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Category: Job Statistics

The Top 10 Jobs That Are Disappearing in the U.S.

Filed under: Job Market, Job Statistics, News

With the rise of robots and AI, as well as ongoing economic changes from globalization, jobs from data entry to manufacturing are under threat in the US.

These are the top 10 jobs that could be on their way out in the US, based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projections for the percent decline in the number of people in these occupations between 2016 and 2026, along with descriptions of the jobs from the Department of Labor’s O*NET careers database.

You can read the rest of this article on Business Insider, and review their entire list of the top 41 jobs that are projected to decline in the US.

 

1. Locomotive firers

They monitor locomotive instruments and watch for dragging equipment, obstacles on rights-of-way, and train signals during run.

Median annual pay, 2017: $60,360

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 1,200

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 300

Projected decline: 78.6%

 

2. Respiratory therapy technicians

They provide respiratory care under the direction of respiratory therapists and physicians.

Median annual pay, 2017: $50,350

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 10,800

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 4,700

Projected decline: 56.3%

 

3. Parking enforcement workers

They patrol assigned areas to issue tickets to overtime parking violators and illegally parked vehicles.

Median annual pay, 2017: $39,030

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 9,400

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 6,100

Projected decline: 35.3%

 

4. Word processors and typists

They use computers, word processors, or typewriters to type letters, forms, reports, or other material.

Median annual pay, 2017: $39,740

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 74,900

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 50,100

Projected decline: 33.1%

 

5. Watch repairers

They repair, clean, and adjust mechanisms of timing instruments, such as watches and clocks.

Median annual pay, 2017: $35,770

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 1,800

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 1,200

Projected decline: 29.7%

 

6. Electronic-equipment installers and repairers (motor vehicles)

They install, diagnose, or repair communications, sound, security, or navigation equipment in motor vehicles.

Median annual pay, 2017: $34,530

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 12,100

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 9,000

Projected decline: 25.6%

 

7. Foundry mold and core makers

They make or form wax or sand cores or molds used in the production of metal castings in foundries.

Median annual pay, 2017: $35,140

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 12,500

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 9,500

Projected decline: 24.0%

 

8. Pourers and casters (metal)

They operate hand-controlled mechanisms to pour and regulate the flow of molten metal into molds to produce castings or ingots.

Median annual pay, 2017: $38,210

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 8,400

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 6,500

Projected decline: 23.4%

 

9. Computer operators

Computer operators monitor and control electronic computer and peripheral electronic data processing equipment.

Median annual pay, 2017: $44,270

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 51,500

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 39,700

Projected decline: 22.8%

 

10. Telephone operators

They provide information to telephone customers by accessing alphabetical, geographical, or other directories.

Median annual pay, 2017: $36,320

Number of people who held this job in the US in 2016: 9,100

Predicted number of people who will hold this job in 2026: 7,000

Projected decline: 22.6%

The Power of Culture in the Workplace

Filed under: company culture, Job Market, Job Statistics, Professional Development, Work-Life Balance

Corporate culture is a concept at the forefront of the employment marketplace—professionals want to feel valued as individuals, not just for their professional contributions.

In order to ensure a fulfilled and productive workforce, employers should build a strong culture to enhance employee morale; this translates to defining the organization’s mission and core values, as well as creating a sense of community amongst employees through professional and personal development.

Our 2018 Market Insights Report shows the impact culture has on professionals from the moment they consider a position through the lifecycle of employment.

1. The Offer: Our study shows that following compensation, corporate culture and work-life balance are the most important factors to consider in a job offer. And while respondents agree that salary is the most significant determinant in accepting an offer, nearly half (40%) of jobseekers would take a position that did not meet their financial expectations but with a company that promotes culture and professional development.

2. Engagement: In this candidate-driven market—the U.S. unemployment rate is below 4%, the lowest in 18 years—hiring quality professionals is only the beginning. In addition to attracting talent, companies must keep their workforce engaged. Our study shows that while people value the financial and tangible aspects of employment—compensation, insurance, 401(k)—they equally value professional growth and fulfillment.

3. Job Satisfaction: We can assume that, to jobseekers and tenured employees alike, culture may not be regarded as the most important aspect of a job, but it is certainly an unequivocal determinant. 93% of all respondents agree that it is important to have a sense of belonging and shared values with their organization. Our results show there is strong correlation between culture and job satisfaction:

    • of the professionals who claimed they fit in ‘very well’ with their culture, 77% were satisfied at their job;
    • of the respondents who fit in ‘somewhat,’ 62% were satisfied;
    • and of the people who didn’t fit in, only 33% were happy in their roles.

4. Retention: As challenging as it is to attract talented professionals, retention is equally as essential. In today’s competitive marketplace companies must invest in retaining top talent, as turnover is not only costly but impacts morale and employee engagement. Culture is a key factor in employee retention—of the people we surveyed who were planning a job change within the next year, only half (50%) noted a positive company culture, compared to the professionals who weren’t planning a job change, of which 90% reported alignment with company culture.

Our study concludes that positive company culture vastly benefits both employers and employees—your external brand is only as strong as your internal culture. In order to perform well employees need to feel appreciated, engaged, and aligned with their company’s mission and core values.

It’s crucial for companies to build and enhance culture for the well-being and productivity of their workforce, as clients will never love a company until the employees love it first. Ultimately, business improves along with employee morale: low turnover, as well as increased motivation, translates to positive results.

 

Stay tuned for more insights where we will reveal steps employers can take to successfully implement a positive company culture and productive work environment.

Jobs with the Biggest Salary Increases in 2018

Filed under: Economy, Job Market, Job Statistics

You would think some of the more sophisticated job titles would realize the biggest increases in wages, but according to Glassdoor’s latest ranking of jobs showing the fastest wage gains over the past year, it is job positions in lower-skill, lower-paying fields that are seeing the most growth.

Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist of Glassdoor said: “Today’s strong labor market may be starting to improve pay across the income spectrum.” He also noted, “April’s pay gains are the fastest we’ve seen in 2018 so far.”

Out of 84 job titles, here are the Top 10 jobs with the fastest year-over-year growth in median base pay for full-time employees:

  1. Financial Advisor: $55,296 (up 6.4%)
  2. Bank Teller: $30,066 (up 5.5%)
  3. Attorney: $101,817 (up 4.7%)
  4. Truck Driver: $53,878 (up 4.5%)
  5. Delivery Driver: $38,955 (up 4.4%)
  6. Web Developer: $65,414 (up 3.9%)
  7. Network Engineer: $71,433 (up 3.6%)
  8. Cashier: $27,923 (up 3.4%)
  9. Web Designer: $51,875 (up 3.4%)
  10. Security Officer: $35,321 (up 3.3%)

As you can see, the wage growth for lower-paying positions like cashier and delivery driver saw very healthy increases. Financial advisor managed to stay in the top spot as those positions require a lot of communication and people skills (which is harder to automate), according to the report.

As for jobs with the least amount of wage growth, here’s what took last place:

  1. Professor: $86,166 (down 3.3%)
  2. Communications Manager: $65,882 (down 2.5%)
  3. Quality Engineer: $71,467 (down 1.5%)
  4. Bartender: $31,668 (down 1.4%)
  5. Maintenance Worker: $39,907 (down 1.4%)
  6. Research Assistant: $30,391 (down 1.2%)
  7. Technician: $45,318 (down 1.1%)
  8. UX Designer: $76,003 (down 0.9%)
  9. Project Manager: $73,575 (down 0.6%)
  10. Consultant: $72,120 (down 0.6%)

The decrease in pay for professors shows the financially unfortunate state of higher education institutions in this country.

You can read the rest of the article here on Ladders.

April 2018 Jobs Report Shows Promising Market for Jobseekers

Filed under: Economy, Job Market, Job Statistics

The U.S. Department of Labor released statistics about the current job market on May 4th. The results pointed to a more promising situation for jobseekers than in recent months or years. Some highlights are as follows:

 

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

3.9%

The jobless rate in the U.S. fell to 3.9% in April, touching the lowest mark since December 2000. The rate had been stuck at 4.1% the previous six months. The economy looks different today than it did in the last days of the tech boom. In 2018, interest rates are lower, economic growth is more moderate and the stock market—while preforming well—hasn’t had nearly the same run-up it had in the 1990s

 

JOBS

164,000

U.S. employers added 164,000 jobs to nonfarm payrolls in April. That was slightly weaker than the 195,000 economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal had expected. But revised figures showed employers added a net 30,000 more jobs than previously estimated in February and March. The monthly pace of hiring this year is 200,000. That’s a healthy clip and stronger than 2017’s average of 182,000 per month.

 

LABOR-FORCE PARTICIPATION

62.8%

The labor-force participation rate fell for the second straight month to 62.8% in April. The rate is near the lowest level recorded since the 1970s, when women were entering the workforce in larger numbers. Friday’s data showed 236,000 Americans exited the labor force in April. That left employers with a smaller pool of available workers and helps explain why the unemployment rate fell

 

You can read the rest of the article here on the Wall Street Journal. 

December Employment Gain Caps Best Year for U.S. Since 1999; Wage Gains Lag

Filed under: Big Data, Economy, Job Statistics

A rise in employment and a falling jobless rate in December capped the best year for the labor market since 1999 and reinforced the U.S. role as the global economy’s standout performer.

The addition of 252,000 jobs followed a 353,000 rise the prior month that was more than previously estimated, a Labor Department report showed today in Washington. The jobless rate dropped to the lowest level since June 2008. The report wasn’t all good news as earnings unexpectedly declined from a month earlier.

An additional 2.95 million Americans found work in 2014, the most in 15 years and a sign companies are optimistic U.S. demand will persist even as overseas markets struggle. The combination of job growth and cheaper gasoline will probably help stretch workers’ paychecks and sustain consumer spending.

Click here to read the rest on Bloomberg >>

Fewer Are Losing Their Jobs

Filed under: Job Statistics, Layoffs

By Floyd Norris | Published: April 12, 2013

The rate of layoffs and discharges has fallen to the lowest level since the government began calculating the figure at the end of 2000, dropping below the level seen in the fall of 2006, before the Great Recession began. More people are leaving their jobs voluntarily and more are also being hired than during the recession, but those rates remain well below the previous peaks. Rates of firings and layoffs are highest in the construction industry, and lowest in government jobs. 

 Read the whole story and related article at nytimes.com >>