includes your cellphone — so if you’re having storage problems, you might want to look into how much space photos and other items are taking up and then purge the ones you don’t need or back up the ones you love to the cloud, just in case!

2. Re-evaluate your goals for the year

What are the top three things you want to have done between now and the end of this  year? You may feel behind, but there are three full months left before December 31 yet, so you still have time!

It’s worth writing them down, making a vision board  and taking a good, hard look at what you’ll realistically have to do to get there.Set yourself manageable goals so you don’t feel disappointed if you can’t reach them.

3. Assess the value of this year’s achievements

Instituting a gratitude practice, no matter how small, can help you focus on what you’ve achieved with the right mindset and free you up to move on to the next accomplishment. Take a minute to reflect on how you felt when you got a positive response from your manager after submitting that huge project — or if you were recognized for your work at a company benefit.

Revisit these feelings by writing down what you’re most proud of having accomplished professionally this year, and let yourself absorb them for as long as you need.

4. Reconnect with your network and mentors

Most of the time, people only reach out to far-flung professional connections when they need a new job. By then, it may be awkward to honestly rekindle a stalled relationship. It’s even better to keep those connections fresh, periodically filling in your network on what’s been going on with your work and life.

Remember that networking is a two way street. Be generous with your help as well, and offer to help your connections if there’s something you have that they need.

If you belong to professional groups that took a summer recess, get excited about getting more involved again this fall. Clubs and affinity groups can be incredible sources of professional and personal inspiration.

Also don’t forget to chip away at your side hustle or passion projects. Block out time to make concrete plans, and make any necessary adjustments to your schedule to accommodate them.

You can continue reading this article on Ladders.

 

5 Things You Deserve From Your Job (No Matter Where You Work)

Filed under: company culture, Professional Development, Respect, Success, Work-Life Balance, Your Career

I have news for you: There’s no such thing as a perfect job. Even the careers that seem like they jumped straight from your dreams and into reality have their downsides—that’s why there’s a paycheck involved.

But, while you might never love every aspect of your job, there are a few things that you absolutely deserve to get from your career—aside from enough money to cover your bills.

Believe me, I get it. It’s easy to think that wanting and needing these things makes you picky, entitled, or high-maintenance. You’re getting paid to be there, so how much else do you really need?

Well, think about it this way: You’re going to invest a large chunk of your time, energy, and attention into your job. That means that a work environment that checks the following boxes isn’t something that you should consider to be meant for just the lucky few—it’s something you deserve just as much.

1. A Safe and Supportive Environment

Let’s start with the basics. You’re more than worthy of feeling safe and supported in your office. You should be able to bring your authentic self (your authentic professional self, of course) into work and not feel worried or threatened when doing so.

Rest assured that your expectations in regards to feeling secure in your surroundings aren’t unreasonable or out of line.

Nobody should have to head into the office day in and day out wondering who’s going to throw them under the bus or stab them in the back. You’re entitled to a basic sense of respect and a company culture that isn’t overflowing with toxicity.

2. A Boss Who’s Invested in Your Growth

When it comes to your career, your manager should be your greatest ally. They should be in the loop on your desires and plans for professional development and provide necessary support and guidance whenever they can.

If you feel like your supervisor is always undermining your accomplishments, offering criticisms that are in no way constructive, and is completely disinterested in your growth and advancement, know that you’re justified in wanting more.

3. An Understanding of Your Life Outside of Work

Work is a big part of your life—but it’s still only a part. It’s not the entirety of your existence, and you’re entitled to an employer who understands that fact.

Endless pings and emails when your team knows you’re away and unplugged. Major hurdles and complaints when you have a family emergency to deal with. Relentless guilt trips when you finally take a well-deserved vacation.

Those are things you shouldn’t have to deal with on a regular basis. You deserve a life outside of your job—and an employer who encourages you to live one.

You can continue reading this article on The Muse.

7 Tips to Rebrand Yourself for an Industry Switch

Filed under: Branding, Career Advice, Confidence, Goals, Job Market, Job Search, Professional Development, Your Career

Ready for a career change, but worried you don’t have the experience or skills to land a job in your desired field? Filling your resume with your previous work experience that has no similarity to the job you’re applying for is likely to land your resume in the trash can. But that doesn’t mean you’re stuck in a career you hate forever.

Dawn Graham, PhD, career coach, psychologist, and author of the book Switchers: How Smart Professionals Change Career–and Seize Success, says rebranding your professional experience is key to a successful career switch. “When you’re making a switch, you need to be a good fit for the role, and while some of your skills and experiences may be transferrable, many may not be,” she says. Here’s how you can prove that you’re worthy of the title, even when your resume shows no previous experience in the field.

1. Change your social presence

Use social media to your advantage to rebrand yourself in your new career area. Follow thought leaders in your target industry and comment on their posts. Connect with relevant industry groups and associations, share relevant and interesting articles within your online network, comment on posts, attend the biggest industry conferences, and develop a network of contacts in the industry. “Technology makes it easier than ever to market yourself in a way that appeals to the audience you choose,” says Graham. The more you can demonstrate that you’re serious and invested in your new target industry, the more credible you will seem.

2. Find your transferrable skills

Rebranding yourself takes time and introspection. Everyone has transferrable skills, even if you think you don’t. Graham gives the example of a recruiter who wants to move into social media marketing. “You can show off your customer research, analytics, and technical savvy skills,” she says. Demonstrating how you can reach new customers using the same skill set you used to uncover qualified candidates is a way to prove that your experience is relevant.

To determine your skills, Graham recommends breaking down achievements. “If you contributed to saving a large client, consider the steps that got you to that result–perhaps problem solving, diplomacy, creativity, and influencing.” Do the same with other accomplishments and you’ll soon notice a pattern of core strengths. Try going through this exercise with a colleague or manager who may be able to see strengths that you are overlooking.

3. Do your research

In order to find out what skills and experiences are most relevant to your new career choice, spend time learning as much as you can about your target position. Speak with professionals in your target industry, look for volunteer positions in the industry, take courses, and attend professional events to learn what experiences and skill sets are most valuable in the new industry.

4. Don’t lead with your title

While most of us use our job title when introducing ourselves, this can be an error when you’re switching careers. Many companies use language that doesn’t translate outside the industry. A title can cause confusion for someone in another industry, and biases their opinion toward your application. They may think right away that you’re not a good fit without reading further into your experiences. Instead of focusing on your title, place the emphasis on your value–the skills you developed in that position.

5. Know your audience

In order to highlight your value and position yourself as a good fit for the job, you need to know the challenges the hiring manager is trying to solve. “Many job seekers have incredible accomplishments, but without knowing what is important to your audience, you risk leading off with accomplishments that, while impressive, lead the hirer to think you’re not a fit for the role,” says Graham.

When in a job interview, make one of your first questions about the challenges the company or department is facing at this time. Once you find out the hiring company’s pain points, you can select the achievements from your background that best align with what the hiring manager is looking for in the role.

6. Cherry-pick experiences

Some of your best accomplishments and achievements may not be impressive to the hiring manager if they have no relation to the job you’re applying for. To be most effective in rebranding yourself professionally, select the parts of your experience that align most closely with your target role. To make your application in this new field stronger, highlight these experiences in your LinkedIn profile.

If hiring managers are reviewing your resume and then jump over to LinkedIn and see a whole different type of experience highlighted, they may be confused and cause them to put aside your resume. Rebranding your professional experience may mean dropping what you think are some of your best accomplishments, but by focusing on “fit” first, you will have a better chance of a recruiter recognizing you as a potential candidate for the position.

7. Justify the switch

“Every hiring manager wants to know why this job at this company at this time,” says Graham. Your answer to this question will be especially important if you’re a career switcher.

You’re Invited: Legal Services Candidate Open House

Filed under: Goals, Hiring, Interviews, Job Search, Legal, Networking, Recruiting & Hiring, Temp Work, Your Career

YOU’RE INVITED

Solomon Page Legal Services Candidate Open House
Wednesday, May 17th
1:00pm – 4:00pm

Join the Solomon Page team to enjoy light refreshments while registering for exciting upcoming legal opportunities. We have new projects every week, and are eager to meet document review attorneys of all levels. Registering with Solomon Page is an important first step for consideration. Informative group sessions will be held to discuss the benefits and the resources provided to our exclusive community.

Added bonus! Brush up your resume with Legal Services East Coast Managing Director Julie Favetta, who will be hosting Resume Workshops throughout the day. These workshops give you exclusive access to over 20 years of experience working with clients and placing candidates at Top 50 Law Firms and Fortune 500 Companies.

To confirm your attendance, please RSVP before May 14th by emailing RSVP@solomonpage.com with your resume attached and preferred time slot: 

1:00PM – 1:30PM
1:45PM – 2:15PM
2:30PM – 3:00PM
3:15PM – 3:45PM
Space is limited and we will only be able to meet with individuals that RSVP with their resume to the email address noted above. We look forward to seeing you soon!

5 Things No One Will Tell You At Your First Job

Filed under: Career Advice, Your Career

It’s your first job. It’s hard not to be excited. There is so much to learn and a lot of it will be told to you directly but there will be so many important lessons you won’t even realize your absorbing until later. But here is a jumpstart on some of the things no one is telling you at your first job.
Your life’s greater purpose.
Sure, many of us are lucky to land a role that points us down the perfect path. But your greater life’s purpose probably isn’t directly tied to the workplace — it’s a lot more complex than that. It’ll take time for you to grow as an individual before you decide what you value most in the world, and this first role might not give that to you.
Anything you don’t ask about.
Remember, this job is your responsibility. If you don’t ask questions, you’re not going to get answers. Soak up everything you see around you, but don’t forget to put the queries out there. It’s time to take charge of your role, and asking the right questions is the best way to begin.

Click here to read the rest on LEVO >>

Why Curiosity is so Important in Your Career

Filed under: Your Career

The legend has it that when humans discovered the potato plant, many died because of it. They have eaten the fruits and leafs of the plant which turned out to be poisonous. Sad and angry, they gather all the potato plants (fruits, leaves, roots) they could find and set them on fire to wreck this malefic organism. When the roots started to cook on the fire, the smell made everyone wonder what could that astonishing aroma can be.
Most people put more hay on the fire to make sure the plant will die, but a few curious ones took the roots out of the fire and tasted the wonderful smelling oval shaped object. They didn’t die, and now, all of us can enjoy the potato.
Did you know that latest medical research has found that eating carrots can help smokers improve lung health, but taking beta-carotene supplements increases their risk of lung cancer?
Did you know that there is a city in this world that is illegal not to smile at all times except funerals and visits to the hospital?
Curiosity can cost you, sometimes a bit more than you can chew. However, being curious about the right things is opening many, many doors for you.

Click here to read the rest on Work Happy Now >>

10 tips to master the art of the career humblebrag

Filed under: Networking, Social Media, Your Career

Modesty is the best policy, right? Not when it comes to describing your professional accomplishments. Here’s how to master the art of the self-promotion to advance your career.

In today’s hyper-connected social media-centric culture, there aren’t many topics that are off-limits. People seem comfortable sharing the most intimate details about meals, travel, kids, pets and personal drama, not to mention their feelings and opinions on politics, current events and religion. But there’s one subject that seems to render even the most outspoken people mute: their professional success. And that’s a big problem.

Click here to read the rest on CIO >>