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Category: Professional Development

How to Pull Off One More Career Win Before the Year’s Over

Filed under: Goals, How To, Professional Development, Strategy

How many times have you already said that you can’t believe it’s September? And then went through your mental list of everything you said you’d accomplish this year way back in January and felt resigned to the fact that those will now have to be 2018 goals?

Well, before you write off the year, I have a little bit of good news for you. And that good news is that there’s still plenty you can do to set and achieve a new career goal by the end of the year!

Here’s are four steps that’ll get you to where you want to be:

1. Document Your Goal

Your goal might be to get a promotion with your current company. Or you might want a fresh start at a new job. Or, perhaps you just want to learn a new skill.

Whatever you’re hoping to do this year, start by tuning out what everyone around you is working toward right now. No really, forget their goals and focus on your own. After all, just because Jaime wants a promotion, doesn’t mean that’s what you should want.

Once you’re focused on you, write your goal down somewhere that’ll you see it a lot. A sticky note on your bathroom mirror, a reminder in your phone, a tattoo on your hand—whatever you know will work best.

For example, last year I stayed on top of my goal by setting a calendar event for December 31st and creating monthly reminders for the first day of every month. This might sound silly (and maybe even a little annoying), but it really kept me on top of things.

Continue reading on The Muse…

7 Skills Managers will Need in 2025

Filed under: Leadership, Leadership and Management, Professional Development, Relationships, Strategy

We all know that the work landscape is changing. The jobs that will be in demand are shifting as more are automated by artificial intelligence, machine learning, and robots. Teams are becoming more disparate and globalization has added new collaboration challenges. At the same time, more millennials are taking on management roles, and even our work spaces will undergo changes between now and 2025.

“Change will be happening so quickly that 50% of the occupations that exist today will not exist 10 years from now. So we’re going to be living in an environment that is extremely adaptable and changing all the time,” says Liz Bentley, the founder of Liz Bentley Associates, a leadership development consulting firm.

Amid all of this flux, managers are going to need new skills, too. The staid, hierarchical structures of the past aren’t going to work, she says. So as you plan your future managerial career, be sure to keep these skills at the forefront.

TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT SKILLS
Technology is going to “grow alongside of us,” says Bentley, and there will be no job that is immune from its effects. Of course, it won’t be a straight line from where we are now to machine learning and robots taking over the workplace, but technology will become an ever-present factor in the workplace. That will create new challenges, conflicts, and opportunities related to skill building, workplace roles, data management, privacy, and others. Managers will need to understand technology enough to keep abreast of and anticipate emerging issues.

Some technological developments will work, some won’t, and some will evolve, she says. But the constant is that managers will need to not only be comfortable with embracing new technology, but they’ll also have to be adept at managing the changing relationship between people and emerging tech.

Continue reading on Fast Company >>

17 Skills that are Hard to Learn but will Pay off Forever

Filed under: Good Habits, Professional Development

The best things in life may be free, but that doesn’t mean they won’t take time, sweat, and perseverance to acquire.

That’s especially the case when it comes to learning important life skills.

To ascertain which talents are worth the investment, one Quora reader posed the question: “What are the hardest and most useful skills to learn?”

We’ve highlighted our favorite takeaways, as well as a few other skills we thought were important.

1. Empathy

“You can be the most disciplined, brilliant, and even wealthy individual in the world, but if you don’t care for or empathize with other people, then you are basically nothing but a sociopath,” writes Kamia Taylor.

Empathy, as business owner Jane Wurdwand explains, is a fundamental human ability that has too readily been forsworn by modern business.

“Empathy — the ability to feel what others feel — is what makes good sales and service people truly great. Empathy as in team spirit — esprit de corps — motivates people to try harder. Empathy drives employees to push beyond their own apathy, to go bigger, because they feel something bigger than just a paycheck,” she writes.

2. Mastering your sleep
There are so many prescribed sleep hacks out there it’s often hard to keep track. But regardless of what you choose, establishing a ritual can help ensure you have restful nights.

Numerous studies show that being consistent with your sleep schedule makes it easier to fall asleep and wake up, and it helps promote better sleep in general.

Continue reading on Time…

How to Network When You Aren’t Sure What You Need

Filed under: Attitude, Communication, Confidence, Networking, Professional Development

Networking is something that makes a lot of people cringe—and understandably so. When people think of the word “networking,” images of forced and insincere flattery comes to mind.

But that’s more often the case when networking is an event—a ritual you perform every once in awhile. Practiced as part of a routine, it can be a lot more livable—just another way of building meaningful relationships. The best time to network is not when you need something, but when you don’t actually have a specific ask in mind. Here’s why, and how to get better at networking when there’s no obvious need you’re trying to fulfill.

WHY YOU NEED TO NETWORK WHEN IT FEELS POINTLESS
Many will immediately recoil at the idea of networking outside the confines of specific events, purpose-built for the occasion, and when there’s a clearly defined need they’re trying to fulfill. After all, networking usually requires pursuing people individually, even if it’s on a casual basis and possibly getting rejected or ignored over and over again.

Continue reading the original article on Fast Company…

9 Skills that Pay Dividends Forever

Filed under: Good Habits, Personality, Professional Development, Psychology, Self Reflection

Some of the most important skills in life are not taught in school. Here are 9 you won’t want to miss out on.

The further along you are in your career, the easier it is to fall back on the assumption that you’ve made it and have all the skills you need to succeed. The tendency is to focus all your energy on getting the job done, assuming that the rest will take care of itself. Big mistake.

New research from Stanford tells the story. Carol Dweck and her colleagues conducted a study with people who were struggling with their performance. One group was taught to perform better on a task that they had been performing poorly. The other group received a completely different intervention: For a task they performed poorly, they were taught that they weren’t stuck and that improving their performance was a choice. They discovered that learning produces physiological changes in the brain, just like exercise changes muscles. All they had to do was believe in themselves and make it happen.

When the groups’ performance was reassessed a few months later, the group that was taught to perform the task better did even worse. The group that was taught that they had the power to change their brains and improve their performance themselves had improved dramatically.

The primary takeaway from Dweck’s research is that we should never stop learning. The moment we think that we are who we are is the moment we give away our unrealized potential.

The act of learning is every bit as important as what you learn. Believing that you can improve yourself and do things in the future that are beyond your current possibilities is exciting and fulfilling.

Still, your time is finite, and you should dedicate yourself to learning skills that will yield the greatest benefit. There are nine skills that I believe fill the bill because they never stop paying dividends. These are the skills that deliver the biggest payoff, both in terms of what they teach you and their tendency to keep the learning alive.

Continue reading the original article on Inc…

15 Habits of Self-Made Millionaires

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Goals, inspiration, Professional Development, Strategy, Success

Success doesn’t crop up overnight. All self-made millionaires had to start somewhere.

Much of their transformation from ordinary to seven-figure status can be attributed to “rich habits,” a term coined by Thomas C. Corley, who spent five years researching the daily habits of 177 self-made millionaires.

“From my research, I discovered that daily habits dictate how successful or unsuccessful you will be in life,” he writes in his 2016 book “Change Your Habits, Change Your Life.”

“There is a cause and effect associated with habits. Habits are the cause of wealth, poverty, happiness, sadness, stress, good relationships, bad relationships, good health, or bad health.”

The good news is all habits can be changed, Corley notes. Here are some “rich habits” of self-made millionaires that you can start developing today:

They read consistently.
The rich would rather be educated than entertained. As Corley writes, “Eighty-eight percent of the rich devote thirty minutes or more each day to self-education or self-improvement reading … Most did not read for entertainment … The rich read to acquire or maintain knowledge.”

Corley found that they tend to read three types of books: biographies of successful people, self-help or personal development, and history.

Continue reading the original article on Business Insider…

Wagner College Q&A with Gregg Gavioli

Filed under: Career Advice, Hiring, Job Search, Professional Development

Wagner College invited Gregg Gavioli, Managing Director of the Accounting & Finance division at Solomon Page, to speak to their top 5% of business students, known as “Selects,” at a round table event. The discussion covered the job market, networking, and the finance industry and provided upcoming graduates with an intimate opportunity to ask questions and learn about working as a professional in the accounting and financial industries.

Below is a Q&A excerpt from this meeting.

1. What types of jobs within the industry are threatened the most by the rise of financial technology?

Operations roles. Clearing, customer service, trade execution. Anything that can be automated, off shored, or moved to a lower cost center. If you are open to relocation, many major banks have large service centers in places like Salt Lake, Baltimore, Tampa, Jacksonville, Dallas, and Tennessee. If you are flexible, there can be opportunity there for you.

 

2. Is our generation really worse off than our parents in terms of earning potential?

I don’t think so. Wages are rising. The main point of difference may be if you are carrying student debt. My advice is live frugally for your first 5 years. Don’t eat out often. Make coffee at home. Live with many roommates or parents where possible. Start a 401k as soon as you can.

 

3. The finance industry is overwhelming. I have 2 months until graduation and still have no idea what I want to do. What is my best strategy from this point forward?

You may not know what you want to do any time soon. That’s OK. Field as many interviews and get as many job offers as you can. Take the one that has the most opportunity to learn many things closely aligned with your interest. Learn what you like and what you don’t like in that first job and use it to find your next. You will likely need to do this a few times before you know what “your field” is.  Find something your passionate about, and it will not feel like a job. You don’t want to be watching the clock waiting for the end of the day to run out the door. If it feels that way all the time, change fields.

 

4. What is the single most important quality that you are looking for in an applicant? Particularly a Wagner student going up against the Ivy League?

Ability to communicate effectively. Make eye contact. Is there a fire in your belly? Do I want you on my team? Do you know excel at a high level?

 

5. What do you believe is the best way to write a cover letter to get yourself noticed and receive a response? What should be included? Length?

One page, always customize it, mention why you are the perfect candidate for the role.

 

6. What entry level positions should we be looking for to put ourselves in the best position for a greater opportunity down the road?

Any one that puts you in a positon to learn. Be open to figuring things out on your own. Ask for more work when you need it. Compliance and analytics roles offer long term opportunity as well as anything that can make you a subject matter expert where you can transition to a Project manager or a Business Analyst at some point.

 

7. What areas of the finance industry are up and coming and what areas of the industry do you see dying out within the next 10 years?

Compliance. Big Data, Projects Management, Business Analytics, Analytics, Ad-tech. Analytics related to Advertising, Social Media, and Search engines is an exciting field to explore for finance majors.

 

8. What career paths would you recommend for a finance major, aside from the traditional banking route?

Compliance, analytics, quant, advertising data analysis, FPA, Budget.

 

9. How did you go about expanding your network

Use LinkedIn. Did you create a profile? Have you joined the Wagner Alumni group I created on LinkedIn?  Send a customized email to any Wagner Alumni who may be working at your target company who may be open to meeting you for coffee for advice or helping you with applications. Professional and social groups. HS Groups. Skills Group like compliance, advertising, accounting clubs (IMA, AICPA) etc.

 

10. Did you get a master’s Degree and if so when did you get it.

No. If you are not getting it right away, see if you can get tuition reimbursement from a big employer. It’s most important when advancing up the ladder into management roles and has the biggest payoff there.

 

11. What are your recommendations on preparing for a meeting with a mentor?

Research the mentor. Come prepared with questions based on their background. Use their time wisely.

 

12. What is the most effective way of preparing for an interview?

Research the Company, research interviewer’s profiles, have multiple different questions prepared for different people. Up to 10 questions is not too many. Never say I have no questions at all.

 

13. How can I ensure follow up after an application?

You can’t really but send a customized thank you note, if no response one more check in email is OK and that is the max. Have a thank you note ready to go after the interview in a stamped envelope and drop in the post office box near the company.

For upcoming graduates, our expert recruiters are equipped with the advice and contacts to help jumpstart your professional career. Get in touch today and learn more about our service offerings.