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Category: company culture

Want Your Best Employees to Never Leave You? Give Them the 7 Things They Need the Most

Filed under: company culture, Leadership, teams

In the quest to crack the code on employee engagement, companies spend hundreds of thousands of dollars each year on wasted efforts to “develop their leaders.”

Since leadership development is broad, it needs to be clearly defined for business outcomes. The common denominator is teaching managers the fine art of people skills. After all, leading an organization is still mostly about people — its most important asset. Without mastering people skills, you simply cannot be a good leader.

But to do that, managers must have a basic understanding of human behavior. What science has already found is that positive emotions are at the root of human motivation. We are wired for it in our creation design.

Therefore, managers must acquire the knowledge of what makes people tick and what inspires human beings to perform at a high level.

1. People at work need to feel safe.
This is true especially as they start a new role or job. They need confidence boosters from their leaders. Emotionally intelligent leaders will build them up through encouragement, praise, and positive affirmation. They will show them hope for the future, ask them about their goals and interests, and give them assurance of a career path. Safety is a basic human need and the best employees want to know where they stand — now and in the future. The best leaders give them that hope by speaking to their needs.

2. People at work need compliments.
“I don’t like to be recognized,” said no human being, ever. Managers have to get into the habit of praising and complimenting their people for their good qualities and work. The companies in Gallup’s study with the highest engagement levels use recognition and praise as a powerful motivator to get their commitment. They found that employees who receive it on a regular basis increase their individual productivity, receive higher loyalty and satisfaction scores from customers, and are more likely to stay with their organization. How regular are we talking? Praise should be given once per week, according to Gallup.

Continue reading on Inc. >>

How to Understand a Company’s Culture from the Outside

Filed under: company culture

Imagine you’ve just received a job offer. Congratulations! If you’re like most people, the first question on your mind is, “Wait? How do I know if I’ll like this job?” All you have is an offer letter and a job description with policies and procedures. How can you understand an organization’s culture from the outside? My favorite definition of culture comes from Airbnb’s Brian Chesky: “Culture is simply a shared way of doing something with passion.”

According to MIT culture scholar Edgar Schein, there are three ways to understand culture: 1) Artifacts—which are visible things like what people wear to work; 2) Beliefs and values—which are more invisible, like valuing consensus when making decisions; and 3) Basic underlying assumptions, which are usually unconscious, like a belief that you should hire people like yourself. So how can you find these out?

Click here to read the rest on The Huffington Post >>

Why Culture Matters More Than Goals

Filed under: Career Advice, company culture, Goals, Insights

What’s the culture of your organization? Is it an environment where things get done on time, every time? Or are deadlines more flexible? Do you believe in having fun, or is it more serious?

Every organization has a culture, so does every family. Culture is the, usually, unspoken beliefs about how things work around here.

Peter Drucker famously said, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”

Culture is often what enables or prevents an organization from achieving goals.

For example, if an organization sets a goal to increase on time deliveries, but the culture tolerates excuses, it’s unlikely that the team will achieve the goal. The company can provide incentives, and it may drive a short-term spike, but in the end, the culture will ultimately prevail.

Why does this happen?

It’s a case of implicit versus explicit. Most leaders are explicit about goals, they write them down, share them, and measure against them. But when it comes to culture, it’s more implicit. We assume people should just “know” how to behave.

Click here to read the rest on Huffington Post >>