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Category: Relationships

7 Skills Managers will Need in 2025

Filed under: Leadership, Leadership and Management, Professional Development, Relationships, Strategy

We all know that the work landscape is changing. The jobs that will be in demand are shifting as more are automated by artificial intelligence, machine learning, and robots. Teams are becoming more disparate and globalization has added new collaboration challenges. At the same time, more millennials are taking on management roles, and even our work spaces will undergo changes between now and 2025.

“Change will be happening so quickly that 50% of the occupations that exist today will not exist 10 years from now. So we’re going to be living in an environment that is extremely adaptable and changing all the time,” says Liz Bentley, the founder of Liz Bentley Associates, a leadership development consulting firm.

Amid all of this flux, managers are going to need new skills, too. The staid, hierarchical structures of the past aren’t going to work, she says. So as you plan your future managerial career, be sure to keep these skills at the forefront.

TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT SKILLS
Technology is going to “grow alongside of us,” says Bentley, and there will be no job that is immune from its effects. Of course, it won’t be a straight line from where we are now to machine learning and robots taking over the workplace, but technology will become an ever-present factor in the workplace. That will create new challenges, conflicts, and opportunities related to skill building, workplace roles, data management, privacy, and others. Managers will need to understand technology enough to keep abreast of and anticipate emerging issues.

Some technological developments will work, some won’t, and some will evolve, she says. But the constant is that managers will need to not only be comfortable with embracing new technology, but they’ll also have to be adept at managing the changing relationship between people and emerging tech.

Continue reading on Fast Company >>

10 Reasons Why Your Feedback Falls on Deaf Ears

Filed under: Communication, Feedback, Relationships

Leadership is about developing people, and that includes giving difficult feedback to employees about their performance. Leaders who see corrective feedback as a partnership with their employees and an opportunity to encourage their growth and development reap great rewards in employee engagement and productivity. Yet many leaders avoid the opportunity to give developmental feedback or complain that when they do, the feedback falls on deaf ears.

Here are 10 ways to avoid a “deafening” approach when giving developmental feedback.

Go for the Goal – In many organizations where we consult, employees often tell us their goals are not clear. The manager knows the goals, but it’s as if they are guarding the goal from the employees. No wonder employees ignore feedback or become frustrated with it; if employees don’t know what you expect, it’s difficult to meet your expectations.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

Build A Network: 5 Tips For Small Talk With Senior Colleagues

Filed under: Branding, Career Advice, Communication, Confidence, Networking, Relationships

Connecting with colleagues at work is among the best things you can do to improve your effectiveness in the workplace. And while it’s easy to lean over to Amy in the next cubicle and ask her how her weekend went, when it comes to a more senior colleague in the corner office, the idea of starting a conversation can be intimidating. So what should you say when you hop on an elevator and find yourself one on one with the managing director?

Ask About Them

Generally speaking, people feel comfortable, and enjoy, talking about themselves. While it might be intimidating to start the conversation, the easiest way to get it going is to ask a question to which you know that senior colleague has an answer. Questions about their commute, hobbies and television shows you know they enjoy, or a recent vacation are all lighthearted, easy, and enjoyable. Who doesn’t like talking about the trout they bagged over the weekend, or the latest storyline on Scandal? The point of these conversations is to build some common ground so the next time you find yourself in the elevator you can see if they enjoyed the Mad Men finale as much as you did.

Click here to read the rest on Edge Work >>

8 Secrets of the Boss Employees Genuinely Love to Work For

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Leadership, Professional Development, Relationships

I liked working for some of my bosses. But only one of them was a boss I genuinely loved to work for.

That’s because the bosses we love to work for have not just great technical skills but also qualities that make an impact where it matters the most: in the hearts and minds of the people they lead.

If you are a boss people genuinely love to work for, here are eight traits that set you apart.

1. You believe the unbelievable.
Most people try to achieve the achievable; that’s why most goals and targets are incremental rather than inconceivable.

The best bosses expect more, from others and, most important, from themselves. They show us how to get there. And they bring us along for what turns out to be an unbelievable ride.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

9 Players You Need on Your Management Dream Team

Filed under: Decision Making, Leadership, Relationships, Strategy, teams

I’d like to believe that over the course of 20 years, my co-founder and I have done a fairly competent job of building a senior management dream team.

In doing so, we’ve borrowed liberally from the vernacular of baseball, track, football and basketball to define and describe the exact qualities and characteristics we sought in building the team. Here are the players I think you’ll need to win the next Super Bowl.

1. The five-skill player

In baseball, a five-tool player is someone who can run, throw, field, hit and hit with power. In my business, PR, a five-skill player can attract new business, deepen existing client relationships, help set the agency’s strategic vision, write, and edit.

2. The rabbit

In group track-and-field events, every team needs a rabbit. The rabbit is the person who sets an incredibly fast pace early in the race. She forces the real stars to keep up, enables them to finish strong and, hopefully, set a new world’s record in the process. She’ll constantly be smiling-and-dialing, attending conferences, brunching with prospects and, in short, doing everything in her power to speed up the business development process.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

18 Signs of High Emotional Intelligence

Filed under: Cognitive Ability, Insights, Psychology, Relationships, Self Reflection

When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70 per cent of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held assumption that IQ was the sole source of success.

Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. The connection is so strong that 90 per cent of top performers have high emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is the “something” in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions to achieve positive results.

Despite the significance of EQ, its intangible nature makes it very difficult to know how much you have and what you can do to improve if you’re lacking. You can always take a scientifically validated test, such as the one that comes with the Emotional Intelligence 2.0 book.

Click here to read the rest on Core Spirit >>

7 Phrases You Will Never Hear a Great Leader Say

Filed under: Attitude, Communication, Leadership, Psychology, Relationships

Great leaders know that how they communicate is almost as important as what they communicate. They’re constantly aware that everything they say will be taken to heart by their team, and that they’ll be measured against their own words.

That’s why you’ll never hear them say these common phrases.

1. Because I said so.

Great leadership means building a culture of collaboration and connection, creativity and communication. Relying on authority shuts all those things down.

Instead: “How do we want to tackle this?”

2. Who do you think you are?

Great leaders foster feelings of empowerment and engagement in their team, so everyone can reap the benefits of shared ideas and thoughts. There’s no room for ridicule or belittlement.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>