Blog

Category: Cognitive Ability

Here’s How to Spend the First Hour of the Workday for Maximum Productivity

Filed under: Cognitive Ability, Focus, Good Habits, Productivity

Let’s divide work into two categories.

There’s “work,” and then there’s real work. “Work” is email correspondence, and group meetings, and other administrative tasks that are technically necessary, but don’t meaningfully contribute to your professional success.

Real work, on the other hand, encompasses those bigger projects and tasks that help you achieve your goals and your organization’s. It’s the kind of work that drew you to your job and your line of work in the first place.

Click here to read the rest on Business Insider >>

7 Tips to Improve Your Memory

Filed under: Cognitive Ability, Communication, Focus, Psychology, Strategy

Answer before you have an answer

Learning ability is probably the most important skill you can have.

Take it from Peter Brown, Henry Roediger, and Mark McDaniel, authors of Make It Stick: The Science Of Successful Learning.

“We need to keep learning and remembering all our lives,” they write. “Getting ahead at work takes mastery of job skills and difficult colleagues … If you’re good at learning, you have an advantage in life.”

And to learn something is to be able to remember it, say the authors, two of whom are psychology professors at Washington University in St. Louis.

Unfortunately, lots of the techniques for learning that we pick up in school don’t help with long-term recall — like cramming or highlighting.

To get over these bad habits, we scoured “Make It Stick” for learning tips.

Click here to read the rest on TIME >>

18 Signs of High Emotional Intelligence

Filed under: Cognitive Ability, Insights, Psychology, Relationships, Self Reflection

When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70 per cent of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held assumption that IQ was the sole source of success.

Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. The connection is so strong that 90 per cent of top performers have high emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is the “something” in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions to achieve positive results.

Despite the significance of EQ, its intangible nature makes it very difficult to know how much you have and what you can do to improve if you’re lacking. You can always take a scientifically validated test, such as the one that comes with the Emotional Intelligence 2.0 book.

Click here to read the rest on Core Spirit >>

4 Really Dumb Ways to Make Decisions That Derail Your Success

Filed under: Career Advice, Cognitive Ability, Decision Making, Good Habits, Professional Development, Psychology

Whether in business or in life, we all tend to have different perceptions of, or biases about, the people and circumstances around us.

There’s a degree of truth in the saying “perception is reality” but there are at least four false perceptions or biases that hinder our relationships, growth and success.

1. Associative bias.
This is a fancy term for linking unrelated events, patterns or outcomes together. While many innovators and entrepreneurs thrive and build successful enterprises making connections that other people don’t see, that’s a different type of mental leap than an associative bias.

An example of associative bias is throwing out the garbage, then realizing you can’t find your keys. The obvious reaction of many people in that situation is, “Oh my God, I threw my keys away!” They start pawing through the trash, when in fact they actually left their keys on the counter.

This is a time-wasting bias that causes unnecessary delays and rework.

Click here to read the rest on Entrepreneur >>

Think Grammar Doesn’t Matter? It Could Be Holding You Back From a Promotion

Filed under: Career Advice, Cognitive Ability, Feedback, Insights, Uncategorized

Many people think that once they leave school, they don’t need to worry about grammar. In the real world, most people will just figure out what you mean … right?

Not quite. Turns out, quality writing can help you get ahead in your career — and poor writing can hold you back. So if you want to get ahead in the workplace, change careers, or find a job, then it’s time to dust off that dictionary, thumb through your thesaurus, and get a grip on grammar.

At Grammarly, we found some data to back this up. We studied 100 LinkedIn profiles of native English-speakers in the consumer packaged goods industry, and each of the professionals we looked at worked for no more than three employers over the first 10 years of their career. Half were promoted to director-level or above within those 10 years, and the other half were not.

We discovered a correlation between the number of grammar and spelling errors in a profile and the trajectory of that person’s career. Here are some of our study’s main takeaways:

Click here to read the rest on HubSpot Blogs >>

The Surprising Truth About the Perfect Brainstorm

Filed under: Cognitive Ability, ideas, Insights, Quick Tips

My article on brainstorming sessions that make people crazy generated a lot of requests for tips to make brainstorming effective. If you follow this guide, not only will you save the sanity of your team, you may also produce some innovative new ideas that could catapult your company. Here are seven tips for brainstorming that works and won’t drive your team crazy:

1. Include No More Than 10 People

The bigger the group, the less likely you will have a productive discussion. Yes, really, no more than 10 people.

2. Don’t Include the Ego Invite

Brainstorming is not a popularity contest. As much as everyone may want to participate, or you feel like you have to invite a certain member of your board or leadership team to join you, resist the urge. That is exactly the reason why brainstorming sessions fail. Bring the people together who have the most to contribute to your topic, and stop worrying about whose ego you will dent.

Click here to read the rest on INC >>

Seven Ways To Sharpen Your Memory

Filed under: Cognitive Ability, Focus, Good Habits, Skills

We often talk about our ability to remember in terms of its being good or bad: “I have a mind like a sieve,” “He has a photographic memory,” “She works hard, but she just can’t retain what she’s learned.”

What we fail to recognize is that the way we use our memory has a lot to do with how effectively it operates. Here, seven strategies from cognitive science and psychology that will allow us to remember better.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>