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Category: Social Impact

Business is a Battlefield: Veterans in the Workforce

Filed under: Holiday, Social Impact, Veterans

Each November 11th we observe Veterans Day, a national holiday honoring military service members and veterans who help protect our nation and personal freedoms. It’s no secret that veterans make great employeesand not just in government jobs. Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) shares their experiences and insights about hiring veterans as employees. Here’s what they had to say.

Our military service members are a cut above. They risk their lives and sacrifice family togetherness to protect our freedoms. Military training results in skilled team players who execute tasks efficiently and effectively. They’re polite, respectful, responsible and accountable. Delivering excellence is second-nature, even in the face of uncertainty, exhaustion or fear. And they achieve all of this with a work ethic that’s off the charts. No wonder veterans are highly sought-after employees!

It’s easy to draw parallels between the work world and the battlefield.

“Competition is tough. So is the military. An entrepreneur cannot succeed without a dedicated group behind them. Imagine if:

  • Your company had the ‘failure is not an option’ drive of the Navy Seals.
  • Each team member approached a client or sales call with the strategy and precision of a military operation.
  • Your company culture demanded the ‘service before self’ and ‘no man left behind’ values of the Green Berets.

That’s what ‘Battlefield to Boardroom’ leadership and veterans can bring to your organization.”   ― Victoria R. Bondoc, President, Gemini

“We founded our company specifically to hire veterans and service-disabled veterans. We learned that above all else, veterans returning from the battlefield want a good job where they can once again be a contributing member of a team.” ― Jose M. Perez, President/Founder, Frontline Support Solutions, LLC

Continue reading on Inc.

How Successful People Build Exceptional Professional Relationships

Filed under: Best Advice, Relationships, Social Impact, Your Career

Professional success is important to everyone, but still, success can and does (and definitely should) mean different things to different people.

But one fact is universal. Real success, the kind that exists on multiple levels, is impossible without building great relationships. Real success is impossible unless you treat other people with kindness, regard, and respect.

After all, you can be a rich jerk… but you will also be a lonely jerk.

Here’s how successful people build unusually successful business relationships:

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

To Err Is Human. To Apologize Is Humane.

Filed under: Attitude, Good Habits, Personality, Social Impact

Conflict is a natural and inevitable part of being human. At home or in the workplace, different opinions, perspectives, and values intersect to create interactions that are challenging and taxing to navigate, even at the highest levels of leadership. For example, in a recent survey, CEOs rate conflict management skills as their most important area for professional development.

Handling conflict can become even more challenging when we are the offending party. When we are responsible for hurting someone, we often get angry at the person we harmed, avoid the situation, or try to rationalize our behaviour rather than apologizing for it.

However, a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences highlights the importance of apology in repairing and strengthening our relationships. This research examined how people respond when those who offended them offered an apology. The longitudinal nature of this investigation also meant that the researchers could examine what effect the apology had after the event occurred and track forgiveness levels in the weeks ahead.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

Do You Have These 4 Soft-People Skills?

Filed under: Personality, Skills, Social Impact, Success

Have you worked with or for a person with a strong leader-type personality? They’re adept in driving for results and measuring performance. They have no issue delivering hard feedback or making tough decisions. At times however, their sharp edge becomes a limitation. They haven’t spent much time developing their soft people skills and it’s making them less effective in their role. Maybe this even describes you.

In a workshop I was conducting on personality types an example was shared about a boss that everyone in the room had worked for. The general dislike of this individual was still evident as everyone had at least one example of how this person was overbearing and difficult to work for. He was eventually asked to leave the company but only after he left a trail of carnage in his wake. His memory lives on.

If you have a strong leader-type personality, you absolutely must get a handle on developing your soft-people skills. There are 4 Skills in particular that may not come naturally but you can learn.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

The Three Secrets to Engagement

Filed under: Best Advice, Professional Development, Social Impact, Your Career

Companies are taking an increasing interest in employee engagement, and rightly so. Studies continue to emphasize the correlation between levels of engagement and levels of productivity, customer satisfaction, and profitability.

But improving engagement is a challenge. Offering better perks and better benefits helps, but not much. In fact, according to the latest Gallup study, overall levels of engagement haven’t improved much over the last 10 years. The truth is that improving engagement isn’t about adding benefits. It’s more comprehensive than that.

There are three types of engagement and they all need to be addressed if improvement in overall engagement is to be achieved. An organization’s level of engagement is only as strong as the weakest of the three. The three types of engagement are Personal EngagementOrganizational Engagement, andSituational Engagement. Here are insights into each type along with suggestions for improving engagement.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

Urgency in the Millennial Workforce – Possible!

Filed under: Attitude, Professional Development, Social Impact, Societal Shifts

One of the great struggles leaders face is creating urgency in their followers to strive towards organizational goals. A problem that becomes quickly compounded when those followers are millennials and new to their career field. They are dipping their feet into the waters of the “real world” and generally far more committed to finding a job rather than selecting one they’re fully invested in. This creates a unique set of challenges for the leader trying to build urgency in their team. Here are some suggested techniques to implement:

1. Be Chatty – have frequent, consistent conversation with your millennial team members. They have come up in an age and culture where communication never ceases, so become part of it. Utilize different mediums until you learn their patterns and preferences, and be sure to make your conversations about more than just work. Having open lines of communication will allow you to check in on their progress toward goal achievement frequently and will stimulate proactive conversation from them. Knowing they will be talking to you daily will naturally increase the urgency to achieve progress.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

7 Habits of Highly Likeable People

Filed under: Good Habits, Personality, Social Impact, Success

Everyone wants to be well-liked; it’s in our nature as people. But it’s hard to pinpoint what exactly it is that makes us more likeable. Is it a magic charisma that attracts people to us? Or maybe being outgoing and friendly? Or having an agreeable personality that doesn’t put people off?

Though there are plenty of theories floating around about what makes someone well-liked, here are seven things that well-liked people always do—and that you can do today to make yourself a more likeable and magnetic person.

Click here to read the rest on The Muse >>