Blog

Category: Leadership

Want Your Best Employees to Never Leave You? Give Them the 7 Things They Need the Most

Filed under: company culture, Leadership, teams

In the quest to crack the code on employee engagement, companies spend hundreds of thousands of dollars each year on wasted efforts to “develop their leaders.”

Since leadership development is broad, it needs to be clearly defined for business outcomes. The common denominator is teaching managers the fine art of people skills. After all, leading an organization is still mostly about people — its most important asset. Without mastering people skills, you simply cannot be a good leader.

But to do that, managers must have a basic understanding of human behavior. What science has already found is that positive emotions are at the root of human motivation. We are wired for it in our creation design.

Therefore, managers must acquire the knowledge of what makes people tick and what inspires human beings to perform at a high level.

1. People at work need to feel safe.
This is true especially as they start a new role or job. They need confidence boosters from their leaders. Emotionally intelligent leaders will build them up through encouragement, praise, and positive affirmation. They will show them hope for the future, ask them about their goals and interests, and give them assurance of a career path. Safety is a basic human need and the best employees want to know where they stand — now and in the future. The best leaders give them that hope by speaking to their needs.

2. People at work need compliments.
“I don’t like to be recognized,” said no human being, ever. Managers have to get into the habit of praising and complimenting their people for their good qualities and work. The companies in Gallup’s study with the highest engagement levels use recognition and praise as a powerful motivator to get their commitment. They found that employees who receive it on a regular basis increase their individual productivity, receive higher loyalty and satisfaction scores from customers, and are more likely to stay with their organization. How regular are we talking? Praise should be given once per week, according to Gallup.

Continue reading on Inc. >>

8 Secrets of the Boss Employees Genuinely Love to Work For

Filed under: Attitude, Behavior in the Workplace, Leadership, Professional Development, Relationships

I liked working for some of my bosses. But only one of them was a boss I genuinely loved to work for.

That’s because the bosses we love to work for have not just great technical skills but also qualities that make an impact where it matters the most: in the hearts and minds of the people they lead.

If you are a boss people genuinely love to work for, here are eight traits that set you apart.

1. You believe the unbelievable.
Most people try to achieve the achievable; that’s why most goals and targets are incremental rather than inconceivable.

The best bosses expect more, from others and, most important, from themselves. They show us how to get there. And they bring us along for what turns out to be an unbelievable ride.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

9 Players You Need on Your Management Dream Team

Filed under: Decision Making, Leadership, Relationships, Strategy, teams

I’d like to believe that over the course of 20 years, my co-founder and I have done a fairly competent job of building a senior management dream team.

In doing so, we’ve borrowed liberally from the vernacular of baseball, track, football and basketball to define and describe the exact qualities and characteristics we sought in building the team. Here are the players I think you’ll need to win the next Super Bowl.

1. The five-skill player

In baseball, a five-tool player is someone who can run, throw, field, hit and hit with power. In my business, PR, a five-skill player can attract new business, deepen existing client relationships, help set the agency’s strategic vision, write, and edit.

2. The rabbit

In group track-and-field events, every team needs a rabbit. The rabbit is the person who sets an incredibly fast pace early in the race. She forces the real stars to keep up, enables them to finish strong and, hopefully, set a new world’s record in the process. She’ll constantly be smiling-and-dialing, attending conferences, brunching with prospects and, in short, doing everything in her power to speed up the business development process.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

How to Dress Like a Leader in Any Work Environment

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Leadership, Quick Tips

There was once a time when every professional, no matter his or her industry, put on a suit each morning.

But today, there are so many interpretations of formal and business casual that it can be easy to look sloppy or over-dressed if you’re not aware of the environment.

Sylvie di Giusto, founder of Executive Image Consulting, works with executives looking to improve how they present themselves and professionals hoping to impress their clients and bosses. In her new book “The Image of Leadership,” she breaks down the five levels of dress code that she uses with her clients.

We’ve represented them below, and included di Giusto’s insight into how to make your clothes work for you in the office:

Click here to read the rest on Business Insider >>

7 Phrases You Will Never Hear a Great Leader Say

Filed under: Attitude, Communication, Leadership, Psychology, Relationships

Great leaders know that how they communicate is almost as important as what they communicate. They’re constantly aware that everything they say will be taken to heart by their team, and that they’ll be measured against their own words.

That’s why you’ll never hear them say these common phrases.

1. Because I said so.

Great leadership means building a culture of collaboration and connection, creativity and communication. Relying on authority shuts all those things down.

Instead: “How do we want to tackle this?”

2. Who do you think you are?

Great leaders foster feelings of empowerment and engagement in their team, so everyone can reap the benefits of shared ideas and thoughts. There’s no room for ridicule or belittlement.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >>

5 Habits You Can Learn From Young Leaders

Filed under: Career Advice, Good Habits, Leadership, Millennials

What does it take to be a young leader? Or to lead people of all ages and truly inspire them?

Many believe years of experience, expert knowledge and firmly developed connections make a leader great. Yet, does time on this earth alone make a leader noteworthy? The military is arguably the best organization at developing young leaders. History tells of young trailblazers like Joan of Arc, who led the French Army at only seventeen; of conquerors like Alexander the Great who controlled the known world before he turned 30. These young leaders thrived without a lifetime of developed knowledge, and instead created experiences as they went.

The modern business world has seen an influx of CEO’s under the age of thirty. Sure, they aren’t conquering nations or leading armies by the thousands, but they have the same qualities of these great leaders from the past. Time has proven that the valor of a leader is not defined by their age, but instead by their raw ability to inspire others to follow them towards the execution of a specific vision.

Young leaders must be able to motivate young and old alike, in addition to bridging the age gaps in between. They are not limited by the number of years they have been alive or what others think of them, so what is it that makes them successful?

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >> 

5 Ways to Lead in Challenging Times

Filed under: Career Advice, inspiration, Leadership, Your Career

What do leaders do when their stock price has dropped 75 percent and it’s their job to get it back up? What should leaders think when the thrilling vision they had for the future has been clouded by economic uncertainty? How do leaders get inspired when their employees are dejected, worried, and distracted–and let’s face it, on some level so are they?

Wait–don’t answer that. You can’t.

Because no matter how much you know about leadership, regardless of what the research says or what best practice implies, there’s only one way to find the right answers to these questions. Leaders need to find them for themselves.

In a time of unprecedented challenge, leaders don’t just need to lead their companies. They also need to lead themselves. They need strategies for improving their effectiveness while sustaining a sense of professional well-being. Every one of us has an internal source of strength and stability. Without care and consideration these renewable resources are seriously at risk.

In order to survive and thrive, leaders can’t just go about business as usual. Business isn’t “usual” anymore. It’s undergoing a seismic shift. Leaders need to get their footing in a shaky reality and learn to embrace the possibilities ahead.

Click here to read the rest on INC >>