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Category: Interviews

7 Ways to Show Emotional Intelligence in a Job Interview

Filed under: Attitude, Interviews, Job Market, Job Search, Personality, Professional Development

Yes, having solid technical skills is important in landing a job, but maybe not as important as you might think. In fact, in a survey of more than 2,600 hiring managers and human resource professionals, 71% stated they valued emotional intelligence in an employee over IQ. What’s more, 75% said they were more likely to promote a highly emotionally intelligent worker; and 59% claimed they’d pass up a candidate with a high IQ but low emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is going to be even more relevant for job hunting in the future too, the Future of Jobs Report from The World Economic Forum ranked emotional intelligence in the top 10 job skills required for 2020. Since more companies are paying attention to hiring people with high emotional intelligence, if you’re looking for a job it’s an important skill to demonstrate in your interview.

Here are 7 ways that to demonstrate emotional intelligence in a job interview:

1. Actively listen

Instead of focusing on a response to the question being asked, give all your attention on the question itself. Don’t give in to the urge that you have to answer the question immediately. Interviewers are looking for a thoughtful response, instead of an immediate one that indicates that you are giving them an answer that you have rehearsed. Repeat the question back in your own words to make sure that you understand it the way that it was intended. If you are not sure if you are answering the question ask the person asking it.

2. Show emotions

Many interviewees, due to nervousness, can came come across as wooden and tightly controlled. It’s not only okay to show some emotion, but the right emotions will form a connection between the interviewer and you. Smiling, as long as it doesn’t appear forced or inauthentic, is always good. Showing enthusiasm and some excitement is also good if it is real. The caveat is not to force any emotions. If the interviewers get a whiff that you are coming across as someone other than yourself, it will cause them to mistrust you and decrease your chances of getting the job.

3. Share the credit for your achievements

Take a cue from professional athletes when they are interviewed after a win or achievement. They always credit their team mates, their team, rather than taking personal accolades. When asked about a project that you are proud of, or that was successful, be sure to share credit with the team, unit, and others who were involved in the project. Make it clear that you are proud to be a member of the group that was involved in the success. This gives more credibility to you being a team player, than if you simply claim that you are, which everyone does.

4. Share how you are trying to improve yourself

The typical advice for answering a question about your weakness is to frame it as something that is actually a strength. For example, claiming to be a perfectionist, or becoming too involved in your job, which can be seem as strengths by an employer. These answers do not cut it any more, as interviewers are looking for something more substantial. When disclosing a weakness be sure to indicate what you are actively doing to work on it and give examples of making progress. Interviewers know that we all have weaknesses and suspect that we may try to hide those in the interview. As long as your weaknesses do not raise any red flags, being honest, open and genuine will help gain their trust and respect.

5. Don’t shy away from talking about conflict

For the question about your strengths, rather than only focusing on your qualifications or technical ability, talk about your ability to work well with others in a teamwork setting. Your ability to adapt to change or setbacks and work well with coworkers and customers is important to bring up. Instead of simply mentioning these things, be prepared to come up with examples of when you had to use those skills. Perhaps there was conflict within your unit or you had to deal with an irate customer. Talk about how you used your soft skills to effectively deal with these situations.

You can read the rest of this article on Fast Company.

Lloyd Solomon Featured in Real Estate REality Check Podcast

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Company News, Insights, Interviews, Professional Development, Solomon Page, Success, Thought Leadership

Lloyd Solomon, Managing Director of Solomon Page, was recently interviewed by Larry Haber in his podcast Leasing REality: Real Estate REality Check.

Larry conducts an ongoing series of weekly conversations with business executives designed to empower emerging and seasoned professionals to reach their full business potential. Using rock ‘n roll, hip hop, and pop culture analogies as the basis for many of his questions, the overwhelming majority of responses from his guests are informative, entertaining, and most importantly, a conduit to help incentivize listeners to become masters of their career and/or business domains.

Lloyd speaks to his journey building his business over the past 28 years, including the highs and lows, and prevalent lessons learned. He gives advice to business owners on how to lead a successful company and satisfied staff, in addition to providing insight to candidates looking to excel in their career.

You can listen to the podcast here.

How to Ask About Promotions in a Job Interview Without Sounding Arrogant

Filed under: Career & Money, Interviews, Job Search

When you sit down for a job interview, it’s perfectly natural to want to know how you’ll be compensated now and in the future. After all, the average job candidate in the United States stays in the job for which they were hired for about four years. After that, it’s time to move up or move on.

But how do you ask about promotions in an interview without making it look like you’re going to move on quickly? Or without coming across like you think you deserve a better job right from the start?

It can be an uncomfortable conversation, but there’s no opting out. In order to choose the opportunity that best fits your career plans, you need to have accurate information about the position. That conversation must involve a glimpse of what promotions and raises might look like if you were to accept a job offer.

Here are three effective questions to help you ask about promotions in an interview without looking presumptuous:

1. ASK, “HOW DO YOU HELP GOOD PERFORMERS GROW IN THIS POSITION?”
Companies attract competitive candidates by offering growth opportunities. It’s very likely that the company you’re interviewing with will want to highlight its efforts to help employees grow and evolve through professional development, education, or experience opportunities.

Continue reading the complete article on Fast Company >>

You’re Invited: Legal Services Candidate Open House

Filed under: Goals, Hiring, Interviews, Job Search, Legal, Networking, Recruiting & Hiring, Temp Work, Your Career

YOU’RE INVITED

Solomon Page Legal Services Candidate Open House
Wednesday, May 17th
1:00pm – 4:00pm

Join the Solomon Page team to enjoy light refreshments while registering for exciting upcoming legal opportunities. We have new projects every week, and are eager to meet document review attorneys of all levels. Registering with Solomon Page is an important first step for consideration. Informative group sessions will be held to discuss the benefits and the resources provided to our exclusive community.

Added bonus! Brush up your resume with Legal Services East Coast Managing Director Julie Favetta, who will be hosting Resume Workshops throughout the day. These workshops give you exclusive access to over 20 years of experience working with clients and placing candidates at Top 50 Law Firms and Fortune 500 Companies.

To confirm your attendance, please RSVP before May 14th by emailing RSVP@solomonpage.com with your resume attached and preferred time slot: 

1:00PM – 1:30PM
1:45PM – 2:15PM
2:30PM – 3:00PM
3:15PM – 3:45PM
Space is limited and we will only be able to meet with individuals that RSVP with their resume to the email address noted above. We look forward to seeing you soon!

The Right Way to Discuss Your Failures in a Job Interview

Filed under: Interviews, Personality, Publishing

In interviewing hundreds of people, I’ve found that the way a candidate answers one key question tells me more about them than any other. I’ll usually wait until the candidate has relaxed somewhat and begins to open up. Then, about halfway through the interview, I’ll ask, “What has been a moment of significant professional disappointment or failure, and what caused it?”

Straightforward enough, right? Yes, but I’m listening for a few key things. First, it asks an interviewee to come up with a specific moment. Rather than the standard “What are your weaknesses?” question, which more often provokes groans from jobseekers, it asks for a concrete professional incident. But this gives a candidate plenty of options: Do they focus on a lost promotion, or a failed project? Do they make it about themselves, or about their company? You can see a lot of their personality by how they interpret the question.

What’s more, by asking what caused the failure, the question doesn’t require an applicant to take responsibility for it, though they might choose to. In my experience, these are three types of answers I typically hear—with some responses earning better marks than others.

Click here to read the rest on Fast Company >>

7 Body Language Mistakes to Avoid in a Job Interview

Filed under: Good Habits, Hiring, Interviews, Job Search

You’ve perfected your elevator pitch, can explain your greatest weakness, and know exactly where you want to be in five years. But have you studied your body language? If not, you could end up costing yourself a job offer.

Even talented candidates can torpedo their chances if they make certain body language mistakes during an interview, according to a recent survey of more than 2,500 hiring managers by job search website CareerBuilder. Fidgeting, a weak handshake, or a constant grimace can leave a bad impression and may even take you out of the running for the position. Combine those errors with other mistakes, like dressing inappropriately, swearing, or displaying an arrogant attitude, and you have a recipe for an interview disaster.

“Preparing for an interview takes a lot more than Googling answers to common interview questions,” Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer for CareerBuilder, said in a statement. “Candidates have to make a great first impression appearance-wise, have a solid understanding of the target company, know exactly how to convey that they’re the perfect fit for the job and control their body language.”

Click here to read the rest on CheatSheet >>>

Interviewing 101: Attire & Hygiene Checklist

Filed under: Best Advice, Good Habits, Interviews, Job Search

When interviewing, it’s important to present yourself in the best light possible. Appearing disheveled, unorganized, or unprofessional may hinder you in your job search. The following list highlights some general good practices for interview attire and hygiene. Every situation is unique; so use your best judgement to decide what makes sense for your situation.

Clothing + Accessories

  • Wear a clean, pressed, properly fitted (not too tight, short, or loose), neutral-colored suit. (TIP: Carry a stain removing stick if you plan on eating or drinking prior to your interview).
  • Check that your shirt is tucked in, buttoned, and clean. Ensure your tie is properly tied and your shirt is fully buttoned.
  • Avoid wearing anything overly revealing.
  • Wear clean, polished, and comfortable shoes. You may be invited on a tour of the office, be sure to choose shoes you can walk in with confidence.
  • Refrain from carrying too many bags with you; a purse or messenger bag is acceptable.
  • Avoid costume jewelry or anything overly flashy, as this could be distracting to an interviewer.
  • Consider covering tattoos and removing facial piercings, if possible. While tattoos are generally accepted, there is no way of telling how a hiring manager may feel about them. Avoid the risk of offending anyone by covering them for the interview.
  • Refrain from bringing coffee cups or any other beverage with you. Keep your hands free to shake hands with your interviewer.
  • Leave personal items, such as laptops, tablets, and smartphones in your bag. Do not take them out at any point, even if you are waiting in a room for the interviewer to arrive.

Personal Hygiene

  • Brush, floss, and use mouthwash prior to your interview. (TIP: If you are concerned about bad breath, carry a small bottle of mouthwash and use it in a coffee shop bathroom immediately before your interview).
  • Comb or style your hair in a professional manner; avoid dying your hair bright colors (blue, purple, pink, etc.) prior to starting a job search.
  • Clean and manicure your nails. If you choose to wear to nail polish, choose a neutral or clear color.
  • Keep your makeup natural.
  • Avoid wearing perfume or cologne. Your hiring manager may not like the scent you have chosen, have a previous association with that scent, or be allergic to it.
  • Wear deodorant. If you sweat when nervous, you may want to choose a clinical strength brand.
  • If traveling on a hot day, give yourself enough time to freshen up in a restroom prior to your interview.
  • Do your best not smoke prior to an interview. If you do, give yourself a few minutes after your cigarette before entering the building, then wash your hands and use mouthwash.
  • If you are chewing gum, dispose of it prior to your interview.

Ready to start your job search and gain more insight into acing your next interview? Join Solomon Page’s Talent Network and let us find you the BEST opportunities!