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Category: Hiring

New York City Applicants Have One Less Thing to Worry About

Filed under: Hiring, Job Search, News

Today, New York City becomes the first city in the United States to prohibit employers from inquiring about job seekers’ and job applicants’ salary histories. Signed into law earlier this year, New York joins a handful of other cities and states (among them California, Massachusetts, Oregon, Delaware, Philadelphia, and San Francisco) across the country that voted to ban employer questions about salary history. New York will be the first municipality to enforce the law.

The new law was introduced by Public Advocate Letitia James in August 2016, due in part to the findings of a gender pay gap analysis conducted earlier that year. As James put it, “We want to end…discrimination, and banning questions about salary history is a critical first step.” The New York City law is intended to help reduce the differences that women and minorities earn relative to their male and Caucasian counterparts. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, women earn 80 cents for every dollar that men earn, and in New York, women earn $5.8 billion less than men in wages each year, according to a report by New York City’s Public Advocate’s office, a disparity that’s even greater for people of color (with black women making just 55 cents and Hispanic women earning just 45 cents of every dollar earned by a white man).

While there are multiple explanations for the gender pay gap, laws prohibiting employers from taking pay history into account may help reduce the impact of historical salary discrimination. Effective today, employers will no longer be able to:

  • Ask job applicants questions about or solicit information in any way about applicants’ current or prior earnings or benefits, including on job application forms
  • Ask applicants’ current or former employers or their employees about applicants’ current or prior earnings or benefits
  • Search public records to learn about applicants’ current or prior earnings or benefits
  • Rely on information about applicants’ current or prior earnings or benefits to set their compensation

The law will be enforced by the NYC Commission on Human Rights and apply to both private and public sector employers and covers internships, contractor roles, part-time and full-time positions.

Continue reading on Forbes

You’re Invited: Legal Services Candidate Open House

Filed under: Goals, Hiring, Interviews, Job Search, Legal, Networking, Recruiting & Hiring, Temp Work, Your Career

YOU’RE INVITED

Solomon Page Legal Services Candidate Open House
Wednesday, May 17th
1:00pm – 4:00pm

Join the Solomon Page team to enjoy light refreshments while registering for exciting upcoming legal opportunities. We have new projects every week, and are eager to meet document review attorneys of all levels. Registering with Solomon Page is an important first step for consideration. Informative group sessions will be held to discuss the benefits and the resources provided to our exclusive community.

Added bonus! Brush up your resume with Legal Services East Coast Managing Director Julie Favetta, who will be hosting Resume Workshops throughout the day. These workshops give you exclusive access to over 20 years of experience working with clients and placing candidates at Top 50 Law Firms and Fortune 500 Companies.

To confirm your attendance, please RSVP before May 14th by emailing RSVP@solomonpage.com with your resume attached and preferred time slot: 

1:00PM – 1:30PM
1:45PM – 2:15PM
2:30PM – 3:00PM
3:15PM – 3:45PM
Space is limited and we will only be able to meet with individuals that RSVP with their resume to the email address noted above. We look forward to seeing you soon!

Why Freelancing Will Be Part of Nearly Everyone’s Future

Filed under: Hiring, Societal Shifts

Whether you’re hiring or getting hired, plenty of evidence points to a future workforce which looks much different than it does today.

Much has been written about the gig economy–a future in which traditional full-time jobs are displaced by mostly short-term contracts or freelance work. But whether or not the rise of freelancing will be a bad or good thing is certainly debatable. The New York Times recently published an op-ed piece titled “The Gig Economy’s False Promise,” while a Wired headline reads “The Gig Economy: The Force That Could Save the American Worker?” Regardless of your feelings on the subject, plenty of evidence points to a future workforce which looks much different than it does today. That’s according to Stephen DeWitt, CEO of Work Market, an enterprise-class platform for the management of contract and freelance talent. Here are his thoughts about why freelancing will touch nearly everyone in the years to come, whether you’re looking for help, or getting hired yourself.

1. Many crystal balls are showing the gig economy to be a real thing.
More than 55 million people–about 35 percent of the U.S. workforce–did some kind of freelance work last year. Experts agree this number will only continue to climb. According to the Intuit 2020 Report (PDF) in just a few years traditional employment will no longer be the status quo. More than 80 percent of large companies say they will be significantly increasing their use of flexible workers. And, the number of contingent workers–freelancers, temps, part-time workers and contractors–will exceed 40 percent of the U.S. workforce by 2020.

Continue reading the original article on Inc…

Business Insider Interviews Alexis DuFresne about Wall Street Hiring Trends

Filed under: Hiring, Job Search

Business Insider spoke with six Wall Street recruiters to uncover today’s hottest trends in hiring. Among those interviewed was Alexis DuFresne, a Managing Director of the Financial Services division at Solomon Page. Below, you’ll find an excerpt from the article.

It’s moving season on Wall Street.

Bonuses have landed in bank accounts, freeing up bankers and traders to move to new employers. Big people moves on Wall Street often occur around this time of year.

With that in mind, we asked six Wall Street recruiters about the big trends in hiring.

Here’s what the recruiters had to say.

“I tell candidates to give themselves six months to a year to find the right role.” – Alexis DuFresne, Solomon Page

Systematic funds are doing the most hiring in volume on the analyst and portfolio manager side, while systematic and private capital strategies are driving marketing hires. Facing redemptions last year, we saw that our clients had a surprising increase in compensation for marketing and investor relations roles, as the asset retention and business development functions were recognized as highly influential on the health and stability of the funds for which they represent.

While search is highly cyclical, the value add to asset managers is how to help them innovate. So even while assets may decrease or performance may slow, wise managers are constantly looking to identify and attract talent in any market condition and sub-strategy to give them a competitive edge, and maybe even at a discount if they recruit at the bottom of the market. As an example, long-short equity may be at an all-time slowdown in performance, with some funds coasting on management fees. However, if a manager sees an excellent portfolio manager candidate, they may make room for the candidate.

Read the complete article on Business Insider…

Wagner College Q&A with Gregg Gavioli

Filed under: Career Advice, Hiring, Job Search, Professional Development

Wagner College invited Gregg Gavioli, Managing Director of the Accounting & Finance division at Solomon Page, to speak to their top 5% of business students, known as “Selects,” at a round table event. The discussion covered the job market, networking, and the finance industry and provided upcoming graduates with an intimate opportunity to ask questions and learn about working as a professional in the accounting and financial industries.

Below is a Q&A excerpt from this meeting.

1. What types of jobs within the industry are threatened the most by the rise of financial technology?

Operations roles. Clearing, customer service, trade execution. Anything that can be automated, off shored, or moved to a lower cost center. If you are open to relocation, many major banks have large service centers in places like Salt Lake, Baltimore, Tampa, Jacksonville, Dallas, and Tennessee. If you are flexible, there can be opportunity there for you.

 

2. Is our generation really worse off than our parents in terms of earning potential?

I don’t think so. Wages are rising. The main point of difference may be if you are carrying student debt. My advice is live frugally for your first 5 years. Don’t eat out often. Make coffee at home. Live with many roommates or parents where possible. Start a 401k as soon as you can.

 

3. The finance industry is overwhelming. I have 2 months until graduation and still have no idea what I want to do. What is my best strategy from this point forward?

You may not know what you want to do any time soon. That’s OK. Field as many interviews and get as many job offers as you can. Take the one that has the most opportunity to learn many things closely aligned with your interest. Learn what you like and what you don’t like in that first job and use it to find your next. You will likely need to do this a few times before you know what “your field” is.  Find something your passionate about, and it will not feel like a job. You don’t want to be watching the clock waiting for the end of the day to run out the door. If it feels that way all the time, change fields.

 

4. What is the single most important quality that you are looking for in an applicant? Particularly a Wagner student going up against the Ivy League?

Ability to communicate effectively. Make eye contact. Is there a fire in your belly? Do I want you on my team? Do you know excel at a high level?

 

5. What do you believe is the best way to write a cover letter to get yourself noticed and receive a response? What should be included? Length?

One page, always customize it, mention why you are the perfect candidate for the role.

 

6. What entry level positions should we be looking for to put ourselves in the best position for a greater opportunity down the road?

Any one that puts you in a positon to learn. Be open to figuring things out on your own. Ask for more work when you need it. Compliance and analytics roles offer long term opportunity as well as anything that can make you a subject matter expert where you can transition to a Project manager or a Business Analyst at some point.

 

7. What areas of the finance industry are up and coming and what areas of the industry do you see dying out within the next 10 years?

Compliance. Big Data, Projects Management, Business Analytics, Analytics, Ad-tech. Analytics related to Advertising, Social Media, and Search engines is an exciting field to explore for finance majors.

 

8. What career paths would you recommend for a finance major, aside from the traditional banking route?

Compliance, analytics, quant, advertising data analysis, FPA, Budget.

 

9. How did you go about expanding your network

Use LinkedIn. Did you create a profile? Have you joined the Wagner Alumni group I created on LinkedIn?  Send a customized email to any Wagner Alumni who may be working at your target company who may be open to meeting you for coffee for advice or helping you with applications. Professional and social groups. HS Groups. Skills Group like compliance, advertising, accounting clubs (IMA, AICPA) etc.

 

10. Did you get a master’s Degree and if so when did you get it.

No. If you are not getting it right away, see if you can get tuition reimbursement from a big employer. It’s most important when advancing up the ladder into management roles and has the biggest payoff there.

 

11. What are your recommendations on preparing for a meeting with a mentor?

Research the mentor. Come prepared with questions based on their background. Use their time wisely.

 

12. What is the most effective way of preparing for an interview?

Research the Company, research interviewer’s profiles, have multiple different questions prepared for different people. Up to 10 questions is not too many. Never say I have no questions at all.

 

13. How can I ensure follow up after an application?

You can’t really but send a customized thank you note, if no response one more check in email is OK and that is the max. Have a thank you note ready to go after the interview in a stamped envelope and drop in the post office box near the company.

For upcoming graduates, our expert recruiters are equipped with the advice and contacts to help jumpstart your professional career. Get in touch today and learn more about our service offerings.

Thought Leadership: Q1 2017 Marketing & Investor Relations Search Update

Filed under: Hiring, Insights, Thought Leadership

In the link below, please find our 2017 Q1 Thought Leadership piece, a reflection on the 2016 marketing landscape.

The intention of this paper is to summarize patterns witnessed throughout 2016 and forecast marketing and hiring trends for 2017.

Briefly, here is an excerpt…

  • Asset management experienced a rocky 2016, particularly for marketing hires. Due to record outflows of capital, uncertain markets over Brexit and the presidential election, and a lack of performance, it’s not unexpected that sales hires slowed dramatically.
  • As we see performance picking up again, and clarity around the political landscape, the firms who have strong marketers and well-packaged messaging will surely gain traction and exceed their peers, just as we’ve seen in prior cycles.
  • Private equity marketers are increasingly more expensive and they move a lot less, making the hiring market extremely competitive.
  • Hedge funds are constantly innovating and will always be hiring, whether it’s product growth or replacement. These firms tend to evolve quickly, as opposed to year over year.

Whether you or your company are seeking a recruitment partner to address your hiring needs, or you are looking for information on potential opportunities, we look forward to answering your questions.

Written by Alexis DuFresne

Click here to read the complete article >>

How to Know You’re the Right Person for the Job – and Convince Others

Filed under: ambition, Hiring, Job Search, Professional Development

Being certain that you’re the right person for the job is as important for you as it is for the person potentially hiring or promoting you. It may be you’re going for a senior position or you may be just starting out in your career. You might be seeking an internal promotion, a transfer across the business or a new external role. In all circumstances, we need to be able to decipher if we’re the right person for the job. And then if we believe the answer is yes, to be able to convince the decision makers to come to the same conclusion.

Here are five ways we can know and convince others we’re the right person.

1. The job seems too hard. Whenever you have a choice, don’t go for a role that you can already do. Go for one that will be a stretch and force you to develop.

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >>