Blog

Category: Decision Making

Success with a Moral Compass

Filed under: Career Advice, Decision Making, Good Habits, Success

Nothing worthwhile in life comes easy. You will never see success without hard work, determination and the ability to make tough decisions. Sometimes you have to be ruthless for the sake of the company, your employees and, of course, yourself.

But it’s equally as important to have a strong moral code and to conduct yourself in an honorable, honest and forthright manner. A reputation for fair play and integrity is priceless. Here are some principles that I have embraced while building three successful companies—with the third, RadiumOne, hopefully on its path to billion-dollar status.

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When To Go With Your Gut

Filed under: Best Advice, Decision Making, Productivity, Quick Tips

As a general rule, gut instinct is nothing to be ashamed of. Quite the opposite. It’s really just pattern recognition, isn’t it? You’ve seen something so many times over your life or career that you just get what’s going on without a lot of deep thinking. Gut instinct is a deep, even subconscious, familiarity — the voice inside you that tells you “Go for it now” or “No way — not ever.” We would wager, however, that the most common gut call falls in between the two. We’re talking about the “uh-oh” response in which your stomach informs you that something is not right.

The trick, of course, is to know when to go with your gut. That’s easy when you discover, over time, that your gut is usually right. But such confidence can take years.

Until that point, we suggest a rule of thumb: Gut calls are usually pretty helpful when it comes to looking at deals and less so when it comes to picking people.

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The Secret to Making Good Decisions

Filed under: Decision Making, Your Career

On the way to a successful career, decisions have to be made, some of which will prove critical. One good decision can have positive repercussions for years, but so can one bad decision. Where decision-making is studied – mostly at business schools and departments of government – there’s a kind of pseudo-science that has developed, in which the human element (subjectivity) is reduced as much as possible so that the rational element (objectivity) can dominate.

This tactic ignores the fact that all decisions are human – there’s no machine to make them for us – and history tells us that the greatest decision always involved a combination of human genius, passion, determination, and foibles. Emotions flared, for good and ill. In fact, when you read history, you become more and more fascinated by the human drama that unfolds – you might even say that history is nothing but drama.

But what does this mean for you and the decisions you must make? It means that if you want to make good decisions, you must plunge in and make them with full awareness of the human situation. If instead you try to reduce every big decision to a dry, rational computation, you will shut out the very things that go into a good decision.

So, what makes a good decision good? There are four human elements.

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