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Category: Career Advice

Market Insights Report: 2018 Job Satisfaction Survey and Salary Analysis

Filed under: Career Advice, Job Market, Research, Strategy, Thought Leadership

The Solomon Page Market Insights Report: 2018 Job Satisfaction Survey and Salary Analysis is now available for download. Get your copy here.

This is the inaugural study of this scope for Solomon Page—and we are very proud to be sharing it with you. Solomon Page has been a leader in staffing and executive search since our inception in 1990, and we continually strive to raise the bar and add value for both our candidates and clients. For job seekers, this study will provide insight into how you rank versus your peers in both job satisfaction and compensation. For companies, you will learn what makes a job offer attractive, and key factors in the retention, growth, and satisfaction of your workforce.

As we set out on our mission to produce this study, we partnered with Inavero, a market research firm specializing in the staffing industry, to conduct research and analysis on relevant trends for both candidates and clients in today’s employment market. We gathered close to 1000 responses from a cross-section of junior-, mid-, and senior-level employees.

The methodology of the study was to evaluate the lifecycle of a job search and analyze findings throughout each stage of the process: search drivers, the offer, retention, and contemplating a change. We have coupled this with market sentiment and perceptions of temporary vs. full-time work to create the Market Insights Report Part One: Job Satisfaction Survey. We then gathered and analyzed current information from the Solomon Page database to compile Part Two: Salary Analysis.

Our findings suggest a positive perception of the current job market, and that this optimism will most likely increase in the three years to come. Considering that the unemployment rate is the lowest it has been in 18 years, we are not surprised. More intriguing findings include the fact that training / continuing education ranks as the most impactful engagement factor, and that company culture and work / life balance have the largest impact on retention and satisfaction.

We hope this report helps you gain insight and perspective while you strive to achieve your job search or hiring goals.

15 Habits of Self-Made Millionaires

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Goals, inspiration, Professional Development, Strategy, Success

Success doesn’t crop up overnight. All self-made millionaires had to start somewhere.

Much of their transformation from ordinary to seven-figure status can be attributed to “rich habits,” a term coined by Thomas C. Corley, who spent five years researching the daily habits of 177 self-made millionaires.

“From my research, I discovered that daily habits dictate how successful or unsuccessful you will be in life,” he writes in his 2016 book “Change Your Habits, Change Your Life.”

“There is a cause and effect associated with habits. Habits are the cause of wealth, poverty, happiness, sadness, stress, good relationships, bad relationships, good health, or bad health.”

The good news is all habits can be changed, Corley notes. Here are some “rich habits” of self-made millionaires that you can start developing today:

They read consistently.
The rich would rather be educated than entertained. As Corley writes, “Eighty-eight percent of the rich devote thirty minutes or more each day to self-education or self-improvement reading … Most did not read for entertainment … The rich read to acquire or maintain knowledge.”

Corley found that they tend to read three types of books: biographies of successful people, self-help or personal development, and history.

Continue reading the original article on Business Insider…

Wagner College Q&A with Gregg Gavioli

Filed under: Career Advice, Hiring, Job Search, Professional Development

Wagner College invited Gregg Gavioli, Managing Director of the Accounting & Finance division at Solomon Page, to speak to their top 5% of business students, known as “Selects,” at a round table event. The discussion covered the job market, networking, and the finance industry and provided upcoming graduates with an intimate opportunity to ask questions and learn about working as a professional in the accounting and financial industries.

Below is a Q&A excerpt from this meeting.

1. What types of jobs within the industry are threatened the most by the rise of financial technology?

Operations roles. Clearing, customer service, trade execution. Anything that can be automated, off shored, or moved to a lower cost center. If you are open to relocation, many major banks have large service centers in places like Salt Lake, Baltimore, Tampa, Jacksonville, Dallas, and Tennessee. If you are flexible, there can be opportunity there for you.

 

2. Is our generation really worse off than our parents in terms of earning potential?

I don’t think so. Wages are rising. The main point of difference may be if you are carrying student debt. My advice is live frugally for your first 5 years. Don’t eat out often. Make coffee at home. Live with many roommates or parents where possible. Start a 401k as soon as you can.

 

3. The finance industry is overwhelming. I have 2 months until graduation and still have no idea what I want to do. What is my best strategy from this point forward?

You may not know what you want to do any time soon. That’s OK. Field as many interviews and get as many job offers as you can. Take the one that has the most opportunity to learn many things closely aligned with your interest. Learn what you like and what you don’t like in that first job and use it to find your next. You will likely need to do this a few times before you know what “your field” is.  Find something your passionate about, and it will not feel like a job. You don’t want to be watching the clock waiting for the end of the day to run out the door. If it feels that way all the time, change fields.

 

4. What is the single most important quality that you are looking for in an applicant? Particularly a Wagner student going up against the Ivy League?

Ability to communicate effectively. Make eye contact. Is there a fire in your belly? Do I want you on my team? Do you know excel at a high level?

 

5. What do you believe is the best way to write a cover letter to get yourself noticed and receive a response? What should be included? Length?

One page, always customize it, mention why you are the perfect candidate for the role.

 

6. What entry level positions should we be looking for to put ourselves in the best position for a greater opportunity down the road?

Any one that puts you in a positon to learn. Be open to figuring things out on your own. Ask for more work when you need it. Compliance and analytics roles offer long term opportunity as well as anything that can make you a subject matter expert where you can transition to a Project manager or a Business Analyst at some point.

 

7. What areas of the finance industry are up and coming and what areas of the industry do you see dying out within the next 10 years?

Compliance. Big Data, Projects Management, Business Analytics, Analytics, Ad-tech. Analytics related to Advertising, Social Media, and Search engines is an exciting field to explore for finance majors.

 

8. What career paths would you recommend for a finance major, aside from the traditional banking route?

Compliance, analytics, quant, advertising data analysis, FPA, Budget.

 

9. How did you go about expanding your network

Use LinkedIn. Did you create a profile? Have you joined the Wagner Alumni group I created on LinkedIn?  Send a customized email to any Wagner Alumni who may be working at your target company who may be open to meeting you for coffee for advice or helping you with applications. Professional and social groups. HS Groups. Skills Group like compliance, advertising, accounting clubs (IMA, AICPA) etc.

 

10. Did you get a master’s Degree and if so when did you get it.

No. If you are not getting it right away, see if you can get tuition reimbursement from a big employer. It’s most important when advancing up the ladder into management roles and has the biggest payoff there.

 

11. What are your recommendations on preparing for a meeting with a mentor?

Research the mentor. Come prepared with questions based on their background. Use their time wisely.

 

12. What is the most effective way of preparing for an interview?

Research the Company, research interviewer’s profiles, have multiple different questions prepared for different people. Up to 10 questions is not too many. Never say I have no questions at all.

 

13. How can I ensure follow up after an application?

You can’t really but send a customized thank you note, if no response one more check in email is OK and that is the max. Have a thank you note ready to go after the interview in a stamped envelope and drop in the post office box near the company.

For upcoming graduates, our expert recruiters are equipped with the advice and contacts to help jumpstart your professional career. Get in touch today and learn more about our service offerings.

The Positive Trait That Holds Talented People Back at Work

Filed under: Behavior in the Workplace, Career Advice, Communication, Confidence

In a perfect world, your completed assignments would speak for themselves. You’d work on friendly, collaborative teams with fair-minded co-workers, and each person would be free with praise and full of self-effacing humility. You’d never have to worry about self-promotion or navigating office politics to get your due.

But the reality is that you need to speak up. Generosity and a humble nature are great attributes to have, of course. They help you keep a team-first attitude, improve your leadership abilities, and generally endear people to you as a professional.

However, if you think you can just let your work speak for itself and never stake out that territory yourself, then being “the humble one” is hurting your career.

Here’s how:

1. It Makes You Invisible

Imagine this: Your team just completed a complex, innovative project, and you feel proud of your contributions to the group effort. But when the boss stands up at the company meeting to praise your team’s work, others are singled out for individual contributions while you seem invisible.

Click here to read the rest on The Muse >>

4 Signs It’s Time To Change Your Job (And 2 Signs It’s Not)

Filed under: Career Advice, Decision Making

The working world isn’t the same as it used to be. With millennials changing jobs four times in their first decade out of college, according to a recent study by LinkedIn, we’re a long way away from the time where people stayed at the same company from first day to last.

While many bemoan the frivolous nature of the millennial generation for this constant chopping and changing, it’s not the CV faux pas that it once was. The availability of information and constantly changing job market have both contributed to increased acceptability. But how do you know when it’s time to make a move?

We all know an ideal job needs to be exciting and engaging, with the right culture to make you jump out of bed in the morning bright eyed and ready to start your day. But if you’re less sure about the pros and cons of your current job, how do you know if it’s time to see if the grass really is greener?

Click here to read the rest on Come Recommended >> 

 

WHY ARE WE ALL SO AFRAID TO TALK ABOUT OUR MISTAKES?

Filed under: Career Advice, Insights, Women Leaders

WHEN I WAS 14, I MARCHED INTO THE HOUSE WITH MY REPORT CARD, TOSSED IT IN FRONT OF MY DAD, AND WAITED FOR HIM TO GASP AT THE PERFECT GRADE COLUMN: A, A, A, A, A, A, A.
But after a silent speed read, my dad glanced up and said:
“Hey! Kit, this is great! But maybe next semester, let yourself get a C in something.”
I’ve always been a perfectionist. Like a Type A, anxiety-prone, neurotic mess when things don’t go my way, nut job perfectionist. If you’re reading this site, chances are you’re something of one, too. Maybe the thought of screwing up at work can keep you from sleeping at night or a performance review with any semblance of constructive criticism makes your stomach churn. Or maybe the idea of an off-center Instagram post can ruin your week.
Mistakes, right? Nothing like making one to ruin a perfectly good day. So we do our best to never let them happen.

Click here to read the rest on Career Contessa >>

5 Things No One Will Tell You At Your First Job

Filed under: Career Advice, Your Career

It’s your first job. It’s hard not to be excited. There is so much to learn and a lot of it will be told to you directly but there will be so many important lessons you won’t even realize your absorbing until later. But here is a jumpstart on some of the things no one is telling you at your first job.
Your life’s greater purpose.
Sure, many of us are lucky to land a role that points us down the perfect path. But your greater life’s purpose probably isn’t directly tied to the workplace — it’s a lot more complex than that. It’ll take time for you to grow as an individual before you decide what you value most in the world, and this first role might not give that to you.
Anything you don’t ask about.
Remember, this job is your responsibility. If you don’t ask questions, you’re not going to get answers. Soak up everything you see around you, but don’t forget to put the queries out there. It’s time to take charge of your role, and asking the right questions is the best way to begin.

Click here to read the rest on LEVO >>