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Category: ambition

Lloyd Solomon Featured in Real Estate REality Check Podcast

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Company News, Insights, Interviews, Professional Development, Solomon Page, Success, Thought Leadership

Lloyd Solomon, Managing Director of Solomon Page, was recently interviewed by Larry Haber in his podcast Leasing REality: Real Estate REality Check.

Larry conducts an ongoing series of weekly conversations with business executives designed to empower emerging and seasoned professionals to reach their full business potential. Using rock ‘n roll, hip hop, and pop culture analogies as the basis for many of his questions, the overwhelming majority of responses from his guests are informative, entertaining, and most importantly, a conduit to help incentivize listeners to become masters of their career and/or business domains.

Lloyd speaks to his journey building his business over the past 28 years, including the highs and lows, and prevalent lessons learned. He gives advice to business owners on how to lead a successful company and satisfied staff, in addition to providing insight to candidates looking to excel in their career.

You can listen to the podcast here.

15 Habits of Self-Made Millionaires

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Goals, inspiration, Professional Development, Strategy, Success

Success doesn’t crop up overnight. All self-made millionaires had to start somewhere.

Much of their transformation from ordinary to seven-figure status can be attributed to “rich habits,” a term coined by Thomas C. Corley, who spent five years researching the daily habits of 177 self-made millionaires.

“From my research, I discovered that daily habits dictate how successful or unsuccessful you will be in life,” he writes in his 2016 book “Change Your Habits, Change Your Life.”

“There is a cause and effect associated with habits. Habits are the cause of wealth, poverty, happiness, sadness, stress, good relationships, bad relationships, good health, or bad health.”

The good news is all habits can be changed, Corley notes. Here are some “rich habits” of self-made millionaires that you can start developing today:

They read consistently.
The rich would rather be educated than entertained. As Corley writes, “Eighty-eight percent of the rich devote thirty minutes or more each day to self-education or self-improvement reading … Most did not read for entertainment … The rich read to acquire or maintain knowledge.”

Corley found that they tend to read three types of books: biographies of successful people, self-help or personal development, and history.

Continue reading the original article on Business Insider…

How to Know You’re the Right Person for the Job – and Convince Others

Filed under: ambition, Hiring, Job Search, Professional Development

Being certain that you’re the right person for the job is as important for you as it is for the person potentially hiring or promoting you. It may be you’re going for a senior position or you may be just starting out in your career. You might be seeking an internal promotion, a transfer across the business or a new external role. In all circumstances, we need to be able to decipher if we’re the right person for the job. And then if we believe the answer is yes, to be able to convince the decision makers to come to the same conclusion.

Here are five ways we can know and convince others we’re the right person.

1. The job seems too hard. Whenever you have a choice, don’t go for a role that you can already do. Go for one that will be a stretch and force you to develop.

Click here to read the rest on Forbes >>

3 Power Plays Millennials Can Use to Avoid an Epic Career Fail

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Goals, Millennials, Professional Development

This is an email I got from a Millennial client this week:

Dear J.T.,

I recently graduated from college. I did an internship my senior year tied to my major and realized I don’t want to be in the field. It’s been four months, and I’m still trying to find a new career path and first job. I’m having a lot of trouble and am stressed. My biggest fear is I’ll be overqualified for the work and be unhappy.

My response was:

The last thing you should worry about is being overqualified. In fact, your goal should be to find a job where you are ridiculously overqualified.

Qualifications Without Third-Party Validation Aren’t of Value

Millennials are the most educated generation to ever enter the work force. However, a college degree doesn’t provide proof of skill. Learning how to do something and doing it skillfully are two very different things. Employers know that. It’s why they put you in entry-level jobs where you feel overqualified. They want to see you exceed expectations so you can earn their trust and respect. This is how you fast-track your career and move on to work that leverages your strengths and lets you continue to grow.

Click here to read the rest on Inc. >> 

11 Ways to Get What You Want Out of Your Review

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Communication, Confidence, Professional Development

Second only to the interview that landed you the job, performance reviews with your boss can be rife with trepidation. You’re going to be evaluated, asked to give your own critique, and more than likely, this is your shot to discuss a raise and/or promotion. Yikes. But as daunting as these topics can be, once you get over the initial nerves and dread, you can see it for what it really is: an opportunity to distinguish yourself.

To help quell anxieties and learn tricks of the performance review trade, we looked to three of our go-to career experts to outline how to prepare and tap into our inner #GirlBoss. No sweaty palms, here…

1. Over-prepare. Too many people miss important opportunities by not putting their heart into preparing for a review. Spend some time being thoughtful about the last year—and the next one. Write out answers to the following questions in advance:

Click here to read the rest on Marie Claire >>

4 Ways to Figure Out What You’re Good At (Not Just What You’re Passionate About)

Filed under: ambition, Career Advice, Confidence, Professional Development, Psychology, Self Reflection

It’s a universal dream to do what we’re passionate about. The only problem with this aspiration is that sometimes the thing we most care about isn’t what we do best. As Gloria Steinem famously said, “We teach what we need to learn, and write what we need to know.”

Don’t worry! This doesn’t mean your dream is dead. It just means that you need to figure out how to bring that dream to fruition—using the skills you currently possess. Sure, your dream will be tweaked and altered. But, at the end of the day, you’ll still be able to do what you’re passionate about.

Here are four questions you should ask yourself to help make that happen:

1. What Skills Have Helped You Thrive?

During your childhood and college years, you’ve no doubt developed certain skills out of necessity.

Click here to read the rest on The Muse >>

Procrastinating? 3 Ways to Find Motivation for Your Work

Filed under: ambition, Best Advice, motivation, procrastination

Is the fire in the belly you once felt for your work a flickering flame? Are you avoiding the next task on your list? It can happen to all of us. It could be you need a change in career. More likely it could mean you’ve simply lost touch with what energizes you about your role now. I know the feeling. We all do on certain days. So what do you do?

Here are three ways I restore my passion for hard work. What are yours?

1. Think less about what you have to do and more about what you can make happen. On weekends, I take bizarre comfort in cleaning a room or sweeping the yard because I can tell my efforts yielded a clear and visible outcome. I stare for long minutes at the evidence I accomplished something visible. On the other hand, a day’s work at the office can sometimes have an excruciatingly incremental quality. Maybe you tried and tried and nothing seems better or different. The hard work of progress at many jobs is scarcely evident and can wear you down unless you remember why you are grinding away at it in the first place. Worry less about what’s in front of you and more about what the end result could be. Write down where you hope your efforts will lead you and post this thought in your field of vision. Sometimes, to get through the day, you need to take time to imagine where you you are headed. For me, possibility is a great motivator.

Click here to read the rest on LinkedIn >>