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Category: Recruiting & Hiring

4 Metrics Recruiters Love to See on Resumes

Filed under: Job Market, Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring, Resume Tips, Strategy

For one, “we know that the human eye processes numbers faster than words,” career expert J.T. O’Donnell said in an interview with Glassdoor. But beyond that, they also “help me as a recruiter give context to the size and scope of the work that you did,” O’Donnell explains.

In any given workday, though, there’s no shortage of specific numbers you could call out: the amount of emails you send, the amount of meetings you attend, the amount of projects you work on. So how do you know which metrics to include?

Glassdoor uses the following four-step framework in their Job Seeker’s Toolkit to help you decide which numbers pack the most punch. Once you add the right metrics throughout your resume, don’t be surprised if the interview offers start rolling in!

1. Growth: What did you add to the company?

When deciding which metrics to include, it’s important to think about the key performance indicators, or KPIs, for your role. For example, salespeople are often assessed on how much revenue they drive, how many new clients they bring in, how many of their customers renew, etc. Whatever your role, think about the numbers that matter most for you: perhaps they’re ones that your boss brings up in weekly meetings, that you find in your performance review, or even that you see in the LinkedIn profiles of people with the same job title as you.

Of these different metrics, think about which ones represent ways you added to the company and helped it grow. Depending on your role, this might include:

  • Website visits
  • Revenue
  • Deals closed
  • Partnerships secured
  • Candidates hired
  • New technologies/processes adopted

Examples:

  • Authored 150 articles over the course of one year, driving 500,000 unique website visits
  • Vetted and reached out to roughly 30 prospects per day, resulting in 20 closed deals in Q1 and $120,000 in revenue (+22% to quota)
  • Optimized 15 landing pages during the course of the internship, resulting in 17% lift in organic search traffic

2. Reduction: What did you help the company save?

In many cases, what you help your company reduce or eliminate can be just as important as what you add to it. In fact, certain roles focus their energy entirely on helping companies save or reduce in order to operate more efficiently. Think about whether you have a concrete way to measure how you’ve helped your company save or reduce the following:

  • Time
  • Budget
  • Client turnover
  • Employee turnover
  • Website bounce rate

Examples:

  • Identified three major bottlenecks in the hiring process and spearheaded taskforce to implement new technologies and strategies to overcome them, resulting in 31% faster time-to-hire
  • Led website architecture redesign, leading to a two-second faster load time and 16.5% decrease in bounce rate
  • Conducted internal budget audit and discovered five key areas of redundant spending, saving $23,000 per year

3. Impact: How many people did your work help?

A great way to illustrate how much value you can add to a company is by showing them how many people you’ve previously helped. This doesn’t just have to be people outside of your company like users or clients; it can also include those within your company. Look through the following “people” metrics, and think about which ones might be relevant to your role:

  • Number of team members you’ve led
  • Number of users or customers your work impacted
  • Number of stakeholders involved in a project
  • Number of clients you managed
  • Number of employees you supported (for a function like IT or HR)

Examples:

  • Coached, mentored and led a team of seven direct reports on the factory floor to ensure top-notch quality of products used by millions of consumers
  • Conceptualized and executed a multi-touch blog, social and email marketing campaign that reached 200,000 unique impressions
  • Oversaw both day-to-day and strategic HR operations for a company of 75 people

You can continue reading this article on Glassdoor.

You’re Invited: Legal Services Candidate Open House

Filed under: Goals, Hiring, Interviews, Job Search, Legal, Networking, Recruiting & Hiring, Temp Work, Your Career

YOU’RE INVITED

Solomon Page Legal Services Candidate Open House
Wednesday, May 17th
1:00pm – 4:00pm

Join the Solomon Page team to enjoy light refreshments while registering for exciting upcoming legal opportunities. We have new projects every week, and are eager to meet document review attorneys of all levels. Registering with Solomon Page is an important first step for consideration. Informative group sessions will be held to discuss the benefits and the resources provided to our exclusive community.

Added bonus! Brush up your resume with Legal Services East Coast Managing Director Julie Favetta, who will be hosting Resume Workshops throughout the day. These workshops give you exclusive access to over 20 years of experience working with clients and placing candidates at Top 50 Law Firms and Fortune 500 Companies.

To confirm your attendance, please RSVP before May 14th by emailing RSVP@solomonpage.com with your resume attached and preferred time slot: 

1:00PM – 1:30PM
1:45PM – 2:15PM
2:30PM – 3:00PM
3:15PM – 3:45PM
Space is limited and we will only be able to meet with individuals that RSVP with their resume to the email address noted above. We look forward to seeing you soon!

7 Job Interview Habits of Super Persuasive People

Filed under: Confidence, Job Search, Recruiting & Hiring, Your Career

A job interview is an opportunity to sell yourself. It is your opportunity to prove to the interviewer that you possess the skills necessary to take the company forward and that you are someone who can be trusted.

The most important persuasion tool you have in your entire arsenal is integrity.–Zig Ziglar

If the interview was successful, then you have clearly communicated what you have to offer, and have gained another friend–and hopefully a new job.

Persuasive people know how to prepare for and excel at interviews. Here are 7 things super persuasive candidates do to gain the trust and enthusiasm of the interviewer.

1. They study up

Prior to the interview, learn everything you can about the job you are applying for and the company. You can be far more persuasive when you understand and discuss how your skills align with those of the position you are interviewing for and the company’s mission and future vision.

Click here to read the rest on Inc.com >>

Is An On-Demand Workforce The Future Source Of Talent?

Filed under: Insights, Job Search, Recruiters, Recruiting & Hiring

Contingent workers. Contractors. Agency Temps. No matter what you call them, your industry, or your location, most of you use them a part of your workforce strategy. And that is not likely to change in the future.

Temporary labor isn’t new – it’s always been an alternative, often used during turbulent economic times. According to the Coltivar Group (http://bit.ly/1M35DCM) “In a bullish economy, the demand for contingent labor is strong. This is most likely because organizations are trying to grow with the economy, and using contingent workers allows them to work with experts when needed, without the long-term costs of hiring them.”

So it’s not surprising that there was an increase in the use of a contingent workforce during the turbulent Great Recession. What may be surprising is that we’re not seeing the historical return to permanent employees with an improved economy. Other factors for the upward trend include globalization, knowledge-driven work, and shift from “traditional” work as baby-boomers retire and Millennials increase their percentage of the workforce.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>

Recruiting Better Talent With Brain Games And Big Data

Filed under: Best Advice, Big Data, Recruiting & Hiring, Strategy

The job interview hasn’t changed much over the years. There are the resumes, the face-to-face meetings, the callbacks — and the agonizing wait, as employers decide based on a hunch about who’s best suited for the job.

Some companies are selling the idea that new behavioral science techniques can give employers more insight into hiring.

For most of her life, Frida Polli assumed she’d be an academic. She got her Ph.D, toiled in a research lab and started a post-doctorate program before she realized she’d been wrong.

Polli didn’t want to study neuropsychology — she wanted to use it in business.

“People have always wanted to find a way to assess someone’s cognitive and emotional traits in an objective way that might give them a sense of: What is this person really ideally suited for?” she says.

Click here to read the rest on NPR >>